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The 40 tonne axleload will come

first_imgbut track and train need common management’CONSIDER a new heavy haul railway with 40 tonne axleloads and high adhesion locos hauling frequent trains at 120 km/h, and suppose it damages your business. What are you going to say to your business manager?’ This warning from Harry Tournay of Spoornet was issued to nearly 400 engineers and specialists in the heavy haul freight business at the Sixth International Heavy Haul Conference held in Cape Town on April 6-10. Delegates had spent three days deliberating on engineering advances that would allow them to haul more tonnes at lower cost. While the iron ore market has recovered from the slump of the mid-1980s, thanks in part to rising steel demand in China and other booming Asian economies, Ben Alberts of South Africa’s Iron & Steel group ISCOR said that ’the price in real terms is in constant decline’.It was against this background that Spoornet Chief Executive Braam le Roux reminded delegates that the IHHA ’was not a very natural partnership because the customers are international competitors’. How refreshing then, that IHHA members are still willing to share their expertise in the unending search for the ideal wheel-rail interface where wear is controlled to the practical minimum. Much progress has already been made – in the last 10 years, according to the IHHA’s first chairman Dr Bill Harris, rail life has been extended from 600 million to 2 billion gross tonnes. All heavy haul railways stand to benefit from the unique fund of knowledge and research that exists within the IHHA, as do other railways with lower tonnages who experience the same wear problems over longer timescales.Le Roux urged delegates ’to push the limits beyond those which enable sound sleep’. This will require the courage to exploit advanced technologies, which could include automated train health checking, ’smart’ trains with on-board rolling stock monitoring and perhaps crewless operation, optic fibre rail integrity checking, and ground penetrating radar to ensure the subgrade is in good fettle. Perhaps the biggest challenge is to go beyond the 38 tonne axleload limit already being contemplated by BHP in Australia’s Pilbara, with 40 tonnes and beyond forming the quantum leap that Tournay saw as missing in topics up for debate at the conference.In contemplating the advance beyond current axleload limits, Harris warned that it was ’imperative to treat the railway as a system’ and cited the cost in terms of track wear in North America in the 1970s after many railroads introduced so-called 100 ton cars (loaded weight 119·3 tonnes) – ’it wasn’t long before the subgrade let us know that it wasn’t very happy’. Outgoing IHHA Chairman John Reoch considered separation of operations from infrastructure to be ’fundamentally flawed’, a view supported by Roy Allen, Vice President, Research & Test, at the AAR who pointed to rail grinding that had contributed to a spate of derailments affecting double-stack trains.It will be instructive to see how aspiring IHHA members in Sweden (operator MTAB and infrastructure authority Banverket) handle the planned upgrade to 30 tonne axleloads on the Luleå – Kiruna – Narvik line; the price of getting it wrong could be high. To find out what transpires, rendez-vous in Russia in 1999 for the IHHA’s next specialist technical session on the wheel-rail interface. olast_img read more

Real Madrid aiming for 30% stadium reopening in October

first_imgHowever, with restrictions set relax when the 2020-21 campaign begins in September, stadiums across the country could allow a percentage of fans to return. With La Liga suspended since March, the Spanish giants have brought forward the scheduled redevelopment of their 81,004 seater home ground. The project has progressed rapidly in recent weeks, with Los Blancos now confident of a partial reopening later in the year, according to reports from Marca. Read Also: La Liga: Messi on fire as Barca step up preparations for restart With the Santiago Bernabeu out of action this summer, Real Madrid will complete the season at the Estadio Alfredo Di Stefano. The 6,000 capacity stadium is based at the club’s training complex in Valdebebas in the north east of Madrid. Current public health guidelines surrounding coronavirus mean all remaining league games in 2019-20 will be played behind closed doors, as the season resumes on June 11.Advertisementcenter_img Real Madrid will push ahead with ambitious plans to allow 30% of their fans to return to the renovated Estadio Santiago Bernabeu by October. Loading…last_img read more

Kyle Lofton has become St. Bonaventure’s silent floor general as a freshman

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 29, 2018 at 10:22 am Contact Danny: [email protected] | @DannyEmerman Through his first 12 games at St. Bonaventure, freshman Kyle Lofton has proved point guards don’t need to bark out instructions to be effective. He knows he can be a leader without being the loudest in the locker room and on the court. “He’s vocal when he has to be, but he’s not the loudest kid,” Tom Espinoza, who coached Lofton at Putnam (Connecticut) Science Academy, said. “Kyle has that leadership quality. People just go with him and respect him — it’s amazing.”Lofton, St. Bonaventure’s silent floor general, developed a jump shot after scouts questioned his shooting ability. After earning no Division I offers, he proved himself at Putnam, where he helped win the school’s first prep national championship. In his first 12 games for St. Bonaventure (4-8), Lofton leads in the team in assists (4.0 per game) and logs the second most minutes (36.6). But entering Saturday’s game versus Syracuse (8-4), the 6-foot-3 point guard will have to learn to overcome his soft-spoken personality to thrive in the Carrier Dome’s rowdy environment.Instead of being vocal, Lofton leads by example. He knows every play from each position and often reminds his teammates where to be in practice. He soaks in advice and wisdom from his more experienced teammates and applies it in games.Lofton has always been soft-spoken, teammates and coaches said. Still, he often struggles to communicate, a necessary skill for point guards at the highest level, SBU senior Nelson Kaputo said. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think he’ll just become more vocal the more comfortable he gets playing the game of college basketball,” Kaputo said. “At the end of the day, he’s still a freshman … so he has a long way to go.”At Putnam, when some of his teammates signed with D-I schools and left campus before graduation, Lofton stayed and locked himself in the gym to continue improving his jump shot even after the season ended. Lofton improved his jumper and studied the intricacies of pick-and-roll offense, learning how to read a defense while there. He built muscle and became a better leader on the court. As his play grew more confident and aggressive, his shot followed. Lofton has an unconventional shooting form where he removes his guide hand from the ball a half-second before releasing the ball. After scouts questioned his outside stroke, Lofton shot 40 percent from beyond the arc at Putnam and currently shoots at a 34.4 percent clip with the Bonnies. “It was unbelievable what he did with us,” Espinoza said. “So it’s not a surprise what he’s doing at Bonnies.”He’s brought that same work ethic to St. Bonaventure in his first year. In addition to his passing and “elite” defense, Espinoza said, Lofton has also taken a scoring role, averaging 13.9 points per game, third-most on the team. He dropped 23 points at Vermont, 20 against Boise St. and 15 versus then-No. 17 Buffalo. At St. Bonaventure, Lofton often prefers to put his teammates in positions to score by passing to them in their spots, Kaputo said. Against Syracuse’s 2-3 zone, Lofton plans to be aggressive, looking for passing lanes to his teammates at the high post, he said. The biggest difference between D-I and the prep league, Lofton said, is the pace of play. He didn’t expect to play this many minutes this early in his freshman year, and he admits to feeling fatigued in some games.The speed of Saturday’s game against Syracuse may be more of what Lofton’s accustomed to. According to teamrankings.com, SU averages 69.4 possessions per game, 294th out of 353 D-I programs. Though Syracuse has struggled offensively, they remain tough at home, with a 7-2 record in the Carrier Dome. However, Lofton may get an extra boost from playing in the same arena as Carmelo Anthony, his favorite player growing up. Lofton’s envisioned his Dome debut since middle school, when he dreamed of lacing up orange shoes for Syracuse. In the raucous crowd of his childhood dreams, Lofton may struggle with the sole element of his game that’s held him back — he’ll need to make his voice heard. “It’s gonna be loud,” Lofton said. Commentslast_img read more