Tag: 上海夜网CU

Eagles Conquer Hilltoppers On The Diamond

first_imgThe Jac-Cen-Del Eagles whitewashed The Shawe Memorial Hilltoppers 10-0 in Varsity Baseball play at Madison.JCD vs. SM Baseball (5-6)Courtesy of Eagles Coach David Bradshaw.last_img

East Carolina’s Carden overcomes obstacles to become elite offensive star

first_imgShane Carden hadn’t yet played a full game of junior varsity football, and he was already faced with a tough decision.Injured while fielding a punt, Carden had to choose between competing in the final six games with a cast on his wrist, or playing it safe and letting the bone heal.He didn’t need to think twice.“The first thing going through my mind is, ‘How long until I can get back out there,’” Carden said. “I just hate being off the field. I don’t know how to describe it. I just hate not being out there with my teammates.”Now the starting quarterback at East Carolina, Carden has experienced a prolific beginning to his season, leading the offense to 83 points and two blowout wins.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHe set an ECU record with 447 passing yards in the team’s 52-38 opening-week win over Old Dominion.Despite an overbearing father, being overlooked by coaches and more time than he wanted on the bench, Carden has become, statistically, one of the best quarterbacks in college football. His success stems from wanting to be the best athlete in a family full of them.“I was very competitive with my older brother,” Carden said. “He was two years older than me, and he was a very good athlete. I wanted to be as good as he was at that time, even though I was two years younger. Whether it was backyard basketball or whatever, it’d usually end up in a fight with him kicking my ass.”Along with his baseball-playing brothers, Carden lived in a household where playing sports was the norm. His father Jay had an eight-year professional baseball career playing in the farm systems of the New York Mets, Atlanta Braves and Montreal Expos. His mother, a volleyball player, was the first female athlete ever to earn a scholarship to California Polytechnic State, and his uncle was the starting quarterback at Southern California.Carden’s attitude toward athletics didn’t deviate. He grew up playing many sports, but stuck with baseball and football more seriously in high school.So when Carden told his father that he was officially quitting baseball to focus full time on football, his father wasn’t happy.“I bet he had more ability than both of my other two boys that both played college baseball,” Jay Carden said. “When he said he wanted to concentrate full time on football, I didn’t know why necessarily. I hated to see him not playing a sport he was really good at.”Worried that his son might spend afternoons during the spring season at home on his couch, Jay Carden devised a daily workout schedule to help make sure he kept in shape for football season, said Shane’s mother, Scoti Carden.Although Carden wasn’t playing baseball, his father said he encouraged his son because he saw a lot of potential in him.“He would get the team out there working out in middle school in the summer in 100 degrees,” Jay Carden said. “He did the same thing all throughout high school. He always got better. You see a lot of kids in sports, they will reach a plateau, and they won’t ever get any better. I never saw that plateau in Shane.”Throughout Carden’s career, there were several moments that it appeared his plateau had been reached. In his sophomore year of high school, he was called up to the varsity team, but only to play cornerback. He finally earned an opportunity behind center when the starting quarterback got hurt for the year.“He never played (cornerback) before, but he wanted to do whatever it took to get on the field,” said Steven Leisz, his football coach at Episcopal High School in Bellaire, Texas. “He’s a gamer. That’s who he is.”At East Carolina, Carden was faced with a similar situation. He redshirted his freshman season and only appeared as a wide receiver once the next year. He lost the starting quarterback job before the start of his sophomore year.But when his competitor faltered, Carden stepped in. He completed 273-of-413 passes en route to 3,116 yards and 23 touchdowns. He was named the school’s offensive player of the year.Carden said even with the accolades and recognition he has been receiving since his ascent at ECU, there is still more to prove.“When you’re kind of underrated, to get over that and show people that you missed out on me, it’s always a good feeling,” Carden said. “There will always be people that say it’s lucky, but we’ve got to continue to prove those people wrong. I’ve always had a chip on my shoulder.” Comments Published on September 12, 2013 at 1:00 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

LA Lakers’ loss to Thunder features Kobe Bryant taking last shot despite Lou Williams’ career-high 44

first_imgThe Lakers’ leading scorer seemingly made every shot he took. He made countless baseline jumpers. He fooled opponents with his pump fakes to draw fouls. But it wasn’t enough as the Lakers fell, 117-113, to the Oklahoma City Thunder on Friday at Staples Center.The man was not Kobe Bryant. Instead, it was Lou Williams who posted a career-high 44 points by going 12 of 25 from the field, 5 of 14 from 3-point range and 15 of 15 from the foul line in 34 minutes.“I was just making shots,” Williams said. “Down the stretch, I made one, made two, get some free throws in and it snowballed from there.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error But it did not snowball into Williams taking the last shot. That still fell to Bryant, who went one-on-one against Thunder forward Kevin Durant. Though Bryant found space in the lane, his shot fell short with the Lakers trailing 115-113 with 3.2 seconds left. Afterwards, Lakers coach Byron Scott said it was up to Anthony Brown to inbound to either Bryant or Williams before adding he was “not mad either way.” Brown said he chose Bryant because he was open at the top of the key. And all of the Lakers believed Durant fouled Bryant before he even released the shot. “I did. It’s not a matter of opinion,” said Bryant, who posted 19 points on 8-of-20 shooting, six assists and four rebounds in 28 minutes. “You watch the play. [Durant] hit me right on the forearm at the end of the release. That’s why the ball went short.”Yet, Bryant clarified “it’s part of the game.” Williams thought the same thing about Bryant taking the last shot instead of him. After all, Williams took last-second shots in the Lakers’ season-opening loss to Minnesota and Thursday’s loss in Sacramento.“Obviously Kobe is going down as a Hall of Famer,” Williams said. “He has the confidence in me to take those shots. Some nights he’s going to take those shots. We live with the results either way.”center_img Williams nearly gave the Lakers (8-30) the result they wanted instead of losing their third consecutive game amid Thunder point guard and former UCLA product Russell Westbrook dropping 36 points on 11-of-24 shooting. He scored 12 consecutive points to give the Lakers a 98-97 lead with 6:26 left. He made a 3-pointer that gave the Lakers a 102-101 edge at the 5:13 mark. He converted on a layup for a 104-101 cushion with 4:18 left. He made six consecutive foul shots by baiting Andre Roberson and Serge Ibaka to foul him along the perimeter. “It seems like every game, he gets somebody” Scott said. “I don’t care how you scout him. He’s going to get you some way or another.”So much that Bryant argued Williams draws fouls better than he does. “My game has changed and evolved over the years from when I first came into the league as I am now. I’m not as athletic as I used to be and I cant play above the rim like I once did when I first came into the league,” said Williams, who then noted an ACL injury he suffered in the 2012-13 season. “I wanted to learn how to draw fouls and how to create contact and use my reputation as a scorer to bait guys into getting those fouls.”Add it all up, and Williams scored 23 of the Lakers’ 28 fourth-quarter points. Not bad for a player who has earned the trust of Scott as the team’s starting shooting guard despite shooting 41 percent from the field all season. “He kept us in the game. He was on fire,” Scott said. “Guys did a real good job of setting screens for him where he can get to a sweet spot. Then when he didn’t make it or had opportunities to run, we were able to find him.”The timing could not have been better for Williams, considering Scott said he would reevaluate his lineup following Friday’s game against the Thunder. That also coincided with Lakers rookie point guard D’Angelo Russell posting two points on 1-of-3 shooting and two assists in eight minutes after nursing pain in his right ankle. That happened a night after posting a career-high 27 points. Williams’ theatrics became so pronounced that it initially overshadowed the matchup between Bryant and Durant, who posted 24 points on 10-of-15 shooting in 39 minutes. “It’s always fun. I keep messing with him,” Bryant said, smiling. “I know what plays they’re going to run. I just try to take him out of the play and deny him the ball and force them to figure something else out.”Both Bryant and Durant had their moments against each other. In the second quarter, Bryant tried to get Durant to bite on a pump fake. But Durant swiped the ball away from him. In the third quarter, Bryant went one-on-one against Durant before sinking a right hook shot over him. Later in that period, Bryant drove into the lane over Durant to cut the Thunder’s lead to 75-74 with 4:43 left. Bryant also threw a bounce pass between Durant’s legs to set up Roy Hibbert for n open jumper, something Bryant credited toward playing soccer as a child in Italy.“I learned all the little tricks. Every time I play against him, he picks up some of those things,” Bryant said of Durant. “I had the good fortunate of playing with old guys. I learned a lot of old tricks.”But Durant provided the best trick. But unlike as he has done so many times in the past, Bryant could not carry the Lakers when it mattered. “I just didn’t want him to shoot a 3,” Durant said. “I applied pressure to him and forced him to a tough shot.”And in the Lakers’ eyes, a foul. So much that Scott argued Bryant “was fouled before he even shot the ball.” Yet, after the Lakers lost by 40 points and 35 points earlier this season to the Thunder, Scott told his team he “was proud of the way they’ve been fighting.”“If we continue to play that hard with that type of passion, that type of effort and intensity,” Scott said, “the wins will come.”last_img read more

Wellington Police Notes: Monday, Nov. 16, 2015

first_imgWellington Police notes for Monday, November 16, 2015:•8:14 a.m. Officers investigated a domestic battery of a known suspect(s) in the 600 block E. 22nd, Wellington.•10:31 a.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 200 block N. C, Wellington.•3:07 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1800 block N. A, Wellington.•5:39 p.m. Officers investigated stalking and criminal damage to property by a known suspect in the 1100 block E. 16th, Wellington.•5:55 p.m. Non-Injury accident in the 300 block N. High, Wellington involving vehicles operated by Stormie G. Higgenbotham, 53, Wellington and Dominque L. Vargas, 18, Wellington.•7:50 p.m. Officers took a report of a child in need of care in the 100 block Apple Blossom Lane, Wellington.last_img read more