Category: ezjhxssd

Kamasi Washington Stands With Standing Rock Protesters Despite Worsening Conditions

first_imgKeep up the good work, Kamasi. The situation at Standing Rock Native American Reservation continues to worsen, as many who are there report the use of water cannons and chemical attacks on peaceful protesters during 25 degree weather. Musicians and celebrities have been rallying in support for Standing Rock, including rising superstar Kamasi Washington. Washington made his way to the North Dakota protest site, where he personally witnessed some of these inhumane attacks firsthand.Kamasi Washington posted the following to his Instagram to chronicle the events.last_img read more

Editing the genome

first_imgThe power to edit genes is as revolutionary, immediately useful, and unlimited in its potential as was Johannes Gutenberg’s printing press. And like Gutenberg’s invention, most DNA editing tools are slow, expensive, and hard to use — a brilliant technology in its infancy. Now, Harvard researchers developing genome-scale editing tools as fast and easy as word processing have rewritten the genome of living cells using the genetic equivalent of search and replace — and combined those rewrites in novel cell strains, strikingly different from their forebears.“The payoff doesn’t really come from making a copy of something that already exists,” said George Church, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School who led the research effort in collaboration with Joe Jacobson, an associate professor at the Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “You have to change it — functionally and radically.”Such change, Church said, serves three goals. The first is to add functionality to a cell by encoding for useful new amino acids. The second is to introduce safeguards that prevent cross-contamination between modified organisms and the wild. A third, related aim, is to establish multiviral resistance by rewriting code hijacked by viruses. In industries that cultivate bacteria, including pharmaceuticals and energy, such viruses affect up to 20 percent of cultures. A notable example afflicted the biotech company Genzyme, where estimates of losses due to viral contamination range from a few hundred million dollars to more than $1 billion.In a paper scheduled for publication July 15 in Science, the researchers describe how they replaced instances of a codon — a DNA “word” of three nucleotide letters — in 32 strains of E. coli, and then coaxed those partially edited strains along an evolutionary path toward a single cell line in which all 314 instances of the codon had been replaced.That many edits surpasses current methods by two orders of magnitude, said Harris Wang, a research fellow in Church’s lab at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering who shares lead-author credit on the paper with Farren Isaacs, an assistant professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology at Yale University and a former Harvard research fellow, and Peter Carr, a research scientist at the MIT Media Lab.In the genetic code, most codons specify an amino acid, a protein building block. But a few codons tell the cell when to stop adding amino acids to a protein chain, and it was one of these “stop” codons that the Harvard researchers targeted. With just 314 occurrences, the TAG stop codon is the rarest word in the E. coli genome, making it a prime target for replacement. Using a platform called multiplex automated genome engineering, or MAGE, the team replaced instances of the TAG codon with another stop codon, TAA, in living E. coli cells. (Unveiled by the team in 2009, the MAGE process has been called an evolution machine for its ability to accelerate targeted genetic change in living cells.)While MAGE, a small-scale engineering process, yielded cells in which TAA codons replaced some but not all TAG codons, the team constructed 32 strains that, taken together, included every possible TAA replacement. Then, using bacteria’s innate ability to trade genes through a process called conjugation, the researchers induced the cells to transfer genes containing TAA codons at increasingly larger scales. The new method, called conjugative assembly genome engineering, or CAGE, resembles a playoff bracket — a hierarchy that winnows 16 pairs to eight to four to two to one — with each round’s winner possessing more TAA codons and fewer TAG, explains Isaacs, who invokes “March Madness.”“We’re testing decades-old theories on the conservation of the genetic code,” Isaacs said. “And we’re showing on a genomewide scale that we’re able to make these changes.”Eager to share their enabling technology, the team published their results as CAGE reached the semifinal round. Results suggested that the final four strains were healthy, even as the team assembled four groups of 80 engineered alterations into stretches of the chromosome surpassing 1 million DNA base pairs. “We encountered a great deal of skepticism early on that we could make so many changes and preserve the health of these cells,” Carr said. “But that’s what we’ve seen.”The researchers are confident that they will create a single strain in which TAG codons are completely eliminated. The next step, they say, is to delete the cell’s machinery that reads the TAG gene — freeing up the codon for a completely new purpose, such as encoding a novel amino acid.“We’re trying to challenge people,” Wang said, “to think about the genome as something that’s highly malleable, highly editable.”This research was funded by U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.last_img read more

Senior Class Council tickets vie for votes

first_imgTwo tickets will compete to be elected to the executive board for Senior Class Council. Elections will take place today from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., according to Judicial Council. Because tickets for Junior Class Council and Sophomore Class Council ran unopposed, they were declared winners by Student Senate last Wednesday.Eric Richelsen Senior Class CouncilKatelyn Wray, Clare Geraghty, Zach Bequette and Celanire Flagg designed their platform to focus on four main pillars — experiencing the city of South Bend, providing outlets for students to develop professionally, building lasting memories with friends and leaving a class-wide legacy at Notre Dame.“Utilizing the diversity of the senior class, we strive to have programs that bring the entire community together and create opportunities for people who may no longer be involved through dorm life,” Wray, the ticket’s presidential candidate, said in an email. Wray said the ticket has identified events affiliated with each pillar that are both feasible and innovative, including a signature class of 2017 event during Antostal, a class service day and an event for seniors to take professional headshots to use in résumés or portfolios.“Remember how fun Hip-Hop Night was freshman year? We are going to make Legends great again with Senior Night. Live music, cheap drinks and all of our friends in one place — Legends, as Legends was meant to be,” she said.Wray, Geraghty and Flagg all served on Sophomore Class Council, and Wray currently serves as vice president of Junior Class Council. Geraghty, the ticket’s vice presidential candidate, now serves as Cavanaugh Hall president. Bequette serves on the Club Coordination Council, which allocates funds to student groups on campus and facilitates University-club interactions, in addition to being a member of the officer board of the club sailing team.Geraghty said the ticket’s top priority is to foster a tight-knit class community, despite the fact many seniors live off campus.“It can be difficult to have class cohesion when everyone has such diverse involvement and interests within the Notre Dame community,” she said. “ … It is our goal to extend our reach to the entire class by putting on events that all members of the class will genuinely enjoy. We are dedicated to bringing the class together for a final year under the dome and making memories to last a lifetime.”The other ticket for Senior Class Council consists of Patrick Tinsley, Noelle Gooding, Jake Dunigan and Andrew Thomas. The campaign said the central theme of its platform is “the notion of building bridges.”“Senior year, for many, represents a number of separations — separating from your on-campus friends if you move off campus, separating from college life when you graduate and separations between different aspects of Notre Dame student life as a whole,” Tinsley, the ticket’s presidential candidate, said in an email. “Our goal is to bridge those separations.”The ticket hopes to work with University administration to improve the shuttle system to and from off-campus housing sites and designate certain parking spots closer to academic buildings for off-campus students for a limited period of time during the day, Tinsley said.“At the core of our platform lies a tremendous respect for next year’s graduating class,” he said. “As to-be seniors ourselves, we respect the remaining time we have at this university, time that should be used most effectively during our last year.”Tinsley said that if elected, the ticket also plans to host regional mixers that would allow students to meet classmates that plan to work in the same city after graduation.“Meeting some other soon-to-be Notre Dame alums who also will be living in an area might help ease that transition and provide you with a built-in network of friends before you ever arrive at your job,” he said.No members of the ticket have served on a class council before, which Tinsley said would allow the group to provide a fresh perspective to the role. Tinsley served as the Transfer Welcome Weekend co-commissioner last fall and is currently the Student Union Board representative for Alumni Hall and a dorm judicial council member. Gooding is president of Notre Dame’s branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and has been active in her dorm’s hall council in the past. Dunigan co-founded and is currently vice president of Notre Dame’s chapter of Young Americans for Freedom, while Thomas currently serves as the Stanford Hall senator.The ultimate goal of the ticket is to bring seniors together with events like class Grotto trips, service projects, South Bend Cubs games, a senior class formal and a revamped Senior Week, Tinsley said.“It’s our last ride — we want to make it count,” he said. “Four years is all we get with our friends, roommates and fellow Domers. In recognition of the fleeting nature of our college years, we are hoping to provide several events for the senior class as a whole to better cherish and appreciate our final year together.”Junior Class CouncilSara Dugan, Janet Stengle, Paul Stevenson and Matthew Peters said they hope to foster a sense of unity between members of the junior class, both on campus and in study abroad locations.“For the first time since we have gotten to Notre Dame, our class will be significantly separated,” Peters, who will assume the position of secretary, said in an email. “We will be divided by oceans, with students studying in countries across the globe. Furthermore, our class will be significantly subdivided into their respective majors. For these reasons and many more, it is not hard for the junior class to appear divided or fragmented. It is our goal to mitigate these effects.”The executive board plans to increase advertising for class council events, such as South Bend Cubs games and brother-sister dorm Olympics, to increase participation and maintain accountability, Dugan, Junior Class Council president-elect, said.“Junior Year is a unique time for students at Notre Dame,” she said. “As the Junior Class Council executive board, we really want to focus our efforts on catering specifically to those unique qualities. In addition, we hope to bring the Junior Class Council’s events to the attention of campus by staying visible, both online and around campus, and to stay accountable to our goals by adhering to the plans we make at the beginning of our term.”Dugan currently serves as Parliamentarian for the Ricketts-Ruelas administration and works as a student assistant in the Student Activities Office. Both Stengle and Stevenson served on Freshman Class Council and Sophomore Class Council. Stevenson also works for the Orientation Steering Committee and the University Communications Department. Peters has had no student government experience. Stengle, who will serve as vice president, said they plan to restructure Junior Class Council based on feedback and experiences from previous years.“Our goal is to assign task forces during the council application process based on work style, strengths and personalities to ensure that each event is executed to its fullest potential,” she said. “This will also allow for members of the council to hold greater responsibility and to build camaraderie through collaboration.”Sophomore Class CouncilMichael Conlon, Mary Ninneman, Jane Driano and Chris Lembo said they hope to recognize the diversity of their class and use it to bring people together during the upcoming year.“We would like to be a more open class council,” Conlon, who will assume the role of president, said in an email. “It is our responsibility to serve our constituents in the class of 2019 and to promote their ideas in future decision-making.”Conlon said his executive board plans to host events that promote class unity through prayer, service and fun.“There is no better instrument of unification than serving our South Bend community,” he said. “Additionally, we will offer opportunities to reflect on our Notre Dame experience together.”All four members on the ticket serve as officers on the current Freshmen Class Council, Conlon said. “With our previous student government involvement and individual interests, we look forward to serving our class for another year to the best of our abilities,” he said. “We have formed extensive connections in the Notre Dame administration and the other class councils, and we look forward to collaborating with and expanding our network to further foster community within our class.”Tags: class council elections, junior class council, senior class council, sophomore class council, Student governmentlast_img read more

13th annual Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon raises money for Riley Hospital

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Theresa McSorley This year, the Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon became the fifth dance marathon in Indiana to raise $1,000,000 over the course of its history. The event’s funds support Riley Hospital for Children.Dance Marathon members begin fundraising at the beginning of each academic year to support the Riley Hospital for Children, senior and operations co-executive Theresa McSorley said.In the past, Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon has had several high schools who fundraised to help reach the group’s goal, but this year was different due to having just one high school participate, senior and Dance Marathon president Meg Brownley said in an email.McSorley said this decrease affected fundraising for the event.“We lost a lot of high schools that bring in major parts of fundraising for Dance Marathon this year,” she said.Despite this setback, members of the club knew they wanted to have an exceptionally good year because Saint Mary’s was set to have raised a total of $1,000,000 during its years participating in Dance Marathon.“We are the fifth Dance Marathon in the state of Indiana to reach a cumulative total of $1,000,000,” Brownley said.Executives of the club attribute this achievement to more involvement from the surrounding community.“This year, we had a 30 percent increase in fundraising compared to last year,” Brownley said.This increase came from the individual members of the club who began their fundraising in August, as well as the more than 300 people who registered to participate in Dance Marathon.“It helped that we opened it up to Notre Dame and Holy Cross students to really advertise our Dance Marathon on their campuses,” senior and personal relations executive Alaina Murphy said.The event itself lasted 12 hours — time the operations committee arranged to be filled with entertainment that included a performance by Bellacapella — the Saint Mary’s acapella group — animals from the Potawatomi Zoo, visits from Notre Dame baseball and football players and face painting.“We’re so grateful for all the groups from the tri-campus community that came,” Corcoran said. “It shows that our sense of community is strong.”During the time of the 12-hour marathon, the organization raised about $27,000, Murphy said.Patients at the Riley Children’s Hospital and their families attended the event and shared stories of how the hospital’s care has impacted their family, junior and letter-writing executive for the organization Grace Ward said.McSorley said this visit was a Dance Marathon tradition.“Every year, the Riley kids come, and either they or their parents speak and tell their stories,” McSorley said.Seeing the children benefitting from the fundraising makes participating in Dance Marathon an emotional experience for some, McSorley said.“People think you’re just dancing for 12 hours, but it’s so much more than that,” McSorley said. “It sounds so painful, but the minute you sit down after that 12 hours, you realize that the pain you feel is nothing compared to what those kids go through.”Tags: Dance Marathon, Pfeil Center, riley hospital, riley hospital for children, Saint Mary’s College Dance Marathon, SMC Dance Marathon Members of the tri-campus community gathered at the Pfeil Center at Holy Cross College on Saturday for this year’s Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon.This was the 13th year the fundraising club has hosted the event for the Saint Mary’s community, and its theme was “Get Wild for the Life of a Child,” according to junior Madeleine Corcoran, co-executive of operations for the club.last_img read more

Second Severed Arm Found in Hempstead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A second severed arm was found in Hempstead a half mile from a similar discovery made a day prior—two days after a dismembered woman’s body was found in Bay Shore, police said.Hempstead village police confirmed that a 911 caller reported finding the second body part on Stewart Avenue near the corner of Cornell Street at 4:30 p.m. Thursday.Suffolk County police confirmed that homicide squad detectives crossed the county line to respond to the scene, same as they did the day before.Nassau County police declined to comment, but the department’s homicide and third squad are investigating, authorities said.The first arm was found near the corner of Webb Avenue and Washington Street at 2 p.m. Wednesday, police have said.A day before that and 22 miles away, two people walking to the Fire Island ferry terminal found an unidentified dead woman’s partially dismembered body in a vacant lot on the corner of Gilson Street and Maple Avenue on Tuesday morning, police have said.Suffolk medical examiners are performing an autopsy on the woman’s remains to determine her identity and cause of death. Nassau medical examiners were examining the first arm, although authorities did not say where the second arm was taken. It is unclear if the three sets of remains belong to the same person.Suffolk police have also said that they dispatched their K-9 units to the Gilgo Beach area as a precaution, but added that they have no evidence of a link between the Bay Shore discovery and the unsolved Gilgo Beach murders.last_img read more

Winter Storm May Bring Foot of Snow to Parts of Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York More than a foot of snow is forecast for parts of the East End with four to six inches for western Long Island, meteorologists warned Saturday as a winter storm hit the area.The highest accumulations are likely to be on the South Fork, although the storm is forecast to bring heavy snow, 30-mph gusts and temperatures in the 20s to all of LI, the National Weather Service said in a winter storm warning issued for Nassau and Suffolk counties through midnight. The conditions are expected to make for slippery roadways and reduce visibility to a quarter mile, making for hazardous travel conditions.“The best practice right now is to stay off the roads,” Suffolk County Police Commissioner Timothy Sini told reporters Saturday during a news conference. Noting that there were already 20 vehicle crashes at the start of the storm around 11 a.m., he said those he must drive should reduce their speed and leave enough room between vehicles to stop.The storm is impacting much of the East Coast. Parts of New York City and the tri-state area are also under a winter storm warning. The storm is the first major snowstorm of winter and of 2017, although it fell short of more serious blizzard conditions.The heaviest part of the snow is expected during the early afternoon before it tapers off this evening. NWS officials noted that anyone who must drive should bring food, water and a flashlight in case of emergency.Nassau and Suffolk county officials as well as smaller local municipalities said they are deploying hundreds of snow plows to clear and salt roadways island-wide. Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone said if there is any silver lining, it’s that the storm hit on a weekend when most people are off from work and can stay home.“It is fortunate that the storm is occurring on a Saturday,” Bellone said, encouraging residents to make it a family day. “It’s always easier when the roads are clear.”last_img read more

Tioga County Chamber names new president & CEO

first_imgHe was also on the Board of Directors from 2015 to 2019. Andrew Hafer was named the new president and CEO. Roseann Cole, Chairman of the Board of Directors said, “[Hafer] is such an asset to our community and the Chamber is pleased and excited to have him on board.” OWEGO (WBNG) — The Tioga County Chamber of Commerce announced a new president and CEO Monday morning. He worked with Tioga Opportunities since 2007 and served as the Energy Services Director, Community Services and Operations Manager. Hafer will replace current Chamber President and CEO Gwen Kania. Kania has served as president and CEO since 2014 and worked in the chamber for over a decade. Hafer starts his role as president and CEO on May 29.last_img read more

Granny busted for cocaine makes history in Trinidad

first_img Sharing is caring! NewsRegional Granny busted for cocaine makes history in Trinidad by: – June 15, 2012 Share Share Tweetcenter_img Seventy-one-year-old Grace Pierre-Holder is the oldest person ever jailed in Trinidad for attempted drug trafficking..PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad, Friday June 15, 2012 – Seventy-one-year-old Grace Pierre-Holder may have landed herself in the slammer for the next six years, but the old gal did so in style, making history as the oldest person in Trinidad to be jailed for attempting to leave Piarco International Airport with cocaine in her possession for the purpose of trafficking 12 years ago.The silver-haired grandmother’s 29-year-old co-accused, Daenah John-Finn, carved her own niche as the youngest Trinidad national on record to be charged in an airport case in relation to possession of cocaine.The elderly Pierre-Holder, of Simon Street, Gasparillo was ordered to serve six years simple imprisonment, while John-Finn, of Old Southern Main Road, Claxton Bay Junction, Claxton Bay, was sentenced to five years with hard labour.The sentences were handed down by Justice Carla Brown-Antoine in the Fifth Criminal Court at the Hall of Justice in Port of Spain.Both women were found guilty of the offence on May 3, but sentencing was postponed to allow their attorneys to make pleas of mitigation on their behalf.Leading evidence on behalf of the State were attorneys Renuka Rambhajan and Taterani Seecharan while Pierre-Holder was represented by Senior Counsel Theodore Guerra and attorney John Heath.John-Finn was represented by attorneys Ravi Rajcoomar and Jenna Lucky-Samaroo.Pierre-Holder and John-Finn were among a group of four arrested at Piarco International Airport while waiting to board an American Airlines flight to London via Miami on February 10, 2000.All appeared to be mooching along smoothly until police officers discovered they had packages of cocaine concealed in the male Clarks leather shoes they were wearing.All four were scheduled to return to Trinidad on February 13, 2000, but neither they nor their now-famous shoes ever left the ground.Pierre-Holder’s daughter Michelle Leslie and John-Finn’s boyfriend Jason Connell were the other members of the well-heeled group.Connell was found guilty on May 11, 2006 at the Arima Magistrate’s Court and ordered to pay $25,000 forthwith or serve three years in prison. The fine was paid. Leslie pleaded guilty on January 30, 2008 and was fined $50,000 by an Arima Magistrate.In passing sentences on Pierre-Holder and John-Finn, the judge said those involved were part of a very carefully planned operation.She went on to disagree with the assertion by made by Pierre-Holder’s attorney that his client’s age was a mitigating factor.“Age should bring wisdom and society expects that our more mature citizens would be an example to our younger ones. To put it plainly, (she) should have known better,” Brown-Antoine said.Caribbean 360 News 82 Views   2 comments Sharelast_img read more

La Liga: Bale returns as Real Madrid come from behind to beat Osasuna

first_imgGareth Bale returned to the team and Real Madrid came back to beat Osasuna on Sunday as a 4-1 victory in Pamplona strengthened their hold on top spot in La Liga.Bale had been left out completely for Madrid’s previous four matches but the Welshman returned to the squad and the starting line-up at El Sadar, in a surprise show of faith from coach Zinedine Zidane.Gareth Bale made his third start of the year in Real Madrid’s 4-1 win over Osasuna in La Liga on SundayA fortuitous deflection meant Bale assisted Isco’s equaliser too before Sergio Ramos put Madrid in front after Unai Garcia had given Osasuna an early lead.Substitutes Lucas Vazquez and Luka Jovic then scored from late breakaways as Real pulled six points clear of Barcelona, who play at Real Betis later on Sunday.“I’m pleased with all the players and what they’re doing,” said Zidane. “It’s very good to stay in front.”Barca’s exit in the Copa del Rey overshadowed Madrid’s own shock defeat at home by Real Sociedad in the quarter-finals, a loss that brought a dramatic end to their 21-match unbeaten run.But Zidane will be relieved to see his team swiftly back on track with a performance full of the kind of resilience that Real’s rivals have so lacked in recent weeks.Bale also keeps coming back under Zidane and the 30-year-old had chances to add a goal to a spirited display before going off to a decent reception from the away support in the second half.This was only his third appearance since the turn of the year.“People want there to be a problem but there isn’t one,” Zidane said. “He did well, offensively and defensively he gave everything. He was a bit short of fitness at the end, so he came off.“We know the player he is and that he will give a lot from now until the end of the season. Let’s count on Gareth.”– Hazard yet to return –Eden Hazard is still yet to return after recovering from a foot fracture. Real play Manchester City in the Champions League in less than two weeks.“It wasn’t the time today again and I hope we’ll see him next week,” said Zidane.Osasuna were the better side in the early stages and took a deserved lead when Unai put his head in front of Casemiro’s dangling foot and steered the ball into the corner.But the visitors improved as the half wore on and Isco volleyed in an equaliser after Bale attempted to divert Ferland Mendy’s cross, with the ball deflecting kindly into the Spaniard’s path.Ramos was lucky to escape a red card after sliding in on Ruben Garcia with a high foot and Madrid’s captain took full advantage of his reprieve as he nodded in Casemiro’s looping header to the back post.Luka Modric had a strong claim for a penalty after he nipped the ball away from Pervis Estupinan in the area before Osasuna enjoyed their most threatening spell.Inigo Perez’s shot whistled just over and Ruben dragged wide from Nacho Vidal’s pull-back after making space with a neat dummy past Ramos. Read Also: Grealish reveals preferred club from Man Utd, Real Madrid, BarcelonaBale went off to applause from the small number of away fans, and Vazquez came on to add a third. Osasuna’s defence were occupied by a Karim Benzema burst and he fed right for Vazquez to drive in. Jovic smashed in a fourth in injury-time.Sevilla lost ground in the race for the top four as they conceded two late goals to lose 2-1 at struggling Celta Vigo.Iago Aspas equalised in the 78th minute for Celta and substitute Pione Sisto scored the winner in the 91st after Youssef En-Nesyri had put Sevilla in front with his first goal for the club.After one win in five league games, Sevilla drop to fifth, behind Atletico Madrid on goal difference. Celta climb out of the relegation zone and up to 17th. Loading… FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Netflix Shows Cancelled Because They Don’t Get The RatingsFascinating Ceilings From Different CountriesFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread ArtHere Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!6 Amazing Shows From The 90s That Need A Reboot Right Now6 Great Ancient Mysteries That Make China Worth Visiting6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooNo Good Disney Role Models For Boys?The 90s Was A Fantastic Decade For Fans Of Action Movieslast_img read more

Schueller tops Friday Hawkeye Dirt Tour feature at Farley

first_imgFARLEY, Iowa (Sept. 13) – Jason Schueller led most of the way and pulled ahead late in winning Friday’s Karl Performance Hawkeye Dirt Tour presented by XSAN feature at Farley Speedway. The $1,500 IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modified series victory came during the Yankee Dirt Track Classic and put Schueller on the ballot for the 2014 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. Mark Elliott qualified from his “B” feature and advanced 15 spots to second while new series point leader Mike Van Genderen was third. Mark Schulte and Jerry Luloff rounded out the top five. Schulte drew the outside front row start and led the first two circuits. The third starting Schueller was alongside and ahead by the width of his bumper when the next lap was scored, then began to pull away before a lap seven caution tightened the field back up. Elliott was up to fourth by lap 10 and got by Schulte for second on lap 15. A series of yellow flags interrupted the race after midway before Van Genderen set his sights on second.Elliott held off that challenge but neither driver was able to make any progress in reeling in Schueller before the end of the 30-lapper. Van Genderen, however, took over the top spot in the standings when Ronn Lauritzen was relegated to 21st place.The championship of the fourth annual series will be decided in the tour finale Saturday evening, Sept. 14 at Farley. That event pays $2,000 to win. Schueller’s victory was his Hawkeye Dirt Tour first. Forty-four Modifieds were entered at Farley for the 10th series event of the season.Feature results – 1. Jason Schueller, Dubuque; 2. Mark Elliott, Webster City; 3. Mike Van Gen­deren, Newton; 4. Mark Schulte, Delhi; 5. Jerry Luloff, Independence; 6. Richie Gustin, Gilman; 7. Kurt Kile, Nichols; 8. Matt Gansen, Zwingle; 9. Ron Barker, Dubuque; 10. Kelly Shryock, Fertile; 11. Dakota Hayden, Wilton; 12. Jason Wolla, Ray, N.D.; 13. Bob Moyer, Dubuque; 14. Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa; 15. Mitch Morris, Eldridge; 16. Zach Less, Hopkinton; 17. Steve Stewart, Burling­ton; 18. Scott Hogan, Vinton; 19. Jerry King, Waterloo; 20. Chris Horn, Cedar Rapids; 21. Ronn Lauritzen, Jesup; 22. Troy Cordes, Dunkerton; 23. Shawn Ryan, Waterloo; 24. Jason Roth, Hazel Green, Wis.1st heat (top four) – 1. Schulte; 2. Moyer; 3. Van Genderen; 4. Roth; 5. Elliott; 6. Kile; 7. Tyler Madigan, Peosta; 8. Matt Werner, Colona, Ill.; 9. John Gartner Jr., Bismarck, N.D.; 10. Tyler Droste, Waterloo; 11. Tony Olson, Cedar Rapids.2nd heat – 1. Morris; 2. Hayden; 3. Barker; 4. Stewart; 5. Less; 6. Kenny Kostenbader, Freeport, Ill.; 7. Dennis Betzer, Central City; 8. Justin Rix, Olin; 9. Jeremy Gengler, Lancaster, Wis.; 10. Keith Pittman, Waterloo; 11. Gustin. 3rd heat – 1. Schueller; 2. Gansen; 3. Luloff; 4. Cordes; 5. Shryock; 6. Mike Burbridge, Delhi; 7. Dugan Thye, Burlington; 8. Pete Bonin, Platteville, Wis.; 9. David McClain, Potosi, Wis.; 10. Steve Van­natta, Platteville, Wis.; 11. Shaun Slaughter, Iowa City.4th heat – 1. Ryan; 2. Carter; 3. Lauritzen; 4. Horn; 5. Hogan; 6. King; 7. Jeff Waterman, Quincy, Ill.; 8. Wolla; 9. Wade Steinmann, Monroe, Wis.; 10. Mike Weidemann, Dubuque; 11. John Camp­bell, Dubuque;1st “B” feature (top three) – 1. Elliott; 2. Shryock; 3. Kile; 4. Werner; 5. Gartner; 6. Thye; 7. Bo­nin; 8. Olson; 9. Madigan; 10. Vannatta; 11. Burbridge; 12. Droste; 13. Thompson; 14. Slaughter; 15. McClain. 2nd “B” feature – 1. Hogan; 2. Gustin; 3. Wolla; 4. King; 5. Gengeler; 6. Betzer; 7. Kostenbader; 8. Campbell; 9. Steinmann; 10. Less; 11. Pittman; 12. Waterman; 13. Weidemann; 14. Rix.Provisionals – Less and King.last_img read more