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Harvard Institute of Politics announces fall fellows

first_imgFormer Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel joins the 2016 class as a visiting fellowCambridge, Mass. – Harvard’s Institute of Politics (IOP), at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, today announced the selection of the 2016 IOP fall resident and visiting fellows.“We have an extraordinary class of Fellows. They are the perfect guides to lead our students through the fascinating terrain of this election year,” said Harvard Institute of Politics Director Maggie Williams. The fellows program is central to the Institute’s dual commitment to encourage student interest in public life and to increase interaction between the academic and political communities. Over the course of an academic semester, resident fellows interact with students, develop and lead weekly study groups and participate in the intellectual life of the Harvard community. Visiting fellows join the Institute for a shorter period and maximize their time meeting with students, faculty and Harvard research center staff.The full list of fellows and their biographies can be found at the link below. Read Full Storylast_img read more

The Irish space famine

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

After the ‘Thrill’ is gone from the pages

first_imgWhen I first took this column two and a half years ago, I envisioned saying goodbye in a three-part series.The first would be a detailed look at the birth of the column. Part two would be a retelling of its life.Part three would be an in-depth look at its title, “Thrilla on Manilla Paper.” After all, you deserve to know what in the world could possibly have led to such a name. And before this is all over, you might still get that explanation.But instead of a three column series, it is just this one.I thought, two and a half years ago, by the time it was all said and done, I’d need thousands of words to sum everything up. Instead, it’s just a few hundred on this piece of paper.In fact, one sentence might do the trick. So here it goes.What a long, strange trip it’s been.It’s a journey that has truly traversed this campus and country.It has gone from the steps of Heritage Hall to the gates of Dedeaux Field, from press row at Galen Center to the tallest heights of the Coliseum.It’s a trip that’s taken me from Los Angeles to the top of a hill in Berkeley; from the cozy confines of South Bend, Ind., to the open air of Seattle, Wash.It’s taken me from a stadium that seats 100,000 people in Columbus, Ohio, to a stadium that sounds like it seats 100,000 people in Eugene, Ore.Simply being there has been remarkable and being able to share it with you through my lens has been just as great.But simply being there is not the story. No, this column would be far more boring if it were just a retelling of the places I’ve been.Postcards are for brief hellos and goodbyes. Columns are not. Columns are a place for opinion and analysis — a look at what has occurred along that journey.But again, this would just be a space filled with words if there were no characters. So I owe it to all the men and women who have graced these pages along the way, who have made the stories what they were — and given me the ability to write what I’ve written.There was Pete Carroll, who over the last four years was one of the most quotable people on the planet.He reveled in every win, and was quick to point out who deserved praise, wallowed in each loss and never hesitated to point the finger at himself.Without Carroll, this would just been stories about a football team. Instead, wins and losses took on a life of their own, with Carroll’s commentary as an integral part of their interpretations one way or another.There was Joe McKnight, whose tenure at USC was a tumultuous one, filled with great promise and flashes of brilliance as well as great disappointment.Without McKnight, this would have been a football team with a lot of running backs. Instead, it was a football team with a bevy of backs, one of which could have been legendary.There was Tim Floyd, Taj Gibson, Dwight Lewis, Daniel Hackett, O.J. Mayo and DeMar Derozan. All six were central figures in the meteoric rise of USC basketball and key players in its sudden fall.There is Jovan Vavic, the candid and quotable head coach of USC’s top-ranked water polo teams. He reached the pinnacle of the sport but found obstacles in his attempt to repeat — that was, until he got over the hump.But again, it would just be a story if not for Vavic’s passion and intensity. He spoke his mind and wore his emotions on his sleeve, making for more than just some article about a few games in a pool.There have been dozens of other names that have crossed these pages, each with a story to tell and each with the unique ability to make a story more than just words.Really, all I’ve done over the last two and a half years is mix their words and actions with my opinions. What you have as the end result is a column.Whether you’ve agreed with me or not is not important. It’s whether you’ve taken the time to agree with me or not that’s more important.If you have, thank you. I hope you’ve been able to take something away from this.The inches left in this paper are running low, so before I say goodbye for good, let me explain one last thing: my column’s name.I wanted to name it “From the Parking Lot,” in reference to a shot by former Vermont basketball player T.J. Sorrentine. He hit a deep three late in a first round game against Syracuse in 2005, securing an upset for the No. 13 Catamounts. The shot was from way behind the arc, prompting Gus Johnson to say: “Sorrentine hit that one from the parking lot.”But the Daily Trojan’s sports editor at the time, Peter Simones, said the reference was too obscure. Instead, after brainstorming, a title playing off one of the greatest boxing matches of all time was chosen.Clever, I know.Anyway, now that the name situation has been settled, that time is drawing near. It’s the time where this column comes to an end.But before it’s knocked out for good, I want to leave you with a quote from General MacArthur. He said, “Old columnists never die, they just fade away.”Actually, I don’t think that’s what he said. But it’s too late now. There’s no space left to talk about it, no columns left to write.“Thrilla on Manilla Paper” ran every other Friday. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Grant at [email protected]last_img read more

Warriors’ desire to re-sign Klay Thompson ‘doesn’t change’ because of ACL injury

first_img NBA Finals 2019: 3 reasons why the Warriors lost to the Raptors “I don’t know yet what we’re going to do,” Lacob told Yahoo Sports. “I’ve said for a long time I want Klay to be a Warrior for life, and so this doesn’t change anything as far as I’m concerned.”Although Thompson’s first choice is to re-sign with the Warriors, who drafted him in 2011, he would consider other teams if obstacles come up, Yahoo’s sources said. Related News “I’m not going to say anything because the free-agency period isn’t here yet,” Lacob said. “You know I have the utmost regard for Klay’s talent and for him as a person. I’m pretty sure we’ll talk this summer, and he’ll hopefully be a Warrior for life.”The free-agent negotiating period begins June 30.Thompson’s future could be intertwined with that of Kevin Durant, also a pending free agent who suffered a devastating injury in the NBA Finals. He ruptured his right Achilles in Game 5 and is expected to miss the entire 2019-20 season. Later Friday, though, Thompson’s father Mychal told the San Francisco Chronicle there’s “no question” his son will stay with Golden State. Just spoke with Klay Thompson’s father, Mychal, who said there’s “no question” Klay will re-sign with the Warriors. Golden State is expected to still offer him a full five-year maximum deal.— Connor Letourneau (@Con_Chron) June 14, 2019Game 6 offered just a glimpse of what he can bring on the court: Before Thompson went down awkwardly after going up for a dunk, he was the best player on the floor, scoring a game-high 30 points on 8-of-12 shooting from the field, 4-of-6 from 3-point range, and 10-of-10 from the free-throw line while grabbing five rebounds in 32 minutes.In eight seasons with Golden State, Thompson has averaged 19.5 points per game.Just as important, however, he emerged as a vocal leader during the 2019 NBA Finals, which the two-time defending champion Warriors lost to the Raptors.center_img Re-signing five-time All-Star guard Klay Thompson remains a priority for the Warriors, team owner Joe Lacob told Yahoo Sports in the wake of the torn left ACL the star suffered Thursday in Game 6 of the NBA Finals.Thompson, who according to the report is expected to miss up to 10 months because of the injury, was seeking a max contract this summer in free agency. The injury might complicate things this offseason, but Lacob says he remains intent on bringing back Thompson, 29. Stephen Curry hails injured Klay Thompson as Warriors confirm torn ACLlast_img read more

Murakami wins mile in Dream run

first_img Not a bad outing for her first time on a well-worn, 160-yard wooden, banked track on loan from the defunct L.A. Invitational. Murakami had never before seen an indoor meet in person. “I just wanted to come out and have fun to take a break from running long distance every day,” she said. FRESNO – Shannon Murakami on Monday finally got her chance to run on an indoor track. The Saugus High junior can’t wait for another chance to compete indoors after winning the mile in 5 minutes, 8.10 seconds in the inaugural Run for the Dream track and field meet at Fresno State. The performance came two hours after she ran a 2:19 leg on the Centurions’ 4 x 880-yard relay team, joining sophomore Katie Dunn and freshmen Keri Mott and Grace Vaziri. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGift Box shows no rust in San Antonio Stakes win at Santa Anita Although Murakami, in her last trip to Fresno, won the state Division I cross country title last November at nearby Woodward Park, her cross country season didn’t end on a particularly high note. She finished a disappointing 12th place in the Foot Locker West Regional Championships a week after the state meet. All doubts about her fitness were answered when she ran 10:37.6 for two miles in the Long Beach Distance Carnival at Long Beach State in December. There will be high expectations this high school season for Murakami, who ran 4:50.59 in the 1,600 meters and 10:34.75 in the 3,200 meters last season, the state’s second-best marks by a sophomore. “I didn’t really worry about time today,” Murakami said. “It was more for the experience, but it showed that I am in pretty good shape.” In the college-open competition, Cal State Northridge’s Rolando Felizola won the long jump at 22 feet, 7 inches, and USC’s Alexis Weatherspoon (Grant High of Van Nuys) was fourth in the invitational 55 meters in 7.06. center_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more