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Crowds spill on to street to see ‘heavenly home’ sell at auction

first_imgNearly 100 people turned out to see 83 Bardon Esplanade, Bardon sell under the hammer for $947,500.Almost 100 people turned out to see a three-bedroom, one-bathroom colonial cottage on 395sq m in Bardon sell under the hammer for close to $1 million. Home sales on the rise MORE: Ms O’Dea said the sale was proof the market understood how tightly held and beautiful the area was.“People buy and die in these homes, because they’re so attached to it,” she said.While five bidders registered, the serious competition came down to a couple with a young child and a woman in her late 50s from Toowoomba who placed the winning bid. The sale is the second highest price achieved on the tightly held street.That being said the street is tightly held. Yesterday’s sale was the first since 2017, when three homes sold (including 19) and prior to that, two changed hands in 2014.Four properties have no sale date recorded in CoreLogic, which usually indicates they have been held in one family for at least 30 years.Ray White Paddington agent Judi O’Dea said 83 Bardon Esplanade sold for $947,500 under the hammer.According to CoreLogic the vendor purchased the home in 2005 for only $495,000, and Ms O’Dea said they had mixed emotions about the sale. According to CoreLogic, it was the second highest price to be achieved in the street, with 19 selling in 2017 for $1,610,000. The 2017 sale was of a substantially bigger home, with four bedrooms, two bathrooms and on a larger block of 513sq m. RELATED:center_img Period features include high ceilings, stained glass windows and leadlighting, timber fretwork, VJ walls, polished timber floors, french doors and a wrap around veranda..The potential parties were attracted to the location and then the home’s character.Being a traditional colonial cottage, with period features, including high ceilings, stained glass windows and leadlighting, timber fretwork, VJ walls, polished timber floors, french doors and a wrap around veranda.Ms O’Dea said the sellers had renovated and transformed the home.“But they kept the character of it,” she said.“The location there is a seriously just so beautiful.“Anyone who appreciates the foothills of Mount Coot-tha, the lovely stream across the road and Bowman Park with all the activity there, it’s just magic.“The community spirit and just the activity, the dogs and the people walking by. “It’s heaven.” >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE<< Cottage sells before second open home How superstars holiday in Oz “They were very teary about it, they were delighted to sell and very happy with their price,” Ms O’Dea said.“But the emotional attachment to this beautiful home, you just can’t replace and find an area like this and this beautiful home.”She said it was a “really good” auction, with five registered bidders and huge crowd spilling on to the street.“I just knew it would be and there was a big mix of neighbours and we had a hell of a lot of people through the house all the way through the five-week campaign,” she said.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agolast_img read more

The Hospice Gets it Right on Euthanasia

first_imgLegalising euthanasia gains support in BayBay of Plenty Times 3 June 2016Family First Comment: Head of Tauranga Hospice “From my experience at hospice and hospices around the country, is that when you get that life-limiting condition, or given there is no further treatment discussion with your specialist, initially there is a loss of hope and often people do question, what is life all for and everything else like that, but … after a couple of weeks of being looked after by hospice, anyone who has any questions of wanting to have an assisted death in some way, actually change their mind.”Well said!Waipuna Hospice chief executive Dr Richard Thurlow said he too was not surprised by the result, but said those answering in this, and other recent surveys may not be the most appropriate to answer.“We’re asking a population of people, who, this is possibly the first time they’ve thought about it,” he said. “Is that the demographic we need to be surveying, or is it actually the people who are in the period at the end of their life.”“From my experience at hospice and hospices around the country, is that when you get that life-limiting condition, or given there is no further treatment discussion with your specialist, initially there is a loss of hope and often people do question, what is life all for and everything else like that, but … after a couple of weeks of being looked after by hospice, anyone who has any questions of wanting to have an assisted death in some way, actually change their mind.”He said he thought funding was better to be directed into palliative care in hospice, and in hospital and in aged residential care.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/bay-of-plenty-times/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503343&objectid=11649652last_img read more