Tag: 阿拉爱上海aishedes

Barton could risk ban being extended to 14 games – report

first_imgJoey Barton’s 12-match ban has inevitably led to fresh speculation about his future.The Daily Mirror say he is facing the sack by QPR and is considering appealing against the FA’s punishment.The Daily Star also suggest Barton will lodge an appeal which, if unsuccessful, could result in the player’s ban being extended to 14 matches.Wednesday’s QPR quiz: Bad boy BartonDoes Barton deserve to be sacked by QPR? Click here to voteSee also: Hughes to respond to Barton verdictQPR legend urges club to sack BartonFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Chelsea v Atletico Madrid: Bakayoko starts, Alonso rested

first_imgTiémoué Bakayoko starts for Chelsea in the Champions League game at Stamford Bridge.Marcos Alonso has been rested, joining the likes of Willian and Pedro on the bench.The Blues, already sure of a place in the knockout stage, will finish top of Group C if they win tonight.Chelsea: Courtois; Azpilicueta, Christensen, Cahill; Zappacosta, Fabregas, Kante, Bakayoko, Moses; Hazard, Morata.Subs: Caballero, Rudiger, Alonso, Drinkwater, Willian, Pedro, Batshuayi.Atletico Madrid: Oblak, Gimenez, Savic, Lucas, Luis, Koke, Thomas, Gabi, Saul, Torres, Griezmann.Subs: Moya, Godin, Vrsaljko, Carrasco, Correa, Vietto, Gameiro. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Minister Cites Impact of NCDs on Health Budget

first_imgStory Highlights Minister of Science, Energy and Technology, Dr. the Hon. Andrew Wheatley, says non- communicable diseases (NCDs) take up 70 per cent of the country’s health budget, and represent the biggest public health challenge globally in the 21st Century. Dr. Wheatley says it is against this background that the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that member states give this matter “full priority” by developing “policies for the prevention and control” of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors. The Minister was speaking at a Diabetes outreach conference at the Jewel Resort, Runaway Bay, St. Ann, on April 26, sponsored by the Universities of the West Indies, Technology and Northern Caribbean. Minister of Science, Energy and Technology, Dr. the Hon. Andrew Wheatley, says non- communicable diseases (NCDs) take up 70 per cent of the country’s health budget, and represent the biggest public health challenge globally in the 21st Century.Dr. Wheatley says it is against this background that the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that member states give this matter “full priority” by developing “policies for the prevention and control” of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors.The Minister was speaking at a Diabetes outreach conference at the Jewel Resort, Runaway Bay, St. Ann, on April 26, sponsored by the Universities of the West Indies, Technology and Northern Caribbean.Dr. Wheatley noted that in 2005, the WHO, in a report, said that some vital investments will be needed to tackle the problem.“Non-communicable diseases, including diabetes, account for 60 per cent of all deaths worldwide. Four out of every five deaths from chronic diseases come from low and middle income countries,” he said.The Minister pointed out that innovative dietary management is a proven strategy to combat diabetes, adding that physical activity should also be a part of “any daily routine.”“Our diet in this country is mostly of complex carbs. Whether yam, wheat or rice, it is just a Jamaican reality. We have to make the conscious decision to eat in moderation and watch exactly what we are putting in our bodies,” he warned.Dr. Wheatley further added that physical inactivity is a major contributing factor to obesity, “which has been causing all kinds of health issues worldwide.”“A healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of non-communicable diseases,” the Minister advised.Non-communicable diseases tend to be of long duration and are the result of a combination of genetic, physiological, environmental and behavioural factors.The main types of NCDs are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. They mostly affect people in low and middle income countries.last_img read more

National Eating Disorder Awareness Week Orthorexia

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Juice cleanses. Bone broth. Probiotics. Gluten-free. While the newest health trend may start with good intentions, the relatively new eating disorder known as ‘orthorexia’ involves obsessive behaviors or ‘food rules’ about what is healthy and what is not.By cutting back on too many food groups or excessively following any of these trends, people can develop orthorexia, which can mirror symptoms of anorexia, such as bone loss, anemia and slow heart rate.In accordance with National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, Anna Nguyen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist specializing in Eating Disorders at Sharp Mesa Vista Hospital, visited Good Morning San Diego to discuss what orthorexia is, why we are hearing about it more often, how to tell the difference between healthy eating and disordered eating, warning signs and what it can do to your health. KUSI Newsroom March 8, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, National Eating Disorder Awareness Week – Orthorexia Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: March 8, 2019last_img read more

Purported Samsung Galaxy S10 photo shows rumored InfinityO display

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Prehistoric bird with freaky foot gets toehold on scientific literature

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EPFO to accept PF claims of above Rs 10 lakh offline now

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Understanding how slow predators catch faster prey could improve drone tactics

first_img Journal information: New Journal of Physics (Phys.org)—Since a gazelle can run faster than a lion, how do lions ever catch gazelles? A new model of predator-prey interaction shows how groups of predators use collective chasing strategies, such as cornering and circling, to pursue and capture faster prey. Without this tactical collaboration, the predators would have no chance of catching these prey. Simulations of predators (blue dots) chasing a faster prey (red dot). Credit: Janosov et al. Published in New Journal of Physics. © 2017 Phys.org Modelling explains how hunters team up to catch faster prey Explore further In their model, the researchers also observed emergent behavior, which is behavior that appears only in groups. In particular, groups of predators often begin to encircle their prey, and this behavior arises directly from the chasing rules. In nature, it’s common for prey to sometimes run in a zigzag pattern to confuse the predator, and to eventually run directly away from the predator in a straight line. The researchers also observed these strategies in their model, and found that zigzagging is especially advantageous when the predators have a long delay in responding.In the future, the researchers expect that additional interesting results can be obtained by modifying the model, such as investigating situations with multiple fast prey and equipping predators and prey with machine learning algorithms. “Our major goal in this research was to gain a deeper understanding of the collective behavior of animals, to extend our knowledge on fundamental questions on animal behavior,” Janosov said. “However, given the fact that our research group is developing collective motion algorithms for our flock of quadrocopters, there are plenty of potential applications we could propose. For example, a group of tactical drones using smart encircling strategies could become even lifesaving in the case of terrorist attacks, when the goal is to capture terrorist flying vehicles, or chasing criminals in narrow, highly populated urban areas. “Besides these, our results could have potential applications even in the entertainment industry in developing field games, possibly combined with virtual reality tools, or by the streaming of popular sport events, especially those that are widely spread in space—for example, bike or car races.” The results are not only relevant for understanding wildlife, but also have potential applications for drone-flying strategies and in the entertainment industry.The researchers, Milán Janosov, Csaba Virágh, Gábor Vásárhelyi, and Tamás Vicsek at the MTA-ELTE Statistical and Biological Physics Research Group, Hungary, have published their paper on their new model of collective chasing strategies in a recent issue of the New Journal of Physics.”After many previous efforts, we managed to give a simple, yet surprisingly life-like explanation of how predator animals can form successful hunting packs, and by that drastically enhance their chances of being successful on a hunt,” Janosov told Phys.org. “This is particularly interesting because we managed to model these exceptionally complex systems—the hunting groups of large carnivores—in a simulation resembling realistic features of animal pursuits, such as encircling, optimal group size, and finite space, only by using a set of compact rules formulated as force-like interactions in physics.”Although there are other models that describe predator-prey interactions, the new model is different because of the large number of factors it accounts for, such as the prey’s panic threshold, the predator’s ability to predict the prey’s future position, and the interaction between multiple predators, within closed boundaries with realistic measures. All of these parameters contribute to making a more realistic model that accurately describes behaviors observed in nature by groups of predators such as lions, wolves, and coyotes.By running simulations and measuring the effectiveness of different combinations of parameter values, the researchers determined the optimal combinations that resulted in the most successful group chasing strategies. Among their results, they found that just one or two predators can never catch a faster prey, and that groups of three or more succeed only with certain collaborative strategies. More information: Milán Janosov et al. “Group chasing tactics: how to catch a faster prey.” New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/aa69e7 Play Credit: Video abstract, New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/aa69e7 The model revealed that three predators forms an optimal group when chasing in two dimensions (such as on land) in a confined space. In three dimensions (such as in the air or under water), chasing becomes more challenging, and groups of five are optimal. These group sizes are comparable to those observed in nature. Somewhat surprisingly, the researchers also found that an odd number of chasers does better than an even number, which is due to geometrical reasons: with an even number, it’s more likely that a gap remains between predators that allows the prey to escape. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Citation: Understanding how slow predators catch faster prey could improve drone tactics (2017, May 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-predators-faster-prey-drone-tactics.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Mother of all battles

first_imgWhen India play Pakistan at the World Cup, it’s no cliche that both captains say they’re not looking beyond their first game of the tournament. World Cup organisers are tipping Indo-Pak clash to draw the biggest television audience when the teams meet in Adelaide on Sunday in the opening Pool B clash.The politically uneasy neighbours also have a long rivalry on the cricket field, with Pakistan leading overall in their limited-overs meetings. But defending champion India have a 100 per cent record so far after five World Cup clashes. The two teams first locked horns in 1992, also the last time the World Cup was jointly staged by Australia and New Zealand, and the atmosphere was intense and couldn’t be compared with any other game. Also Read – Mahavir Phogat plans sports complex in native villageIn his autobiography Playing It My Way,  which was released last year, Tendulkar has recalled a 2003 World Cup match against Pakistan, saying he’d waited for the showdown for a full year after the schedule was unveiled and couldn’t sleep for several nights before the match. “The nation would brook no failure and for many of our fans this was the true final. It really did not matter to them what happened in the rest of the tournament,” wrote Tendulkar. Also Read – Ballon d’Or: A trophy that evaded legends of the gameIndia won that match by six wickets but lost the final to Australia. India got a measure of revenge by beating Australia in the quarterfinals in 2011, then held of Pakistan in the semifinal in Mohali before beating Sri Lanka in the final at Mumbai, where Tendulkar finally added the World Cup crown to his decorated hat in his sixth attempt.India’s dominance in World Cup matches against Pakistan has confounded critics. The two countries did not meet in the first four editions of the World Cup. In 1992, at the Sydney Cricket Ground, an 18-year-old Tendulkar scored a half-century to propel India to a 43-run win. Though Pakistan lost that match, it went on to win the title. Tendulkar, who scored a record 2,278 runs in 45 World Cup matches, is the only common denominator in those results, averaging 78 and posting three half-centuries, including a high of 98 in that 2003 match. But he retired in 2013, leaving India skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni and the likes of Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma to continue the legacy. Both teams have been conscious to emphasise the rivalry between players is on the field, and there’s no animosity outside the boundary. Yet both teams were publicly silent, holding closed practice sessions as fans from  both sides started flooding into Adelaide. Hotels and flights on the weekend were fully booked, and anticipation was growing. Commenting on Sunday’s match, Mohinder Amarnath, hero of the 1983 World Cup-winning side, said, “There is not much of a difference between the two teams. Both have good individual players but I will go with the record. India has always done and played well against Pakistan in World Cup. But if India wins this time, it will be because of their batting and not bowling.”Interestingly, this will be India’s first World Cup fixture against Pakistan which will not feature Sachin Tendulkar. “Tendulkar has been a great player but every player has to retire and you can’t get a replacement of his calibre anywhere. Not only him but players like Rahul Dravid, Virender Sehwag, VVS Laxman, Yuvraj Singh are irreplaceable,” added Amarnath, who was man-of-the-series during India’s World Cup triumph in 1983.Four years back in Mohali, Tendulkar (85) again rose to the occasion in a crunch semifinal tie and helped India to a fighting total of 260/9. The home team was well placed to post a superior total but was restricted by left-arm pacer Wahab Riaz (5/46). Pakistan’s response was typical, a strong start followed by a middle-order failure. The onus fell on the reliable Misbah-ul-Haq (56) to pull Pakistan through but he ran out of partners and ultimately was the last person to be dismissed.No Tendulkar gives Pakistan World Cup hopeIndia go into the World Cup without the reassuring presence of retired batting superstar Sachin Tendulkar for the first time since 1992, which surely must bring relief to arch-rivals Pakistan. Pakistan have lost all their five World Cup meetings against India and Tendulkar, who featured in all of them, proved a stumbling block on at least four occasions. India and Pakistan face each other in a high-voltage clash at the Adelaide Oval on Sunday to kickstart their campaigns in the 2015 edition of cricket’s showpiece event. Tendulkar, who retired in 2013 as the world’s leading run-getter in both Test and one-day cricket, added colour to the World Cup, both literally and metaphorically. Coloured clothing was introduced to the World Cup when Tendulkar made his tournament debut in Australia and New Zealand in 1992 after the first four editions were played in whites. Over the next six editions, the prolific Mumbaikar scored more runs (2,278) and centuries (six) than any other batsman in the tournament, ending his World Cup career with a creditable average of 56.95. Indian fans hold a placard for Sachin Tendulkar, who has scored more World Cup runs and centuries than any other player. Tendulkar often spoke of his dream of winning the World Cup for India, saying he was inspired as a 10-year-old by the country’s triumph in the 1983 editon when Kapil Dev’s men stunned favourites West Indies at Lord’s. He saw action from close quarters as a ball boy at Mumbai’s Wankhede stadium when India co-hosted the World Cup with Pakistan in 1987, two years before he burst on the world scene as a 16-year-old. Tendulkar was the tournament’s leading scorer when India made the semifinal in 1996 and the final in 2003 before he realised his dream when Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s side won back the title on a memorable night in Mumbai on April 2, 2011.Former greats favour IndiaLegendary cricketers Sunil Gavaskar and Ian Chappell tipped India as favourites in their much anticipated World Cup clash against Pakistan, saying past history and better acclimatisation to Australian conditions could tilt the balance in favour of the defending champions. Both Gavaskar and Chappell said Pakistan are unlikely to break their World Cup jinx this time also, although both sides go into the showpiece event as struggling teams. “Both teams are going into the World Cup not in great touch. Pakistan are also struggling as they had lost to New Zealand recently, it could be even stevens. But I think India will start as slight favourites because of their past records,” Gavaskar said.He said the absence of off-spinner Saeed Ajmal will have a huge impact on the 1992 champions. “Without a doubt, Ajmal was half the Pakistan side and they will be hit hard without him. He is a wicket-taking and a containing bowler. He is just like Muttiah Muralitharan in his prime days in the Sri Lankan side,” the former Indian captain said. “They (Pakistan) won the World Cup in 1992 but at that time they had so many match-winners in Imran Khan, Javed Miandad, Wasim Akram, Inzamam-ul-Haq. They don’t have those match-winners in the current team. The loss of Junaid Khan is also a big blow for them. India have been playing in Australia for the past two months and they have acclimatised more to the conditions than  the Pakistanis,” Chappell said.last_img read more

Echoing Silence

first_imgIt is often said that photography is about capturing souls and not smiles. “We are one!” believes Italian artiste, Attilio Tripodi who makes one introspect and visualize landscapes and human emotions in a new way as one takes a walk through his photography exhibition titled, ‘Temporary Solitudes’ at Indian International Centre (IIC) fromJuly 6-16, 11 am to 7pm in the national Capital.“We share our lives with those around us, through our thoughts, actions and emotions as human nature drives us to be sociable. We are connected to each other. We have more or less consolidated our material reality, but we are not often aware of our inner spiritual nature or worse, we deny it,” says Tripodi pointing towards one of his captures. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ One would witness lines, colours and graphic elements synced in such a way that enhances the ability of an image to communicate. There are around 50 photographs captured in different countries. Also, you will mark only one person in every picture with prevailing landscapes and various angles to rouse emotions.Elaborating on the exhibition…‘Temporary Solitudes’ is my humble gaze of a fragment of humanity. I feel that I am a part of it. I am conscious of the invisible thread that connects the whole of humanity, and that whenever a person gets in the way of its evolution, the benefit is collective.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixI do not wish to disseminate any message but only interpret things and sounds that surround me with a tool called photography. While selecting images for the exhibition, I preferred the ones that matched my aesthetic sense – lines, shapes, and textures can be seen in all my photos.Inspired by human landscapesI always prefer ‘human landscapes’ in my photographs, an innate vision. I like to photograph people immersed in their daily lives, as I too am a part of it and especially because in my journey of inner and spiritual growth, I have learned that we are all connected to each other. I imagined that the protagonists of my photos deliberately seek the solitude required to create a contact with one’s own soul, a necessary prelude to begin a process of growth of evolution. On capturing emotions…Capturing expressions, joy, smiles, awkwardness, signs of aging that draw and redraw faces of different people excite me. I love watching people and capturing them. It paves a way to see myself, through this endless game of mirrors that is life.The journeyIt took me a year and a half to focus on this concept. The images came in a spontaneous and natural way. There were no such challenges, everything just fell in place. I also found some photos taken a few years ago that very well amalgamated with the other photos of the collection as they in sync with its aesthetic expression.Black and white huesMy photos usually express liveliness through colours. For ‘Temporary Solitudes’, I preferred using monochrome as it connects to the theme which is meditative and intimate. The images express a feeling of vitality which unites them, that perhaps have a tinge of melancholy but never sad. I preferred minimal shots without any disturbing elements to accentuate the introspective aspect.Art is never static It is not very different from my previous works. As the Talmud (central text of Rabbinic Judaism) states, “We do not see things as they are, but we see things as we are,” I believe it affirms the uniqueness of each person, despite the similarities. Currently, I’m working on a completely different collection, dedicated to symbols and contradictions of human nature, without moralizing or judging, with a touch of vibrant creativity. Photography is an art and art is a dynamic concept, always moving, never static.last_img read more