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Los Angeles Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw shut down over arm issue

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPhoto by Allen Kee / ESPN Images(GLENDALE, Ariz.) — The Los Angeles Dodgers have shut down ace Clayton Kershaw indefinitely after he reportedly didn’t feel right during an early throwing session.Kershaw didn’t elaborate on the issue following the team’s Friday workout. He did say that he expects to be kept off the mound for only a few days.Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said the issue wasn’t related to Kershaw’s back, which has sent him to the injured list each of the last three years. Roberts called it “just an arm kind of thing,” but said “no one is alarmed or worried” because it is still early in Spring Training. The 30-year-old lefty has won the National League Cy Young Award three times, and signed a three-year contract extension with the Dodgers in November. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by February 22, 2019 /Sports News – National Los Angeles Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw shut down over arm issuecenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

BREAKING: Zoopla acquires sales progression platform YourKeys

first_imgHome » News » BREAKING: Zoopla acquires sales progression platform YourKeys previous nextProptechBREAKING: Zoopla acquires sales progression platform YourKeysThree-year old proptech ‘star’ has been snapped up by portal, which says it is seeking to bolster its agent and development tech offers.Nigel Lewis26th April 20211 Comment3,059 Views Zoopla has bought leading property sales progression platform YourKeys for an undisclosed sum.The portal has acquired the company, its tech and 25 staff including co-founder and CEO Riccardo Iannucci-Dawson, who incorporated the business in 2017 and launched it a year later to developers and in January last year to agents.YourKeys streamlines the new homes sales process for developers and agents by knitting them together buyers, conveyancers and lenders and helping simplify the new homes selling process, who buyers are often chain-free investors or first time purchasers.The sales progression platform offers visibility to both agents and developers about where leads come from and greater process transparency for all involved.YourKeys also says it significantly reduces fall-through rates for house builders and is described by Zoopla as a ‘star proptech’ because it’s one of the first to “take the entire ‘reservation to completion’ property sales process online”, the portal says.SalvoIts acquisition is the latest salvo in the battle between the three main portals to be leaders in tech to offer agents and developers much more than just a listings service.Zoopla is arguably the furthest ahead in this game, although both Rightmove and OnTheMarket have been trying to catch up.“This is an incredibly exciting next step for the entire Yourkeys team who are as passionate as I am about delivering tech transformation within the property industry,” says Iannucci-Dawson (pictured).“We’ve now found a home inside the most innovative property marketplace in the country and, together, we can fulfil our ambitions to transform the way properties are bought and sold.”sales progression platform Riccardo Iannucci-Dawson Yourkeys Zoopla April 26, 2021Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 26th April 2021 at 5:26 pmRic is right, Yourkeys is the definitive proptech solution – a prescribed problem, how to accelerate and transfer of title of properties, in 2021? Build the tech to solve each of the pain points, and digitally deliver the data at the correct time to the correct stakeholder, cut out delay and repitition, and minimise rather than maximum the role of the property professional. Without getting deep into the tech – though I am sure Dan Makin CTO would be happy to discuss this, Yourkeys has scaled up from zero to scale up in four years and now has a multi-million pound exit. We at Proptech-PR have been your advocates since 2019, and back then we knew a big winner when we first saw you, and hope you will get the whole of real estate on rollerskates now ZPG is in the frame.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Pondering energy’s future

first_imgEvery day, the United States sends $1 billion offshore to finance its appetite for fossil fuels, a situation recognized for decades as a threat to national security and energy independence.In 1974, President Richard Nixon was the first in a long line of chief executives to promise reductions in energy from abroad. But the percentage of U.S. oil imports since then has nearly doubled.Meanwhile, fossil fuels are the source of the greenhouse gases blamed for global climate change, an ongoing problem that has engendered another round of presidential promises. The Obama White House recently pledged to reduce such gases 83 percent by 2050, with 2005 as a baseline year.Reducing dependence on foreign oil and reducing greenhouse gases are the two major challenges of U.S. energy systems, a visiting federal energy official told a Harvard audience Tuesday (Sept. 21). To meet these challenges, he said, the government’s best role is to mitigate risk in the energy industry and to leverage innovation.Theoretical physicist Steven Koonin, undersecretary for science at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), opened this year’s Future of Energy lecture series, sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment.Koonin is a rare veteran of all three spheres in the energy puzzle: academe, business, and government. He has been a professor and provost (California Institute of Technology), an industry chief scientist (BP), and since last year a federal bureaucrat. At the DOE, Koonin is the science office’s chief research officer. If you count last year’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, he has influence over $100 million in funding for energy-related research, loans, and loan guarantees.Koonin offered a broad perspective in his session opening the series. Center director and climate scientist Daniel Schrag said that the next lecture — coming Oct. 12 by an executive whose company makes tiny $2,000 cars — will get down to the details of managing Earth’s energy future.Koonin told a capacity crowd at Science Center D that the U.S. energy business is complex, operates by calculating risk and profit in the long term, and approaches innovation slowly and conservatively. After all, he said, any decision on technology will create infrastructures — and costs — that last for decades.“The energy business is not simple,” said Koonin, “and the people in it are not troglodytes.”Nor are they venture capitalists, said Koonin. In that economic sector, risk and innovation are king, but profits get taken fast. “Exit time” is measured in years, not decades. And average funding pools — at $150 million — are not enough to prompt scaled-up change in energy systems. “The energy business,” said Koonin, “is not the venture capital business.”He said government does not have sufficient capital of its own to scale up the needed changes in energy systems, which remain largely in private hands. Change only will happen if it is profitable or mandated, said Koonin. Government tax credits are powerful incentives for change, he said. Wind industry installations went up when the credits were in place, and slipped when the credits disappeared.Government can also play a big role in the essential steps that Koonin outlined to improve energy security and reduce greenhouse gases. Among them:Promote vehicle efficiency. The technology is in hand to increase the fuel efficiency of American cars by 30 percent, for about $2,000 a vehicle.Conserve. Koonin offered “a sense of what is possible” in one example. If all motorists in Texas simply drove at the speed limit, U.S. gas consumption would come down 12 percent.Gradually electrify the U.S. vehicle fleet.Pursue unconventional fuels.Decrease the energy intensity of buildings. Heating, cooling, lighting, and ventilating use 40 percent of U.S. energy.Develop “smart grids” for energy transmission and storage. That means adding digital sensing, measuring, and control devices to increase reliability and efficiency.Set a price for carbon, by cap-and-trade or other means.Explore emerging technologies such as concentrated solar power and carbon capture and storage.Changing energy systems is difficult and slow, said Koonin, who reviewed the historical record from 1850 onward. Industry favors change on “decadal time scales,” he said. The gas-scrubbing systems for coal plants, for instance, took 40 years to develop and perfect.But government can help industry to manage the capital risk of energy innovation, said Koonin, and is already accelerating invention in what he called “a new set of research structures.” These include a network of national labs, the federal “energy hub” concept, and, for short-term projects, the federal Advanced Research Projects Agency — Energy.Koonin’s decades of research often involved large-scale rapid computing, so he sees another bright side to the energy innovation picture: big and fast computer simulations of the kind that in the 1990s were used to replace U.S. nuclear testing. That alone, he said, accelerated computer technology by a factor of 10,000.The same predictive simulation capability can be focused on U.S. energy issues, said Koonin. “We need to do more of this, faster.”last_img read more

A walk in Thoreau’s woods

first_imgWhen ordinary people talk of nature’s colors, they mention browns and oranges. When scientists do, they talk of melanins and carotenoids.Since 2008, the two worlds have met at the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH) in an exhibition that has been both instructive and attractive. “The Language of Color” uses some of nature’s most striking examples — brilliant toucans, hue-changing chameleons, and contrasting zebras — to explore how nature makes color and how animals use it to hide from predators, discourage rivals, and attract mates.The exhibition, which staffers say has been one of the most popular with the public, has occupied the museum’s temporary exhibition gallery long past its original 2009 closing date.After five years, though, the exhibition will close Oct. 7 to make way for a new display of author Henry David Thoreau’s Maine woods, featuring the photographs of Scot Miller. Miller is a nature photographer whose work has illustrated recent editions of two Thoreau books, “Walden: 150th Anniversary Illustrated Edition of the American Classic” and “Cape Cod: Illustrated Edition of the American Classic.”The new exhibition will also include Thoreau-related specimens from the museum’s collections, such as his plant specimens from the Harvard Herbaria and his pencils from the Houghton Library. The opening, scheduled for mid-November, will be accompanied by a lecture series in the fall and spring. In April, a related exhibition will open at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology on Maine’s Penobscot people.Jane Pickering, executive director of the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture, of which the HMNH is part, said that with 200,000 visitors to the museum each year, it’s likely that somewhere around a million people have walked through the color gallery. The exhibition has been particularly popular with teachers bringing their classes to visit, Pickering said, and with art students looking to nature for inspiration.Jonathan Losos, the Monique and Philip Lehner Professor for the Study of Latin America and one of two faculty members whose work is featured in the color exhibition, said that once he saw how well the gallery came together — complete with the dewlaps of the anolis lizards he studies — he wasn’t surprised by its popularity.“It’s spectacular,” Losos said. “I always enjoy walking in and looking at the beautiful graphics, but it’s also exciting to be making room for a new exhibit.”Hopi Hoekstra, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, the other faculty member whose work is highlighted in the color gallery, said she regularly suggests that visitors take a walk through the gallery. One display highlights her research into the evolution and genetic roots of coat color in field mice, and much has changed since it was created.That research, Hoekstra said, launched her lab, which has since tripled in size and branched into related areas. Now, researchers there are examining the genetic roots of animal behavior, along with continued studies on the evolution of coat color.“We started with color because it’s the most direct connection to ecology,” Hoekstra said. “Measuring color is easy; measuring behavior is hard.”last_img read more

Harvard Institute of Politics announces fall fellows

first_imgFormer Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel joins the 2016 class as a visiting fellowCambridge, Mass. – Harvard’s Institute of Politics (IOP), at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, today announced the selection of the 2016 IOP fall resident and visiting fellows.“We have an extraordinary class of Fellows. They are the perfect guides to lead our students through the fascinating terrain of this election year,” said Harvard Institute of Politics Director Maggie Williams. The fellows program is central to the Institute’s dual commitment to encourage student interest in public life and to increase interaction between the academic and political communities. Over the course of an academic semester, resident fellows interact with students, develop and lead weekly study groups and participate in the intellectual life of the Harvard community. Visiting fellows join the Institute for a shorter period and maximize their time meeting with students, faculty and Harvard research center staff.The full list of fellows and their biographies can be found at the link below. Read Full Storylast_img read more

The proof is in the print

first_imgOver the past several years, Harvard Art Museums has acquired hundreds of printer’s proofs of work by celebrated artists, photojournalists, and fashion photographers, in a boon for Harvard holdings of contemporary art. Some of that rich collection is now on display.“Analog Culture: Printer’s Proofs from the Schneider/Erdman Photography Lab, 1981–2001” features approximately 90 black-and-white images from the Manhattan lab of Gary Schneider, an artist, photographer, and master printer, and John Erdman, an artist and expert retoucher.On view through Aug. 12, the exhibit explores the dynamic exchange between artist and printer, the methods and materials used in printmaking, and the social forces that helped shape New York and the nation in the 1980s and ’90s. (The lab closed in 2001.)“For me that range is what really makes the collection significant,” said the show’s curator, Jennifer Quick, Harvard’s John R. and Barbara Robinson Family Associate Research Curator in Photography. “It’s the granular, material history of photography, and the big broader social histories that it documents.”,One of the most haunting images on display is a photograph printed for the American artist and AIDS activist David Wojnarowicz, who died from the disease in 1992 at the age of 37. For many, Wojnarowicz’s shot of buffalo plunging off a cliff — a picture of a diorama he snapped at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington — reflected not just the horror of the AIDS crisis but also the nation’s early apathy toward victims of the disease. The band U2 used the picture as cover art for the single “One,” donating sales to AIDS research.In an interview, Schneider, a filmmaker and photographer by training, said that the choice of a “very bright” French paper called Brilliant helped render Wojnarowicz’s image “holographic.”Becoming a printer was a natural progression for Schneider, who took a job in a photo lab to help him get through grad school at the Pratt Institute in the late 1970s and soon fell in love with darkroom work. Later, at the urging of a friend, he and Erdman, his partner, began printing works for other artists in their apartment in St. Mark’s Place. The spare bedroom doubled as a darkroom; the living room quickly filled with racks of drying prints. Eventually they moved to a studio in Cooper Square. “Even when I am dealing with a student, it’s their voice that I am looking to reveal to them. With an artist, it’s their desire that I’m searching for.” — Gary Schneider,Erdman managed the books, but as the business grew, he also developed into a skilled retoucher. The shop became a regular stop for a who’s who of the East Village art scene. Famed portrait photographer Richard Avedon enlisted Schneider and Erdman to print a set of Beatles images. Madonna sought their expertise for her “Sex” coffee table book, a project that involved nondisclosure agreements and a range of creative voices. Nan Goldin, Peter Hujar, Lisette Model, and James Casebere, among many other noted artists, were regulars.,Through the years, Schneider’s own gift with the camera helped inform how he translated an artist’s negative to a finished print. He likened his work to a kind of performance in which he channeled the ideas of others, using his experience and creative eye to develop options for clients whom he insisted arrive prepared.“If they didn’t have a vision for the work I wasn’t going to create one for them,” he said. “I couldn’t.”What he could do was deliver “a number of choices or alternatives,” by selecting the right combinations of paper, ink, toner, and developer, and by deciding how long to expose a work to enhance shadows or highlights.“Even when I am dealing with a student, it’s their voice that I am looking to reveal to them,” said Schneider. “With an artist, it’s their desire that I’m searching for.”The printing process is about “how far can I actually catalyze that artist’s voice or that artist’s desire rather than my own,” he said.,Archival material, books, and an Irene Bayer photo from Schneider and Erdman’s personal collection are part of the exhibit, along with key darkroom items such as test prints, a light valve technology negative, and “masks” — material used to cover an area of a print to limit its exposure time. All help shine a light on Schneider and Erdman’s process.Ensuring the collection would be housed at an institution devoted to teaching and learning was key for the pair, who led various demonstrations and discussions with Harvard students in the months before the exhibition.“We always viewed the collection as a study collection,” said Erdman, who accompanied Schneider to Harvard in 2004 for the installation of “Gary Schneider: Portraits.”It was during that visit that they were struck by the Fogg Art Museum’s Agnes Mongan Center for the Study of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, and its commitment to teaching. “We fantasized about [our collection] coming here,” said Erdman.last_img read more

Pure Storage’s Evergreen Storage Program – A Marketing Solution to Engineering Problems

first_imgLet’s break down each Evergreen Gold ‘feature’ and see what it provides, why it’s needed and the hidden costs and issues you won’t hear about from Pure.Now let’s compare Pure’s Evergreen Gold approach to Dell EMC’s Future Proof approach for the most common customer scenarios.Find more details on Dell EMC’s full Future Proof customer loyalty program here!So, what have we learned about Pure’s Evergreen Gold?Free Every Three: Free Every Three is not ‘free’. We learned that you need to buy Evergreen Gold just to qualify and need to renew Evergreen Gold for another 3 years, 6 years total, to get the ‘free’ controllers. In many ways Free Every Three is really just a form of ‘pre-payment’ for the controllers you may need after 3 years.Upgrade Flex & Capacity Consolidation: At their essence, both Upgrade Flex and Capacity Consolidation are both REBUY programs.  You are buying newer controllers and capacity to replace what you have already purchased.  This is the very thing Pure says their Evergreen Storage avoids.  Just because Pure claims to provide ‘some’ credit for the replaced controllers and/or capacity doesn’t change the fact it is still a rebuy program.Our recommendation: do your homework and don’t be afraid to ask Pure some hard questions about their Evergreen Gold subscription…Questions to Ask PureCan you show me exactly how much Evergreen Gold’s Free Every Three will save me versus Evergreen Silver and simply buying new controllers IF I ever need them?Can you explain how I am not essentially ‘rebuying’ controllers and/or capacity, with trade-in credits, when I use Upgrade Flex or Capacity Consolidation?Can you explain why I need to purchase more capacity when I use Upgrade Flex to get faster controllers?Why do I need to purchase a new Evergreen Gold 3 year subscription to use Upgrade Flex?Watch for more detailed blogs de-mystifying Pure’s Evergreen Gold program and comparisons of how it stacks up to Dell EMC’s Future Proof Loyalty Program.For information on Dell EMC’s storage solutions click here.For details of Dell EMC’s Future Proof Data Storage Loyalty Program click here. Pure Storage (“Pure”) makes a lot of noise about their Evergreen Storage program.  With bold claims like “never rebuy a TB you’ve purchased, never do a data migration again and never do another forklift upgrade”, but the devil, and more importantly, the customer costs are in the details.  We think after reviewing the facts you will come to the same conclusions we have.  At its core Evergreen Storage – in our opinion –  is a marketing program with features designed to overlook architectural shortcomings by focusing on specific customer benefits, while netting Pure high profit margins and locking in customers!Why Did Pure Need to Invent the Evergreen Storage ProgramPure continuously markets that Evergreen isn’t just a program it’s also how they engineer their FlashArray product.  To keep their FlashArray product design simple to upgrade, while keeping data in place, they had to make some architectural choices that would enable that goal.  However, along with those architectural decisions came some inherent limitations that they needed to market and sell around.  This is where the Evergreen Storage comes into playSo, what are some of the architectural decisions Pure made a long time ago to enable their ‘evergreen’ storage, for the FlashArray product line, and what are some of the consequences of those decisions?Architectural DecisionsPure chose to use a dual controller active-passive architecture, which dramatically simplifies their design goal of being able to do Data-In-Place controller upgrades with no down time.  They simply upgrade the passive controller first, then make it the active controller so they can upgrade the other controller.To get around some of their inherent performance issues, Pure now uses their own proprietary NVMe flash modules (X50, X70, X90), instead of industry standard flash drives, which means that they now have to do all the flash memory management, which can further affect performance.Consequences of Those DecisionsPerformance is bottlenecked by how powerful the one active controller is. Remember, that single active controller must handle all normal controller activity as well as do all the management of their proprietary flash modules.  The only way to increase horsepower is by upgrading the controller.  Are you starting to see the need for the Evergreen Gold Program now (Free-Every-Three, Upgrade Flex)?Scaling capacity is limited by how much capacity a FlashArray’s single active controller can manage and the amount of flash modules its able to support.Once you max out the amount of capacity the FlashArray can handle, the only way to scale capacity any higher is by swapping higher capacity flash modules into the system to replace the lower capacity flash modules.So, how does Pure get around these limitations while trying to make money along the way?  Yep, you guessed it, Evergreen Gold and its 3 ‘pay-as-you-grow’ features – Free Every Three, Upgrade Flex and Capacity Consolidation.What Exactly are Pure’s Evergreen Storage Claimslast_img read more

The Next 20

first_imgTwenty years ago when I started working at Outside magazine, I transcribed faxed story drafts into the computer because our office didn’t have external email. I read story edits on paper, which made the Number Two pencil the number one office tool. Jon Krakauer hadn’t yet climbed Mount Everest, “An Inconvenient Truth” was still 11 years away, and it was still possible to get lost in the wilderness without selfie documentation. My favorite piece of gear was a hot-pink, hard-tail Specialized Stumpjumper that cost approximately $8,800 less than the $9,300 S-Works Stumpjumper 29er advertised on Specialized’s website today. Instead of two short decades, it seems that eons have passed.What will the next 20 years bring? Considering that some people wonder if we’ll still have an inhabitable planet by the year 2047, it feels a little dubious to make any predictions beyond tomorrow. On the other hand, the future, as Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”I polled a few of the smartest people I know in the outdoor industry to find out what they think the future of travel, gear, and recreation holds. Then I added a few of my own predictions, ranging from fact-based reporting to pure fantasy, to create a list of 20. Some predictions may sound far-fetched, but the beauty of the future is that anything is possible—and nothing can be fact-checked.Outdoor Recreation “It is predicted that by 2050, 86 percent of the developed world will be urbanized with people living in dense communities. This shift will transform how we enjoy the outdoors. Close-to-home outdoor recreation will dominate. State and local governments will integrate parks, open space and trail systems into their city planning.” –Steve Barker, Interim Executive Director, Outdoor Industry Association“Outdoor recreation is going to continue its arc away from being just about big trips in remote wilderness and towards accessible experiences we can all have, even within cities. It has to go that way if we’re going to continue to engage new communities, from urban youth to urban professionals. Call it the democratization of adventure.” –Michael Roberts, Executive Editor, Digital Development, Outside MagazineGear“Light and fast will define the next 20 years of outdoor adventure and exploration. It will be the single biggest advancement to empower professional mountain athletes and dedicated global adventurers. With the ongoing evolution of outdoor products each season —from hard goods to performance apparel—that are weighing in lighter than ever before and creating more efficient systems, people are able to go greater distances in far less time, pushing the limits of what’s possible. Gear weight reduction alone in the past 20 years has allowed athletes to crash through their own (previous) training ceilings. Weight reduction and product innovation have opened the adventure door for the masses—not just a select few.”–Jordan Campbell, writer, mountaineer, filmmaker, and Marmot ambassador athlete“No matter if it is skiing, climbing, trail running or biking, gear will morph into a place where speed, lightness, technology, and performance will become one. The new GORE Surround technology (waterproof, breathable footwear with open construction on the bottom of the sole) is the perfect example of making something out of nothing.” –Eric Henderson, former backcountry ski guide for Jackson Hole Mountain Resort and communications manager for Salewa mountaineering products“Living in denser environments with less space will change how we buy products. Consumers will shift from a more, more, more mentality to buying less of higher quality items with more crossover lifestyle usages. There’s more opportunity to buy recycled and refurbished goods. This will be more important to future generations.” –Steve Barker“Sports like Nordic skiing that require snow have morphed into much less of a natural environment and more into a manufactured environment meant to look like what that natural environment used to be. You’re going to see reflections of that in the equipment: Ski bases will be more dirt repellent, poles will have reinforced tips to withstand the impact of shorter races, and ski waxes will be more concentrated around the freezing range because there’s more man-made snow and the temperature of man-made snow is right around freezing.” –Andrew Gardner, former Nordic skiing coach at Middlebury College and Nordic skiing PR professionalTravel“Well, I did try to acquire the URL www.timetravel.com, but the issuing organization would not sell it to me. No doubt because they know time travel is almost here and I would go back and create the Internet first! On a more serious note—the number of travelers, especially from Asia, is set to explode in volume. Destinations that do not take this seriously, starting now, will likely have significant problems with loss of both cultural authenticity and environment. In other words, those who plan for this volume now to spread it out, mitigate it, and control it will be the long-term winners. To do nothing is an active decision to have massive problems in 20 years.” –Shannon Stowell, President, The Adventure Travel Trade AssociationTechnology“Technology has already changed the ethos. Pure adventure will always be possible, especially with the absence of technology. But the combination of wireless communication and social media will continue to alter what the adventure finish line should look like. Some of it will be fantastic with real-time and enormous participation, but you can also count on some of it becoming utterly contrived and truly abhorrent. We will have to decide on what is real, genuine, and valued in our tribe—and what is not.” –Jordan CampbellGlobal Stewardship“The marriage of adventure with altruism will continue to play a more significant role in the 21st century. Giving back to underserved populations across the globe is part of a new moral imperative in the outdoor adventure space. It is no longer a sidebar activity for a dedicated few; rather it has become an end unto itself and part of the adventure space.” –Jordan Campbell, writer, filmmaker, and Marmot ambassador athleteSpirituality“I envision there will be a large resurgence back to nature similar to the Muir and Teddy Roosevelt era. Living in crowded environments with lives driven by electronics will create a strong desire for people across the country to go outside as a spiritual and health experience.” –Steve BarkerState of Mind“I still see adventure as a state of mind that constantly tugs at us to step into the unknown. That won’t change in the next 20 years. You either follow a script or you blaze your own trail.”–Jordan CampbellMy PredictionsSurfing the jet stream will normalize five-hour flights across the Atlantic. In January, a British Airways Boeing 777-200 made the New York to London route in five hours, 16 minutes, reaching ground speeds of up to 745 miles per hour by riding a powerful jet stream of up to 200 mile-per-hour tailwinds.Über Brands: With the recent unveiling of its “luxury hotels collection,” National Geographic is the latest publishing company that has taken branding to extreme heights: Fans can now view the world entirely through the National Geographic lens of magazines, books, websites, vacations, guides, and hotels. Hopefully Fox News will not be following suit.Two-Wheeled Transportation: Whether you prefer a 45-day, seven-country cycling trip from Paris to Moscow or sharing one of 66,500 public bicycles in Hangzhou, China, which has the largest bike-sharing system in the world, self-powered pedaling will change the way we get to work and see the world.The Bed-to-Bike-to-Work-to-Cocktails-to-Dinner-to-Bed Outfit: Natural and synthetic fabrics will be so sophisticated that they won’t wrinkle, smell from sweat, sag, or get dirty. And the blurred line between workout and work apparel will completely disappear.Lab-concocted, plant-protein-based performance meals will replace our favorite junk food.“Firsts” will become increasingly outrageous. Soon I’m expecting to see the first human summit of Mount Everest while simultaneously becoming the World Champion of Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter video game.Need a tan in January? A bigger wave to surf? Not to worry. Perhaps only in my mind, personal weather-providing drones, programmable from snowstorm to 75-degree bluebird sky day, will be as ubiquitous as smart phones.Life on a planet we never knew existed: NASA predicts that we are within 20 years of finding evidence of extraterrestrial life. Let’s hope they are friendly.The Language of Adventure: If politicians, corporations, and private citizens don’t all do their part in shoring up climate change, the term “adventure” will soon become synonymous with “survival.”–S.P.last_img read more

Arsenal and Tottenham in race to sign Dries Mertens from Napoli

first_img Comment Advertisement Mertens could be available on a free transfer next summer (Getty Images)According to Il Mattino, both Arsenal and Tottenham have registered their interest in signing Mertens.The report claims that both Premier League sides have ‘taken information’ on Mertens ahead of a potential move.AdvertisementAdvertisementBut Juventus, AC Milan and Inter are also reportedly interested in signing the Belgian.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CitySpeaking about his future last month, Mertens admitted he could leave Napoli at the end of the season.‘I still don’t know what my future will be,’ he said.‘My objective right now is to have a very good season with Napoli. Then we’ll see how things go. There’s still some time left until the end of the season.‘Here at Napoli, I still have seven months left on my contract. I don’t know where I’ll be playing next season.‘At the end of this year, I’ll assess whether to renew my contract or not, but it’s still too early. I’m not in a position to rule anything out.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisement Arsenal and Tottenham in race to sign Dries Mertens from Napoli Dries Mertens is wanted by Arsenal and Tottenham (SIPA USA/PA Images)Arsenal and Tottenham are in the race to sign Dries Mertens from Napoli, according to reports.The 32-year-old’s current contract with the Serie A club expires at the end of the season and he is yet to agree a new deal.Mertens is currently in his seventh season at Napoli and is a key part of their attack with 116 goals for the Italian club.But Napoli risk losing the Belgium international next summer with several clubs lining up for his signature.ADVERTISEMENT Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 13 Nov 2019 11:09 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy linklast_img read more

Pensioners pushed out of Gold Coast property market

first_imgBrent Martens said rental prices have skyrocketed. Picture Mike Batterham“I had two owners who have recently sold and are looking to rent for a year or two, and they are shocked at how much rent has increased in even just a couple of years,” he said.CoreLogic shows the median house rental price on the Gold Coast has increased to $530 in the last twelve months to August, 2017, an increase of almost four per cent.Units are up to $410, an increase of 3.79 per cent. Demand far outweighs supply of rental accommodation. Picture: NIGEL HALLETT“We were not surprised by the affordability issues on the Gold Coast, as identified by the National Shelter report,” she said. “However, we do expect a small reprieve once the Comm Games have passed. The accommodation built for the Games will be converted to student accommodation and this will go some way to easing those tight conditions in this market, albeit briefly.”The REIQ agreed there was a need for more affordable accommodation for pensioners. Most of the Gold Coast is reportedly unaffordable. (AAP Image/Dave Hunt)National Shelter executive officer Adrian Pisarski said the report showed “most of the Gold Coast is moderately unaffordable” to an average annual household income of $80,000.“When you drop the income down to $60,000 a year, the whole of the Gold Coast is unaffordable to severely unaffordable to renters,” Mr Pisarski said.Real Estate Institute of Queensland CEO Antonia Mercorella said the Gold Coast vacancy rate is 1.9 per cent in the September quarter and the market remains in tight range with demand for rental accommodation outstripping supply. It’s beautiful, but it costs more than a pretty penny to rent here.PENSIONERS are the worst hit by the Gold Coast rental crisis, as rents surge across the city.New figures in the national Rental Affordability Index revealed Surfers Paradise, Southport and Robina lead “extremely unaffordable” suburbs for single pensioners receiving $25,000 in benefits a year.center_img Anne Parker has launched her own website to help other battling renters.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North1 hour ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa21 hours agoMs Parker is now looking to rent in a senior sharehouse with many other women in her position.“It’s just not feasible, everyone is getting squeezed out of the market,” Ms Parker said. “Prices have gone up astronomically.”But it’s not just seniors doing it tough. Harcourts Coastal business development manager Brent Martens said all rentals in a 10km radius of Surfers Paradise have skyrocketed. An aerial view of residential apartments and housing on the Gold Coast , Wednesday, May 17, 2017. (AAP Image/Dave Hunt) NO ARCHIVINGAnne Parker spent 35 years on the Gold Coast, working in IT for Gold Coast City Council and police prosecution.But the mother-of-three is now living with her aunty in an Eagleby retirement village, after she fell sick and was forced to retire.“Life has changed from being independent to begging,” Ms Parker, 52, said. “I’ve been struggling ever since, I’ve been homeless.”last_img read more