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Senior Class Council tickets vie for votes

first_imgTwo tickets will compete to be elected to the executive board for Senior Class Council. Elections will take place today from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., according to Judicial Council. Because tickets for Junior Class Council and Sophomore Class Council ran unopposed, they were declared winners by Student Senate last Wednesday.Eric Richelsen Senior Class CouncilKatelyn Wray, Clare Geraghty, Zach Bequette and Celanire Flagg designed their platform to focus on four main pillars — experiencing the city of South Bend, providing outlets for students to develop professionally, building lasting memories with friends and leaving a class-wide legacy at Notre Dame.“Utilizing the diversity of the senior class, we strive to have programs that bring the entire community together and create opportunities for people who may no longer be involved through dorm life,” Wray, the ticket’s presidential candidate, said in an email. Wray said the ticket has identified events affiliated with each pillar that are both feasible and innovative, including a signature class of 2017 event during Antostal, a class service day and an event for seniors to take professional headshots to use in résumés or portfolios.“Remember how fun Hip-Hop Night was freshman year? We are going to make Legends great again with Senior Night. Live music, cheap drinks and all of our friends in one place — Legends, as Legends was meant to be,” she said.Wray, Geraghty and Flagg all served on Sophomore Class Council, and Wray currently serves as vice president of Junior Class Council. Geraghty, the ticket’s vice presidential candidate, now serves as Cavanaugh Hall president. Bequette serves on the Club Coordination Council, which allocates funds to student groups on campus and facilitates University-club interactions, in addition to being a member of the officer board of the club sailing team.Geraghty said the ticket’s top priority is to foster a tight-knit class community, despite the fact many seniors live off campus.“It can be difficult to have class cohesion when everyone has such diverse involvement and interests within the Notre Dame community,” she said. “ … It is our goal to extend our reach to the entire class by putting on events that all members of the class will genuinely enjoy. We are dedicated to bringing the class together for a final year under the dome and making memories to last a lifetime.”The other ticket for Senior Class Council consists of Patrick Tinsley, Noelle Gooding, Jake Dunigan and Andrew Thomas. The campaign said the central theme of its platform is “the notion of building bridges.”“Senior year, for many, represents a number of separations — separating from your on-campus friends if you move off campus, separating from college life when you graduate and separations between different aspects of Notre Dame student life as a whole,” Tinsley, the ticket’s presidential candidate, said in an email. “Our goal is to bridge those separations.”The ticket hopes to work with University administration to improve the shuttle system to and from off-campus housing sites and designate certain parking spots closer to academic buildings for off-campus students for a limited period of time during the day, Tinsley said.“At the core of our platform lies a tremendous respect for next year’s graduating class,” he said. “As to-be seniors ourselves, we respect the remaining time we have at this university, time that should be used most effectively during our last year.”Tinsley said that if elected, the ticket also plans to host regional mixers that would allow students to meet classmates that plan to work in the same city after graduation.“Meeting some other soon-to-be Notre Dame alums who also will be living in an area might help ease that transition and provide you with a built-in network of friends before you ever arrive at your job,” he said.No members of the ticket have served on a class council before, which Tinsley said would allow the group to provide a fresh perspective to the role. Tinsley served as the Transfer Welcome Weekend co-commissioner last fall and is currently the Student Union Board representative for Alumni Hall and a dorm judicial council member. Gooding is president of Notre Dame’s branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and has been active in her dorm’s hall council in the past. Dunigan co-founded and is currently vice president of Notre Dame’s chapter of Young Americans for Freedom, while Thomas currently serves as the Stanford Hall senator.The ultimate goal of the ticket is to bring seniors together with events like class Grotto trips, service projects, South Bend Cubs games, a senior class formal and a revamped Senior Week, Tinsley said.“It’s our last ride — we want to make it count,” he said. “Four years is all we get with our friends, roommates and fellow Domers. In recognition of the fleeting nature of our college years, we are hoping to provide several events for the senior class as a whole to better cherish and appreciate our final year together.”Junior Class CouncilSara Dugan, Janet Stengle, Paul Stevenson and Matthew Peters said they hope to foster a sense of unity between members of the junior class, both on campus and in study abroad locations.“For the first time since we have gotten to Notre Dame, our class will be significantly separated,” Peters, who will assume the position of secretary, said in an email. “We will be divided by oceans, with students studying in countries across the globe. Furthermore, our class will be significantly subdivided into their respective majors. For these reasons and many more, it is not hard for the junior class to appear divided or fragmented. It is our goal to mitigate these effects.”The executive board plans to increase advertising for class council events, such as South Bend Cubs games and brother-sister dorm Olympics, to increase participation and maintain accountability, Dugan, Junior Class Council president-elect, said.“Junior Year is a unique time for students at Notre Dame,” she said. “As the Junior Class Council executive board, we really want to focus our efforts on catering specifically to those unique qualities. In addition, we hope to bring the Junior Class Council’s events to the attention of campus by staying visible, both online and around campus, and to stay accountable to our goals by adhering to the plans we make at the beginning of our term.”Dugan currently serves as Parliamentarian for the Ricketts-Ruelas administration and works as a student assistant in the Student Activities Office. Both Stengle and Stevenson served on Freshman Class Council and Sophomore Class Council. Stevenson also works for the Orientation Steering Committee and the University Communications Department. Peters has had no student government experience. Stengle, who will serve as vice president, said they plan to restructure Junior Class Council based on feedback and experiences from previous years.“Our goal is to assign task forces during the council application process based on work style, strengths and personalities to ensure that each event is executed to its fullest potential,” she said. “This will also allow for members of the council to hold greater responsibility and to build camaraderie through collaboration.”Sophomore Class CouncilMichael Conlon, Mary Ninneman, Jane Driano and Chris Lembo said they hope to recognize the diversity of their class and use it to bring people together during the upcoming year.“We would like to be a more open class council,” Conlon, who will assume the role of president, said in an email. “It is our responsibility to serve our constituents in the class of 2019 and to promote their ideas in future decision-making.”Conlon said his executive board plans to host events that promote class unity through prayer, service and fun.“There is no better instrument of unification than serving our South Bend community,” he said. “Additionally, we will offer opportunities to reflect on our Notre Dame experience together.”All four members on the ticket serve as officers on the current Freshmen Class Council, Conlon said. “With our previous student government involvement and individual interests, we look forward to serving our class for another year to the best of our abilities,” he said. “We have formed extensive connections in the Notre Dame administration and the other class councils, and we look forward to collaborating with and expanding our network to further foster community within our class.”Tags: class council elections, junior class council, senior class council, sophomore class council, Student governmentlast_img read more

Robots in Agriculture

first_imgAutomated data collection and analysis pipelines are changing the way humans generate and use information. At the University of Georgia, researchers harness the power of advanced sensing, robotics and big-data analytics to change agriculture.From streamlining the development of new crop varieties to improving cultural practices to enhance soil health, advanced sensing and robotics are key to developing more productive, sustainable agricultural systems.About 50 UGA researchers gathered for the inaugural Phenomics and Plant Robotics Center (PPRC) Symposium on March 9 to discuss how advances in these areas are changing the world of agriculture.A phenotype is a physical or biochemical trait that is controlled by a single gene or a set of genes inside a plant or animal’s total genetic code, and an animal or plant’s phenome is the collection of all of the animal or plant’s individual physical and biochemical traits. Phenomics is the study of these collections of traits across a population, and it’s the subject of the new PPRC at UGA.Housed in the university’s Office of Research, the center is led by engineering Professor Charlie Li. It was founded in 2018 and includes 35 UGA faculty members from 17 UGA units and four colleges, including the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.“Our center will promote convergent research between plant breeding, genomics and biomass characterization; engineering; and computational sciences to propel UGA into a global leadership position in phenomics and plant robotics,” Li said. “The University of Georgia is exceptionally positioned to take the lead in this area because of its burgeoning informatics initiative, the growing strength of our College of Engineering and our world-class plant science research.”The center’s founding members include Li; Harald Scherm, CAES professor and plant pathology department head; Scott Jackson, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, CAES crop and soil sciences professor, and director of the UGA Center for Applied Genetic Technologies; Alexander Bucksch, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences assistant professor of plant biology; and Ping Ma, Franklin College professor of statistics specializing in bioinformatics, functional data analysis and geophysics.The PRCC’s goal is to foster the development of high-throughput phenotyping technologies using robotics and big-data analytics to aid in breeding more sustainable, productive crops by identifying individual plants, amongst the thousands in crop field, with traits that breeders want to emphasize in new varieties. For instance, a robot could use computer vision and deep-learning neural networks to find plants with ideal root structures or ideal growth habits.The center supports research into the development of these types of systems by providing continuing education for faculty through an annual symposium and a series of regular brown-bag seminars on robotics and phenomics. The center will also support partnerships with universities and research centers outside UGA, offer development workshops, help UGA administrators pinpoint specific research needs and recruit faculty to fill those needs.The inaugural symposium included presentations from Penn State University Distinguished Professor John Lynch, a plant physiologist, and Regents’ Professor of Crop and Soil Sciences and Genetics Andrew Paterson, a UGA plant geneticist and breeder.Lynch, a world-renowned root physiologist, currently uses phenotyping robots to select corn plants with root systems that maximize their uptake of phosphorus from the soil, which could lead farmers to apply less fertilizer to their land but still produce healthy corn crops.Geneticists often look for one favorable trait — high yield, for instance — and then spend years searching for the genes that control that one trait so that it can be bred into future generations of the crop, Lynch told the crowd gathered at the symposium. He argued that the search for genes that control favorable traits is invaluably important, but it sometimes means that researchers can’t see the forest for the trees. Assessing all of the traits in a successful adult plant allows breeders to see how multiple traits work together to keep a plant healthy and productive. That’s where robotic phenotyping and the study of phenomics is invaluable.Paterson presented his collaborative work with Li. They use crop-imaging robots at the CAES Iron Horse Farm to identify crops with traits he would like in future varieties of staple crops.“One of the reasons that breeding proceeds slowly is because phenotyping is laborious,” Paterson said. “In my lab, I’ve been known to have phenotyping parties where we take the whole lab out to the field, and we measure and count and weigh and harvest. It might go on for days or weeks. We spend a lot of time measuring plants and measuring plant traits.”Phenotyping robots that can gather and analyze information about plants would greatly speed up the selection process involved in breeding better-adapted plants into new crop varieties.Some of these technologies are already used to spot diseased plants or plants under drought or heat stress. Farmers use this information to pinpoint where irrigation, pesticide and fertilizer applications are necessary in an effort to minimize the impact on water and soil resources and to reduce costs.As the center produces new technologies to breed more sustainable, resilient crops and to help farmers practice more precise agriculture, robotics will become a key part of meeting the world’s growing demand for food while protecting the natural environment.For more information about the center and its work, visit pprc.uga.edu.last_img read more

Arsenal and Tottenham in race to sign Dries Mertens from Napoli

first_img Comment Advertisement Mertens could be available on a free transfer next summer (Getty Images)According to Il Mattino, both Arsenal and Tottenham have registered their interest in signing Mertens.The report claims that both Premier League sides have ‘taken information’ on Mertens ahead of a potential move.AdvertisementAdvertisementBut Juventus, AC Milan and Inter are also reportedly interested in signing the Belgian.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CitySpeaking about his future last month, Mertens admitted he could leave Napoli at the end of the season.‘I still don’t know what my future will be,’ he said.‘My objective right now is to have a very good season with Napoli. Then we’ll see how things go. There’s still some time left until the end of the season.‘Here at Napoli, I still have seven months left on my contract. I don’t know where I’ll be playing next season.‘At the end of this year, I’ll assess whether to renew my contract or not, but it’s still too early. I’m not in a position to rule anything out.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisement Arsenal and Tottenham in race to sign Dries Mertens from Napoli Dries Mertens is wanted by Arsenal and Tottenham (SIPA USA/PA Images)Arsenal and Tottenham are in the race to sign Dries Mertens from Napoli, according to reports.The 32-year-old’s current contract with the Serie A club expires at the end of the season and he is yet to agree a new deal.Mertens is currently in his seventh season at Napoli and is a key part of their attack with 116 goals for the Italian club.But Napoli risk losing the Belgium international next summer with several clubs lining up for his signature.ADVERTISEMENT Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 13 Nov 2019 11:09 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy linklast_img read more

NBA free agency rumors: Kyrie Irving may prefer Nets over Knicks

first_imgThe six-time All-Star, who grew up in New Jersey, is averaging 23.9 points and 7.1 assists for Boston this season. He’s shooting 49 percent from the field and 39.8 percent from 3-point range.The Celtics entered play Sunday in fourth place in the Eastern Conference with a 45-32 record. Irving did not play in their loss this weekend to the Nets. The Knicks had been viewed as a front-runner to land Irving, but he may actually prefer to sign with the Nets, the report says.David Griffin, who was the general manager of the Cavaliers while Irving played there, said recently he believes Irving is more likely to join Brooklyn. Related News Kobe Bryant’s advice to Kyrie Irving: ‘Figure out how to connect with’ your teammates Rockets’ Mike D’Antoni praises ‘remarkable’ James Harden after 50-point triple-doublecenter_img Kyrie Irving could have multiple options in New York if he elects to leave the Celtics this summer.The Knicks and Nets are both expected to pursue the 27-year-old star if he opts out of his contract and becomes a free agent after the season, according to a report from the New York Daily News, which cites unidentified league sources. “I think Brooklyn is the fit that’s better for him in terms of his mindset,” Griffin told NBA TV. “I think he likes what they’ve done there, culturally.”last_img read more

Lowell Thomas ‘Junior’ Coggins, 80, Oxford: Feb. 6, 1936 – May 31, 2016

first_imgLowell CogginsLowell Thomas “Junior” Coggins, 80, died May 31, 2016 at his home in Oxford surrounded by his loving family.Graveside services will be held at the Oxford Cemetery on Friday, June 3 at 2 p.m. No visitation is scheduled. Memorial contributions for Lowell can be made out to the Harry Hynes Memorial Hospice and may be left in care of Shelley Family Funeral Home of Winfield.Lowell Thomas “Junior” Coggins was born on February 6, 1936 in Cowley County to proud parents Thomas Lowell and Agnes (Dennett) Coggins. Lowell graduated from Arkansas City High School in 1953, after graduating he joined the National Guard and served from 1953-1956. On December 27, 1970 in Miami, Okla. Lowell was united in marriage to the love of his life, Marrietta (Whaley). Lowell loved staying busy, he was a hard worker and after spending 15 years in South Texas in the seafood industry, he worked in a variety of trades such as: maintenance for schools in the area, the Shangri La, Okla. golf course, the oilfields, and for Skyline Corporation. When he wasn’t working Lowell like to play Texas Hold ‘em, he enjoyed being a member of the Arkansas City American Legion Post #18, and he loved to fish. But most of all he loved to spend time with his family, especially his grandchildren and great-grandchildren.Survivors include: wife, Marrietta Coggins of the home; children: Debbie Davidson and husband Mike, Tammie Pingsterhaus and husband Kevin, Suzie Lauderdale and husband Daniel, Patsy Bowen, Walter Wood and wife Wanetta; sister Barbara Branson; 14 grandchildren and an abundance of great-grandchildren.He is preceded in death by his parents, 7 siblings, and daughter Dana Jean.last_img read more