Tag: 夜上海论坛LK

Life stories keep him turning (and sniffing) the page

first_imgThis article is part of a series on the impact of humanities studies in and out of the classroom.There has rarely been a decisive moment in Luke Kelly’s life that hasn’t involved a book.Kelly ’19 was homeschooled for most of his childhood in Pascagula, Miss., which included constant reading, from “Aesop’s Fables” to the short stories of Eudora Welty. He also studied piano, helped by a teacher whose worldliness and charisma still speak to Kelly from the (stolen) page.“That piece of sheet music I ‘permanently borrowed’ was the first book I consciously collected,” he said. “I collected it not to practice with, but to remember all that I learned from someone I so greatly wanted to imitate. If you open it up, you can still smell that house.”His study of “Schofield’s Definition of Discipline” during his brief time at West Point helped Kelly realize that military training wasn’t the type of education he wanted. When he landed at Harvard already in possession of what would later be honored as an exceptional book collection, he knew he had found the right place.“Harry Widener is my patron saint,” said Kelly, a history concentrator. “He lived this young life, died too early, and all people know him for is the library. But looking at his books and what he valued, I feel like I know him better than most people do because I see his passions. You miss the whole point if you just see he had a Gutenberg Bible. I know what kind of pipe tobacco he owned.”Such attention to detail reflects Kelly’s drive for connecting with the life behind a book, a passion his job at Houghton Library has rewarded and deepened.“I’d work there for free,” he said. “I’m interested in people’s biographies, memoirs, and sometimes people didn’t leave those behind … sometimes you get that sense of what they valued and excited them through the objects they left behind.“I’ve pored over Widener’s copy of ‘The Pickwick Papers,’ and it reeks of Latakia pipe tobacco. No one would know that unless you were holding it and sniffing it. Every day I’m there I find out something new.”Library assistant Joseph Zajac, Kelly’s supervisor at Houghton, recognizes a “genuine book lover and expert” in the Dunster House resident.“He’s a perfect learner, has a huge knowledge about books, and has excellent memory,” Zajac said. “I had a very similar enthusiasm when I was his age.”While in high school, Kelly began collecting books by the Alabama author and poet Eugene Walter, starting with “The Untidy Pilgrim” (1954).“It was the first first-edition book of his I bought, and I couldn’t believe I hadn’t heard of him,” Kelly said. “I then went on a mission to find everything he’d ever written.”The Walter collection earned Kelly the Harvard Library 2016 Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting. Next came a win in the National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest, which helped Kelly gain entry into the exclusive Grolier Club, a New York-based collecting society, as its youngest member.“I didn’t expect to get into it until I’m 65 years old,” said Kelly. “I’ve accomplished half my life goals.”Kelly also proudly belongs to the John Adams Society, a conservative-leaning club for debate of politics and moral philosophy.“There are monarchists, Hamiltonians — it’s not an echo chamber,” he said. “We have intellectual discussion that is informal and formal at the same time. We argue about the rules as much as the debate resolutions.”In both the John Adams Society and at Houghton, Kelly has found ways to connect the past with the present. That’s no less the case in one of his favorite fall courses, “History of the Book and of Reading,” where he’s found a like-minded professor in Ann Blair.“It’s usually a very moving experience for students to handle a book that is hundreds of years old, as we can in our wonderful Houghton Library,” said Blair. “Luke has the love of books written all over him, and he’s a very committed member of that community. I’m delighted that he will surely carry forward the love and knowledge of books.”last_img read more

Pompeii’s museum comes back to life to display amazing finds

first_imgPOMPEII, Italy (AP) — Decades after suffering bombing and earthquake damage, Pompeii’s museum is back in business, showing off exquisite finds from excavations of the ancient Roman city. Officials at the archeological park of the ruins of the city destroyed in 79 A.D. by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius inaugurated the museum on Monday. Known as the Antiquarium, the museum gives Pompeii a permanent exhibition space. Visitors can see some of the frescoes and chunks of wall graffiti unearthed by archaeologists as well as objects of the everyday life that was snuffed out by the volcanic explosion. Due to pandemic travel restrictions, only visitors from Italy’s Campania region can currently visit but officials eagerly await the return of all visitors.last_img read more

Mustapha Pledges Integrity, Justice as Watchwords in CAF

first_imgThe new President of the CAF Board of Appeal, A. U. Mustapha (SAN) has assured football stakeholders in the continent that his board will employ integrity and justice to all as watchwords during its tenure.Speaking in Abuja shortly after he was appointed to the position, the former Chairman of the NFF Electoral Committee said: “I want to first and foremost, thank the NFF President, Mr. Amaju Melvin Pinnick, for making this possible. I never lobbied for the job and I never even knew that I was being considered. Perhaps, the big roles that AITEO continue to play in Nigerian football and at CAF level brought one to prominence. I thank Mr. Benedict Peters (President, AITEO) for his immense service to football.“For me, the approach to this new assignment will be simple: integrity will be at the front –burner. A lot of people who know me can vouch for me on this. More importantly, we will follow the rules dispassionately to deliver justice to all.” A distinguished legal practitioner of over two decades, A. U. Mustapha has excelled in various assignments in Nigerian Football as well as in using strategic thinking to run diverse businesses.A dynamic, articulate and pragmatic team player, he has attended reputable international institutions including the Harvard Business School (USA), Manchester Business School, Suffolk Law School (both in the United Kingdom) and the Business School Netherlands in The Hague. He has served in top positions in various businesses and in boards of corporate entities, as well as with the National Sports Commission (Chairman, National Appeals Committee), the NFF (Chairman, NFF Electoral Committee & Deputy Chairman, NFF Committee for Ethics and Fairplay) and the League (Member, Organising and Disciplinary Committee).“My father was the Chairman of Kwara State Football Association and we used to follow him to the stadium to watch matches, so you can say the love of the game is from the cradle!“I see every assignment as a call to service. I have enjoyed the experience all the way, but I will say the most challenging for me was conducting the 2010 NFF Elections, which has been adjudged as perhaps the most credible in NFF history. There were lots of intrigues and attempts were made to compromise us, with threats and invasion of privacy thrown into the bargain.“However, our unwavering commitment to a credible process prevailed to the extent that the FIFA observer offered me a job with FIFA, but a highly –placed Nigerian told him that my hands are full in Nigeria!”A. U. Mustapha was last Friday, at the 40th CAF General Assembly in Casablanca, named the new President of the CAF Board of Appeal.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

After the ‘Thrill’ is gone from the pages

first_imgWhen I first took this column two and a half years ago, I envisioned saying goodbye in a three-part series.The first would be a detailed look at the birth of the column. Part two would be a retelling of its life.Part three would be an in-depth look at its title, “Thrilla on Manilla Paper.” After all, you deserve to know what in the world could possibly have led to such a name. And before this is all over, you might still get that explanation.But instead of a three column series, it is just this one.I thought, two and a half years ago, by the time it was all said and done, I’d need thousands of words to sum everything up. Instead, it’s just a few hundred on this piece of paper.In fact, one sentence might do the trick. So here it goes.What a long, strange trip it’s been.It’s a journey that has truly traversed this campus and country.It has gone from the steps of Heritage Hall to the gates of Dedeaux Field, from press row at Galen Center to the tallest heights of the Coliseum.It’s a trip that’s taken me from Los Angeles to the top of a hill in Berkeley; from the cozy confines of South Bend, Ind., to the open air of Seattle, Wash.It’s taken me from a stadium that seats 100,000 people in Columbus, Ohio, to a stadium that sounds like it seats 100,000 people in Eugene, Ore.Simply being there has been remarkable and being able to share it with you through my lens has been just as great.But simply being there is not the story. No, this column would be far more boring if it were just a retelling of the places I’ve been.Postcards are for brief hellos and goodbyes. Columns are not. Columns are a place for opinion and analysis — a look at what has occurred along that journey.But again, this would just be a space filled with words if there were no characters. So I owe it to all the men and women who have graced these pages along the way, who have made the stories what they were — and given me the ability to write what I’ve written.There was Pete Carroll, who over the last four years was one of the most quotable people on the planet.He reveled in every win, and was quick to point out who deserved praise, wallowed in each loss and never hesitated to point the finger at himself.Without Carroll, this would just been stories about a football team. Instead, wins and losses took on a life of their own, with Carroll’s commentary as an integral part of their interpretations one way or another.There was Joe McKnight, whose tenure at USC was a tumultuous one, filled with great promise and flashes of brilliance as well as great disappointment.Without McKnight, this would have been a football team with a lot of running backs. Instead, it was a football team with a bevy of backs, one of which could have been legendary.There was Tim Floyd, Taj Gibson, Dwight Lewis, Daniel Hackett, O.J. Mayo and DeMar Derozan. All six were central figures in the meteoric rise of USC basketball and key players in its sudden fall.There is Jovan Vavic, the candid and quotable head coach of USC’s top-ranked water polo teams. He reached the pinnacle of the sport but found obstacles in his attempt to repeat — that was, until he got over the hump.But again, it would just be a story if not for Vavic’s passion and intensity. He spoke his mind and wore his emotions on his sleeve, making for more than just some article about a few games in a pool.There have been dozens of other names that have crossed these pages, each with a story to tell and each with the unique ability to make a story more than just words.Really, all I’ve done over the last two and a half years is mix their words and actions with my opinions. What you have as the end result is a column.Whether you’ve agreed with me or not is not important. It’s whether you’ve taken the time to agree with me or not that’s more important.If you have, thank you. I hope you’ve been able to take something away from this.The inches left in this paper are running low, so before I say goodbye for good, let me explain one last thing: my column’s name.I wanted to name it “From the Parking Lot,” in reference to a shot by former Vermont basketball player T.J. Sorrentine. He hit a deep three late in a first round game against Syracuse in 2005, securing an upset for the No. 13 Catamounts. The shot was from way behind the arc, prompting Gus Johnson to say: “Sorrentine hit that one from the parking lot.”But the Daily Trojan’s sports editor at the time, Peter Simones, said the reference was too obscure. Instead, after brainstorming, a title playing off one of the greatest boxing matches of all time was chosen.Clever, I know.Anyway, now that the name situation has been settled, that time is drawing near. It’s the time where this column comes to an end.But before it’s knocked out for good, I want to leave you with a quote from General MacArthur. He said, “Old columnists never die, they just fade away.”Actually, I don’t think that’s what he said. But it’s too late now. There’s no space left to talk about it, no columns left to write.“Thrilla on Manilla Paper” ran every other Friday. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Grant at [email protected]last_img read more

IPL 2016: Winless Kings XI Punjab up against Rising Pune Supergiants at home

first_imgKings XI Punjab need to put up a strong show to bounce back from two successive defeats when they take on Rising Pune Supergiants in an Indian Premier League (IPL) cricket contest here on Sunday.KXIP, who started their campaign at the Punjab Cricket Association’s I.S. Bindra Stadium here against Gujarat Lions on Monday, crumbled to their second loss in as many games in an eight-wicket thrashing against Delhi Daredevils on Friday. (IPL Full Coverage) So far, they have failed to impress in every department. Against Delhi, they could only score 111 for nine, while in the match against Gujarat, they got off to a fine start thanks to Murali Vijay and Manan Vohra before the middle-order dropped its guard.The main reason for their batting failure is due to the disappointing show from the mainstays — David Miller and Glenn Maxwell. While South African Miller has scored 24 runs so far, Australian hard-hitter Maxwell has made two runs.Their best batsman has been Vohra, who has 70 runs in two matches — but the Punjabi right-hander doesn’t have a game that can change the course of a match. His opening partner Vijay too hasn’t shown the charisma. That’s why it is important that both Miller and Maxwell fire.”Out batting top-order needs to click to turn the things around in the coming matches. We have not been able to do that,” Miller assessed after the match against Delhi.Their bowling too, has been susceptible. Retired Australian pacer Mitchell Johnson is not the bowler he used to be, while young medium pacemen Mohit Sharma and Sandeep Sharma have been inconsistent.advertisementLeft-arm spinner Axar Patel has been Punjab’s best bowler but he hasn’t go support from the other end to make any kind of impact.In this case, Miller may drop Australian left-handed batsman Shaun Marsh and bring in all-rounder Marcus Stoinis, who played the game against Lions, scoring 33 runs and picking a wicket.Punjab’s opposition, Pune too has been coming off a seven-wicket loss to Gujarat. Mahendra Singh Dhoni-captained Pune was impressive in its opening match but showed a lot of chinks in its armour in the second.Gujarat opening batsmen Aaron Finch and Brendon McCullum tore apart Pune’s bowling — which should be a worry for Dhoni. Pacers R.P. Singh and Ishant Sharma have been inconsistent — even though spinners Ravichandran Ashwin and Murugan Ashwin have made amends for them. Gentle medium pacer Rajat Bhatia too has been impressive.It will be interesting to see if Dhoni sticks with left-armer R.P. Madhya Pradesh seamer Ishwar Pandey and Irfan Pathan might get a look in, especially the Baroda left-armer as he also can contribute with the bat.Otherwise, Pune’s batting looks solid with the likes of Ajinkya Rahane, Faf du Plessis, Kevin Pietersen and Steven Smith in their ranks. Dhoni is yet to decent chance to wield his bat, while Australian all-rounder Mitchell Marsh adds depth to the squad.last_img read more