Tag: 爱上海MT

Vulfpeck Cancels Scheduled Jam Cruise Appearance, Will Be Replaced By Twiddle

first_imgSome interesting news from Jam Cruise today, as the seafaring festival has announced that Vulfpeck has cancelled their scheduled performance and will no longer be a part of their upcoming event. While no reason has been given, the festival has revealed that Twiddle will be added to the lineup in their stead. Twiddle performed on the previous Jam Cruise, as you can see in the pro-shot video below.The festival’s announcement simply cites “forces beyond our control” for the Vulfpeck cancellation. We’re sorry to see them leave the lineup, but the festival is still filled with favorites like The Original Meters, moe., GRiZ, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Benevento Russo Duo, Lettuce, Kamasi Washington, The Motet, The Revivalists and more!You can see the Jam Cruise announcement below.last_img read more

Linda Lou McDole

first_imgLinda Lou McDole, age 55, of Vevay, Indiana, entered this life on August 8, 1962, in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, the daughter of the late, Gilbert Douglas and Emma Lee (Hankins) McDole. She was raised in Bennington, Indiana and was a 1980 graduate of the Switzerland County High School. She attended Ivy Tech Community College in Madison, Indiana and received her Administrators License in Indianapolis, Indiana. Linda was employed as a registered nurse in the intensive care unit for Carroll County Memorial Hospital and Green Valley Nursing Home in Carrollton, Kentucky. She was also employed for Silver Bell Nursing Home in Versailles, Indiana and Jackson’s Senior Citizen Home in Vevay, Indiana. Linda was a member of the Vevay Tri Kappa and Christian Missionary Alliance in Aurora, Indiana. Linda resided in Aurora, Indiana and in the Vevay community since 1978. Linda enjoyed reading, crocheting and horseback riding. Linda passed away at 3:55 a.m., Thursday, April 5, 2018, at the Swiss Villa Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Vevay, Indiana.Linda will be deeply missed by her brothers, Robert McDole of Vevay, IN and Paul McDole of Vevay, IN; her sister, Debbie Bamberger of Aurora, IN and her nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death by her parents, Gilbert Douglas and Emma Lee (Hankins) McDole; her brother, David Luther McDole died April 4, 2011 and her sister-in-law, Linda Joyce (Hash) McDole, died June 22, 2012.Funeral services will be conducted Monday, April 9, 2018, at 1:00 pm, by Rev. Mike Jones at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Friends may call 11:00 am – 1:00 pm, Monday, April 9, 2018, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043. Memorial contributions may be made to the Vevay Tri Kappa. Cards are available at the funeral home.last_img read more

Verbal commit Ellison looks to add versatility, depth to Syracuse secondary

first_img Published on October 28, 2014 at 12:06 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @SamBlum3 Scout.com, ESPN, Rivals and Hudl all list Daivon Ellison as a cornerback.But the Don Bosco Preparatory (New Jersey) High School senior doesn’t define himself as the recruiting websites do.The reason Syracuse recruited him, he says, is because he can basically play any position.“I’m not just a corner,” he said.And it’s Ellison’s ability to play safety and corner that can only help a Syracuse secondary that has struggled with its depth in the last couple of seasons. He is the most recent commit to SU’s Class of 2015 after verbally committing on Aug. 25 and will have a lot of competition to see the field right away.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAlso part of the class are cornerbacks Gerald Robinson and Andrew Spence, along with three more safeties — and Ellison’s versatility could give him an edge as the Orange secondary continues to evolve.“He really is flying around everywhere on the field, all different types of positions,” DBP defensive tackle Kevin Feder said. “He’s a huge game-changer having him in the game. It helps out every which way.”Injuries — along with freshman safety Naesean Howard leaving the team earlier this season — have struck the Syracuse secondary multiple times in the past two years. This season, third cornerback Wayne Morgan has battled a lower-body injury and it was announced by SU Athletics on Monday that freshman safety Rodney Williams will miss the rest of the season with a lower-body injury.Last year, safety Durell Eskridge and cornerback Julian Whigham both had season-ending injuries. And with Eskridge eligible for the NFL draft at the end of the season and Brandon Reddish graduating, there will be opportunities for the current crop of freshmen and the incoming defensive backs to contribute.“But the key thing is that can they line up and play our base package?” said SU defensive backs coach Fred Reed during training camp of how he develops young players. “If they can line up and play our base package, then we got a chance to get them out there and be able to perform.“We try and teach them our base system and not put too much on their plates. That’s how we approach it.”Ellison started out as an outside linebacker his freshman year, before eventually transitioning to cornerback his sophomore year. As a junior, he split time at both, but has focused the majority of his time at cornerback his senior year at Don Bosco.He also moonlights as a wide receiver and running back, playing 5–10 plays per game on offense and also contributing as the team’s top kick returner on special teams.Ellison is always the guy talking with coaches so that he could have both the offensive and defensive playbook memorized.“During the offseason he just trains to get his stamina up, because he’s going to be on the field most of the time,” said Wes McKoy, Don Bosco’s quarterback.Ellison said there are pros and cons to playing both cornerback and safety. As a corner, he said he loves being on that island and shutting down a wideout one-on-one. But he also resents the fact that he can’t be a game-changer at cornerback if the opposing team runs plays away from him.At safety, he feels like the leader of the defense. He likes being in the middle of the field, coming up on the runs and shutting down the deep passes.At Syracuse, he could zero in on one or play either position — a luxury the Orange can only benefit from.Said Ellison: “As of right now, I’m roaming around the defensive backs.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

After the ‘Thrill’ is gone from the pages

first_imgWhen I first took this column two and a half years ago, I envisioned saying goodbye in a three-part series.The first would be a detailed look at the birth of the column. Part two would be a retelling of its life.Part three would be an in-depth look at its title, “Thrilla on Manilla Paper.” After all, you deserve to know what in the world could possibly have led to such a name. And before this is all over, you might still get that explanation.But instead of a three column series, it is just this one.I thought, two and a half years ago, by the time it was all said and done, I’d need thousands of words to sum everything up. Instead, it’s just a few hundred on this piece of paper.In fact, one sentence might do the trick. So here it goes.What a long, strange trip it’s been.It’s a journey that has truly traversed this campus and country.It has gone from the steps of Heritage Hall to the gates of Dedeaux Field, from press row at Galen Center to the tallest heights of the Coliseum.It’s a trip that’s taken me from Los Angeles to the top of a hill in Berkeley; from the cozy confines of South Bend, Ind., to the open air of Seattle, Wash.It’s taken me from a stadium that seats 100,000 people in Columbus, Ohio, to a stadium that sounds like it seats 100,000 people in Eugene, Ore.Simply being there has been remarkable and being able to share it with you through my lens has been just as great.But simply being there is not the story. No, this column would be far more boring if it were just a retelling of the places I’ve been.Postcards are for brief hellos and goodbyes. Columns are not. Columns are a place for opinion and analysis — a look at what has occurred along that journey.But again, this would just be a space filled with words if there were no characters. So I owe it to all the men and women who have graced these pages along the way, who have made the stories what they were — and given me the ability to write what I’ve written.There was Pete Carroll, who over the last four years was one of the most quotable people on the planet.He reveled in every win, and was quick to point out who deserved praise, wallowed in each loss and never hesitated to point the finger at himself.Without Carroll, this would just been stories about a football team. Instead, wins and losses took on a life of their own, with Carroll’s commentary as an integral part of their interpretations one way or another.There was Joe McKnight, whose tenure at USC was a tumultuous one, filled with great promise and flashes of brilliance as well as great disappointment.Without McKnight, this would have been a football team with a lot of running backs. Instead, it was a football team with a bevy of backs, one of which could have been legendary.There was Tim Floyd, Taj Gibson, Dwight Lewis, Daniel Hackett, O.J. Mayo and DeMar Derozan. All six were central figures in the meteoric rise of USC basketball and key players in its sudden fall.There is Jovan Vavic, the candid and quotable head coach of USC’s top-ranked water polo teams. He reached the pinnacle of the sport but found obstacles in his attempt to repeat — that was, until he got over the hump.But again, it would just be a story if not for Vavic’s passion and intensity. He spoke his mind and wore his emotions on his sleeve, making for more than just some article about a few games in a pool.There have been dozens of other names that have crossed these pages, each with a story to tell and each with the unique ability to make a story more than just words.Really, all I’ve done over the last two and a half years is mix their words and actions with my opinions. What you have as the end result is a column.Whether you’ve agreed with me or not is not important. It’s whether you’ve taken the time to agree with me or not that’s more important.If you have, thank you. I hope you’ve been able to take something away from this.The inches left in this paper are running low, so before I say goodbye for good, let me explain one last thing: my column’s name.I wanted to name it “From the Parking Lot,” in reference to a shot by former Vermont basketball player T.J. Sorrentine. He hit a deep three late in a first round game against Syracuse in 2005, securing an upset for the No. 13 Catamounts. The shot was from way behind the arc, prompting Gus Johnson to say: “Sorrentine hit that one from the parking lot.”But the Daily Trojan’s sports editor at the time, Peter Simones, said the reference was too obscure. Instead, after brainstorming, a title playing off one of the greatest boxing matches of all time was chosen.Clever, I know.Anyway, now that the name situation has been settled, that time is drawing near. It’s the time where this column comes to an end.But before it’s knocked out for good, I want to leave you with a quote from General MacArthur. He said, “Old columnists never die, they just fade away.”Actually, I don’t think that’s what he said. But it’s too late now. There’s no space left to talk about it, no columns left to write.“Thrilla on Manilla Paper” ran every other Friday. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Grant at [email protected]last_img read more