Month: January 2021

iTunes U collects, distributes educational media

first_imgStudents can access Notre Dame on iTunes U by visiting itunes.nd.edu and selecting the “Launch iTunes U” icon.  Turner said several professors from the College of Science and the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) have used iTunes U to supplement audio and video resources with in-class work. He cited chemistry professor James Johnson and FTT professor Ted Mandell as two consistent contributors to the database. While the initiative is still in the initial stages of its development, Flory said the response has been positive, and members of the campus community are interested in viewing the available materials and contributing to iTunes U. “I think this provides another channel for us to tell Notre Dame’s story and share the intellectual community that we have here,” said Julie Flory, associate director for the Office of News and Information.  Cockerham said the public component of iTunes U is geared toward helping the University “broadcast its image outward” for alumni and prospective students, but that the private component to be accessed with a NetID and password is more student-oriented.“The hope is that this whole iTunes U project will give us a start towards an open courseware system,” Cockerham said. Universities such as Stanford and MIT have lectures and other course materials available online, he said, and iTunes U could be a helpful tool for students to use outside the classroom to catch up or review information. Cockerham said while student knowledge of the program is limited, he hopes to see it expand in the near future as the more “student-centered” aspects are developed.  “Once the private side is established, we will especially be able to reach out to clubs and student groups so they can begin to use iTunes U,” he said. “The Last Lecture series that has been promoted by student government is something that I would like to watch,” Cockerham said. “Now I can go and find something on iTunes that I missed.”center_img Launched in October 2009, the Notre Dame iTunes U database now provides students, faculty and alumni access to more than 1,000 video and audio files, said Paul Turner, academic technology services manager for the Office of Information Technologies (OIT).Apple engineered iTunes U to collect and distribute educational media to students and teachers at universities around the world, according to the Apple Web site. Turner said student work has been critical to the initiative and undergraduate projects contributed to about 50 percent of the development of iTunes U. Cockerham said the challenges in launching iTunes U mainly stem from the difficulty of assembling content from all over campus into a central location, as well as monitoring the content that will be presented on the site. “Professors like [iTunes U] because they can put all of their video and audio in one place in a way that is more efficient than Concourse,” Turner said. “And students like it because it is easy to sync up with iTunes for course material.” Popular downloads have included the Last Lecture series sponsored by student government and the videos from the Student Film Festival. “I think that the student body will appreciate having access to recordings of events on campus,” campus technology chair Casey Cockerham said. “I want to continue to challenge students to step up and be a part of the ownership of this project,” he said.last_img read more

Father Ted’s Fun Run to benefit local students

first_imgHoping to create opportunities for low-income and underserved prospective students, Notre Dame Upward Bound hopes that many will run this Sunday in order to help local students attend college. The third annual Father Ted’s Fun Run/Walk will take place Sunday at the Jordan Hall of Science at 3:30 p.m. Participants can either take part in a one-mile walk or a five- or 10- kilometer run.All proceeds from the event will go to Notre Dame Upward Bound, a program from the University’s Department of Education whose mission is to help local students from low-income backgrounds be the first in their family to attend college.“Upward Bound provides support and resources to students who have the potential to go to college but are often viewed as the least likely to succeed,” Alyssia Coates, director of Notre Dame Upward Bound, said. “We have a 100 percent success rate at graduating our students from high school and getting them into college.”Upward Bound is part of the Federal TRIO Programs that were established under President Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society in the 60s. Notre Dame President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh was a member of the committee that created TRIO and Upward Bound.“Fr. Ted was instrumental in creating the Upward Bound program and bringing it to campus. That’s why the Fun Run is named after him,” Coates said. “He has always had a great interest in the program and in making sure these students from low-income families have the opportunity to obtain higher education.”“We wanted to honor Fr. Ted’s dedication to the program by naming this event after him,” Upward Bound administrative assistant Deb Wisler said.The program enrolls students during their freshman year of high school and continues to support them throughout their high school years by “keeping them on track, providing tutoring from Notre Dame students, academic advising and having enrichment programming,” Wisler said.The program is completely free of cost for students and then helps to provide them scholarships once they are enrolled in college.The students, however, struggle to afford books and other items that are not covered by tuition one they’re enrolled in college. The Fun Run was developed three years ago to specifically address this issue. Fifteen students will benefit from its proceeds this year.“This fundraiser is geared solely to our graduating high school seniors,” Wisler said. “The students are very involved in the event. They go to friends and family to get sponsorships and they will walk or run at the event.”The students that are members of the program value the opportunity that has been presented to them courtesy of Upward Bound.“I work with these kids and they are incredibly bright and so motivated — a lot more than a lot of the kids that I went to high school with,” senior Erin Robey, a Fun Run organizer, said. “I think that it’s really good that they’re really trying to get involved in their futures and it’s a pleasure to help them out.”The Fun Run has grown and developed since it began two years ago and organizers are hoping for a larger turnout this year as more and more community members have become aware of the event.“Last year we had 200 participants and raised almost $9000 for our students,” Wisler said. “We’re hoping to increase by 100 participants this year.”The event aims to facilitate the relationship between Notre Dame and the South Bend community, especially since “there is such a disparity between the Notre Dame community and the community that is two minutes away,” Robey said.Wisler said Upward Bound and the Fun Run help to “serve as a bridge” between Notre Dame and South Bend and Coates believes both communities are trying to achieve the same goal.“We’re all looking to find out what resources are available so we can work together and be a collaborative community,” Coates said. “We need to unite and make sure the citizens in our community are developing into the citizens that we all want them to be.”last_img read more

Students display an “X for X”

first_imgThe impact one student made on the Notre Dame community was tangible Saturday, as thousands of people in the Notre Dame Stadium raised their arms in an “X” to honor his life and memory. Each time the marching band played the Celtic Chant during the first quarter of Notre Dame’s victory over Navy, cheerleaders led the student body in forming an “X” with their arms to honor Xavier Murphy, a fifth-year student and former resident of Zahm Hall who died Oct. 11 after a short battle with cancer. Corry Colonna, rector of Zahm and organizer of the Raise an X for X Campaign, said more people formed the “X” than he could have hoped for. The “X” not only continued throughout the game, but spread from the student section into the rest of the Stadium. “I just sort of looked up to the sky and thought, ‘He knows, he sees us,’” Colonna said. Colonna watched the game from around the 50-yard line with Murphy’s family. He said they were clearly touched by the showing of solidarity for their son and brother. Saturday would have been Murphy’s 23rd birthday. Senior Steve LaBrecque, a resident assistant in Zahm, said showing Murphy’s family just how much he meant to Notre Dame was one of the foremost goals of Raise an X for X. “The fact that his family was there, for them to be able to see the whole student body come together and realize that [Xavier] meant something to this community, and ND as a whole, for me that was the biggest takeaway,” he said. Senior Charlie Harig, Zahm Hall president, agreed. “The big thing for me afterwards was less about selling stuff, but more about [Murphy’s family] seeing ‘Wow, our son made an impact on a lot of people’s lives,’” he said. Senior Daniel Duffey, a resident assistant in Zahm, said “raising an X for X” during the game was the perfect way to remember Murphy, who was passionate about Notre Dame — and especially Notre Dame football. “It was a really fitting memorial for who Xave was — his love of Notre Dame football and Zahm,” Duffey said. Planning for the Raise an X for X Campaign began in September, when Murphy was first diagnosed with leukemia. The goal was that Murphy would see a number of people with their hands in the air for him while he watched the game from Riley Hospital in Indianapolis, where he was receiving treatment.   After Murphy passed, Colonna said the Zahm and larger Notre Dame communities pulled together to bring the campaign to fruition. Colonna said the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore, Student Activities Office (SAO), cheerleaders and leprechaun and football administration all went to great lengths to help make Raise an X for X a reality. “I’m humbled and immensely grateful for everything everyone did for Xavier and his family,” Colonna said. “It was such a good cause but so many people were willing to help out. [That] speaks a lot to who Notre Dame is.” Duffey said it was great to have the support of the student body in “sending the message about who Xave was.” “We definitely got the word out there,” he said. “We know he was looking down, we were definitely proud to have done it for him.” In addition to last Saturday’s events, the Raise an X for X Campaign also involves T-shirt and bandana sales, a Basilica mass and a blood drive. Colonna said T-shirts and bandanas were almost entirely sold out by the end of Saturday, but a few can still be purchased online at Student Shop ND. Proceeds from the T-shirt sales and other regular donations will go to the Xavier Murphy Student Scholarship Fund through the Office of Development at Guerin Catholic High School, Colonna said. Proceeds from bandana sales will go toward Relay for Life. On Nov. 4 at 5:15 p.m., Zahm will host a mass in the Basilica to honor those currently battling cancer and those who have died from the disease. Zahm priest-in-residence Fr. Jim Gallagher will celebrate the mass. Zahm will also hold a blood drive Nov. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the LaFortune Ballroom to benefit the Indiana Blood Center.last_img read more

RecSports supports students’ New Years Resolutions

first_imgNew Year’s resolutions can be notoriously difficult to maintain throughout the full 365 days of the year, especially when the goals involve personal fitness and exercise. Although she lacked success in keeping up with past resolutions, junior Colleen Bailey said this year would be different. “I make similar resolutions to be better about exercising and to improve my fitness every year, but I’m really serious about it this year,” she said. “My most tangible goal right now is to run the Holy Half Marathon, so I’ll do whatever it takes to get myself to that point.” Jennie Phillips, RecSports Assistant Director of Fitness and Fitness Facilities, said students like Bailey with New Year’s fitness resolutions need look no further than RecSports for assistance in meeting their health and exercise goals. She said RecSports offers students free consultations with RecSports staff for fitness equipment orientation, body composition and blood pressure exams. She said students could also participate in fitness classes, cross-country skiing and various special events sponsored by RecSports throughout the year. According to the RecSports annual facility usage report, 94 percent of the undergraduate student body used the Rolfs Aquatic Center (RAC), the Rolfs Sports Recreation Center (RSRC) or the Rockne Memorial at least once during the 2010-2011 school year. Phillips said this percentage remained relatively consistent, although RSRC fitness room usage tended to peak in the winter months. “February is typically our busiest month throughout the year,” Phillips said. “I assume some of it is due to New Year’s resolutions and spring break preparation, but it’s also partly due to the winter weather.” She also recommended writing down goals and scheduling ahead for exercise sessions, in addition to participating in enjoyable activities. “Play basketball, ice skate, cross-country ski, take a fitness class — whatever works best for you. I would recommend cross-training, or doing different activities, over the course of a week or even a day,” she said. Junior Mike Butler said he and a group of friends were making a collective effort to be more active this year. “I just want to make an effort to get some physical exercise on a more consistent basis, even if it’s just going to play basketball with some friends,” he said. “We want to have some fun while staying active.” Although the New Year inspires students to improve personal health at the beginning of each year, Phillips said fitness goals should be made year-round. “If you need to make a resolution for the motivation, that’s great, but hopefully you’ll be motivated for other reasons as well, such as overall health, improved sleep, better immune system functioning, stress management and improved concentration,” she said. Students with questions about fitness can contact Phillips at [email protected], while general RecSports information is available at recsports.nd.edulast_img read more

Pope Francis celebrates first Holy Week

first_imgROME – Pope Francis, the first South American pope in Catholic Church history, celebrated his first Holy Week last week by challenging the faithful to serve one another and calling for global peace. On Holy Thursday, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, former archbishop of Buenos Aires, washed the feet of 12 young detainees in the Casal del Marmo, one of Rome’s juvenile prisons, according to the BBC. “Help one another. This is what Jesus teaches us,” the pope said Thursday, according to the BBC. “I do this with my heart because it is my duty, as a priest and bishop I must be at your service. But it is a duty that comes from my heart and a duty I love.” “I love doing it because this is what the Lord has taught me.” Pope Francis led a Good Friday service in Saint Peter’s Basilica and the Stations of the Cross at the Coliseum. He read aloud meditations composed by young Lebanese members of the Church, calling for peace in a region “torn apart by injustice and conflicts,” according to the BBC. Pope Francis has brought a new sense of simplicity to the Vatican, according to BBC’s David Willey in Rome. He wears plain vestments and has not taken up residence in the lavish papal apartments. Saturday night was the Easter Vigil held in Saint Peter’s Basilica. Capuchin friar Fr. Raniero Cantalamessa delivered the homily, referencing Franz Kafka’s “An Imperial Message” to illustrate the difficulty of spreading the Word of Christ to the worldly, according to the BBC. “We must do everything to prevent the Church from becoming Kafka’s castle, where it is impossible for the messenger to get word out to the world,” Cantalamessa said. “So, we must have the courage to knock them down and return the building to the simplicity and linearity of its origins.” Pope Francis delivered his “Urbi et Orbi” message to the city of Rome and to the world after the Mass. He emphasized the importance of love and peace for communities that are needy and war-torn. “What a joy it is for me to announce this message: Christ is risen! I would like it to go out to every house and every family, especially where the suffering is greatest, in hospitals, in prisons,” the pope said, according to the English translation offered by the Holy See Press Office. The pontiff said Jesus Christ’s triumph over death should transform Christians’ lives. “What does it mean that Jesus is risen? It means that the love of God is stronger than evil and death itself,” he said. “It means that the love of God can transform our lives and let those desert places in our hearts bloom.” Pope Francis invited everyone to “accept the grace of Christ’s Resurrection” and “become agents of this mercy.” He prayed specifically that the conflicts in the Middle East, Iraq, Syria, Nigeria, the Congo, Central Africa and Korea would be resolved. “Peace in the whole world, still divided by greed looking for easy gain, wounded by the selfishness which threatens human life and family, selfishness that continues in human trafficking, the most extensive form of slavery in this twenty-first century,” he said. “Peace to the whole world, torn apart by violence linked to drug trafficking and by the iniquitous exploitation of natural resources!” To conclude his address, Pope Francis quoted a passage from Psalm 117:1-2. “Dear brothers and sisters, to all of you who are listening to me, from Rome and from all over … the world, I address the invitation of the Psalm: ‘Give thanks to the Lord for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever,” he said. “Let Israel say: ‘His steadfast love endures for ever.’”last_img read more

SMC presents Four-Year Promise

first_imgOn April 2, Saint Mary’s announced the Four-Year Promise, which guarantees students will either graduate in four years or the College will pay for their extra courses. Students must follow certain guidelines to be eligible for the promise, which will start with the incoming class of 2017, College President Carol Ann Mooney said. “This isn’t a recruitment strategy for us or a new initiative on campus,” Mooney said. “Our students have always worked closely with their advisers and professors to stay on track and achieve their goals. We offer the courses they need, when they need them, led by exceptional faculty who are dedicated to teaching.” Mona Bowe, vice president for enrollment engagement, said 93 percent of all students graduate within the four years already. “This promise is really just putting our money where our mouth is,” Bowe said. Bowe said the major guidelines for this promise include maintaining good academic standing, registering for courses at the assigned times, completing an average of 32 semester hours each year and being accepted into a major by the end of spring semester of sophomore year. “These are things that our students are already doing,” Bowe said. In this time of economic hardship, Bowe said the College would like future students and their families to know the College cares about their investment. “We want people to know that we know how huge of an investment a college education is,” Bowe said. Professor of communications Colleen Fitzpatrick said more and more research has been done on the expense of a college education. “If you look at the research, more and more quality degrees are taking more than four years to finish,” Fitzpatrick said. “Those extra years are lost money.” Bowe said the College has already received positive feedback on the new promise. “Other colleges referred to this new program as a contract,” Bowe said. “We wanted to call it a promise and we have received very positive feedback about this new promise. I gave a presentation in Grand Rapids a couple of weeks ago and the parents of incoming freshman were more than excited to hear about this guarantee.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at [email protected]last_img read more

Professor discusses U.S. empire

first_imgOn Friday, Laura Briggs, a professor of women, gender and sexuality studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, delivered a lecture titled “Imperialism as a Way of Life: Thinking Sex and Gender in American Empire,” in which she argued for the necessity of feminism in scholarship and activism.The lecture was the keynote address of the two-day American Empire conference, which was sponsored by several Notre Dame departments within the College of Arts and Letters.Briggs framed her argument within the field of U.S. empire studies, which was the focus of the conference and said the scholarship within the field is influential, though it is hard often difficult to see the results.“We live and work in the belly of a great war-and-money-making machine and if we’re serious about challenging it, we’re going to feel the sting,” Briggs said. “No one is going to thank us for our services as intellectuals, calling to people’s conscious what they know or suspect about academic freedom or educational opportunities. … And even worse, I want to tell you this is what success looks like.“In all my years as an activist I have never found myself on the front page of the New York Times, nor cited by the Secretary of State. … What I have learned from all this is simply that academics have a great deal of power to affect change, particularly when we act collectively, but nobody is going to tell us that, and we are going to have to look hard for the evidence that we are being effective.”Briggs outlined the feminist, gender and sexual implications of torture, microcredit lending and environmental issues, and ultimately said academics must remember feminism’s importance in empire studies.“As much fun as it is to complain about all of this, I’m more interested in actually making a case to those who, like me, are generally inclined to view feminism and issues of sexuality and reproduction generously, to think with more consistency about these issues,” she said. “A few years ago I found myself struggling to think of ways feminism still seemed important to me.“I want to suggest that feminism is not old nor passé nor liberal. On the contrary, I want to address the possibility that our work on empire will never be as good as it could be if we don’t attend to feminism and to gender and sexuality. Feminism … provides us with powerful intellectual tools and an important activist tradition in which to engage the study of empire.”Briggs concluded with her “manifesto for the continued urgency of our need for a feminist and queer politics that makes race and empire central,” and said scholars and the general public alike must keep feminism front and center when considering the issues of the American empire.“We cannot effectively contest torture without speaking of its sexualization,” she said. “We cannot push back against neoliberalism without recognizing how crucial its understanding of women and gender is to the work it is doing. We can’t resist extractive industries, climate change and the enclosure of the global commons … without feminist fiction or indigenous movements grounded in feminism.“We can’t make sense of how enemies are being produced without an analysis of the narratives of rescuing women and gays. We cannot, finally, do the scholarly or activist work that we want to contest U.S. empire without feminism.”Tags: American Empirelast_img read more

English professor examine La Santa Muerte folk figure

first_imgProfessor Desiree Martin, an assistant professor of English at the University of California, Davis, spoke Thursday in the Hesburgh Center Auditorium about the growing following of La Santa Muerte, a skeletal Central American folk figure whose name translates to Saint Death, in a talk called “Borderlands Saints: Reflections on Secular Sanctity and La Santa Muerta.”“It [the current version of the following] dates from roughly the early eighties, and it kind of really gained steam in the mid-nineties during the Mexican peso crisis of 1994”, Martin said. “The origin of Santa Muerte that goes further back — there is no consensus on when belief in Santa Muerte first arose. … She is sometimes linked to Saint Paschal Baylon [a Spanish Friar and Catholic Saint from the mid to late 1590’s], and she’s linked to a saint in France who appears as a skeletal figure and another saint from Oaxaca who looks like a skeleton, so there is no real consensus, but probably the roots are pre-colonial as there are indigenous gods that match their beliefs and take a skeletal form.”Martin said Santa Muerte controversially highlights a contemporary symbol of secular sanctity, where a profane figure is worshipped in a way that is not unlike the worship of a sacred figure.“Since Santa Muerte is so strongly associated with the profane, especially in relation to illegality or transgressivity, she is a particularly extreme example of the collision between the secular and the sacred. Santa Muerte is famous for being very miraculous and loyal but also for being a jealous, vengeful patron who requires the utmost devotion and respect,” Martin said. “Santa Muerte is not venerated for her purity but for her accessibility and for her resistance to the powerful forces of the state, the Catholic Church and wealthy elites.”Matin said the exchange at the heart of devotees’ interaction and relationship with Santa Muerte, however, highlights a darker aspect of the relationship between worshipper and figure. Martin showed clips from Eva Aridjis’s 2007 documentary “La Santa Muerte,” which depicted a woman praising Santa Muerte while in prison.“This woman, who paints murals and images of Santa Muerte for her fellow inmates, situates her art as both offering and commodity. She also openly identifies the death saint as both a provider and a guardian for her drug habit,” Martin said. “The woman seems neither to expect judgment of nor deliverance from her drug habit. Instead, she considers Santa Muerte a friend and companion who will not only protect her from an overdose, but will stay by her side as she gets high, perhaps implicitly participating in her illicit journey.”Martin says the ambivalent and two-faced nature of Santa Muerte is inherently contradictory, leading to her image as a disruptor of class, racial, gender and sexual hierarchies being downplayed in favor of an intimidating image of the pagan, the Satanic, or the criminal.“In reality, Santa Muerte threatens her critics because she helps her marginalized devotees, especially migrants, poor barrio residents, and most contentiously, criminals,” she said. “But for the majority of devotees, Santa Muerte’s dark side is not exclusively or even primarily linked to the criminal underworld. Instead, it manifests through the Death Saint’s purported jealousy and the price she supposedly exacts from believers who use her powers recklessly or who fail to pay her proper tribute.”Tags: Desiree Martin, Santa Muertelast_img read more

Jeopardy champ talks sexism, gaming

first_imgArthur Chu, 12-day Jeopardy champion and writer for The Daily Beast spoke Tuesday evening on the unhealthy views of women found in “nerd culture,” in a lecture titled “Your Princess is in Another Castle,” the second in the Men in Masculinity series sponsored by the Gender Relations Center.Chu said the increasing portrayal of “nerds” in films and television as awkward but benign characters belies the fact that there are implicit misogynistic attitudes promoted by groups within the nerd subculture.“One of the threads is the concept of sexual market value,” Chu said. “It’s the idea that sex is a transaction between man and woman, much like when you’re interacting with a vendor.”Chu said this transactional view is not only found within certain online communities of men who blame their frustrations on women but is also present in popular entertainment.“It sounds crazy. But it’s not that weird. It’s what you see in the battle of the sexes in sitcoms, where the husband and the wife hate each other,” Chu said. “It’s a trope so obvious that even the simplest video games for children use it, that you have to save the princess.”Chu said the frequent use of this trope in entertainment reflects a deeper societal tendency to view women as a prize.“It’s an old narrative; it’s a very powerful narrative of how things should be between men and women,” he said. “It’s built into every story that has the beginning end with the promise of the daughter’s hand in marriage for accomplishing this quest.”Chu said this view of relationships not only harms women but also dissolves the value of relationships.“At the end of the day a transactional view of relationships is a bad relationship,” he said. “The very nature of saying you deserve to be with someone for accomplishing some task means that the person that you want to be with is interchangeable with anyone.”In some cases, this “toxic” perception of relating with women leads to extreme violence, seen in the Virginia Tech and University of California Santa Barbara shootings, Chu said.“It’s often the least successful men — the guys who we think of as nerdy, rejected and pitiful — who are most resentful in this context, and therefore the most dangerous,” Chu said.Chu said the danger in dismissing “lone-wolf” spree killings as anomalies undermines the awareness that these acts are one part of a much larger problem by which women are negatively affected.“The problematic behavior lies on a spectrum,” Chu said. “But the behavior that we’re talking about is built into the assumptions of our society. The spectrum of antagonistic behavior based on a transactional view of sex and marriage is the idea that women owe you something.“No matter how much an individual woman might look for a man who doesn’t buy into this narrative, she’s going to be exposed to men who are on the toxic side of the spectrum.”Chu said countering this transactional view of women and relationships first requires a willingness to address the issue head on.“Just talking about it is a big deal,” Chu said. “When it’s the in the background, when it’s the assumed state of how things are, if you don’t put a name to it, it’s very hard to oppose it.“It is a big deal to recognize when these tropes come up, and recognize that they are tropes, that they are a specific way of looking at things that doesn’t have to be true.”last_img read more

Senior Class Council tickets vie for votes

first_imgTwo tickets will compete to be elected to the executive board for Senior Class Council. Elections will take place today from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., according to Judicial Council. Because tickets for Junior Class Council and Sophomore Class Council ran unopposed, they were declared winners by Student Senate last Wednesday.Eric Richelsen Senior Class CouncilKatelyn Wray, Clare Geraghty, Zach Bequette and Celanire Flagg designed their platform to focus on four main pillars — experiencing the city of South Bend, providing outlets for students to develop professionally, building lasting memories with friends and leaving a class-wide legacy at Notre Dame.“Utilizing the diversity of the senior class, we strive to have programs that bring the entire community together and create opportunities for people who may no longer be involved through dorm life,” Wray, the ticket’s presidential candidate, said in an email. Wray said the ticket has identified events affiliated with each pillar that are both feasible and innovative, including a signature class of 2017 event during Antostal, a class service day and an event for seniors to take professional headshots to use in résumés or portfolios.“Remember how fun Hip-Hop Night was freshman year? We are going to make Legends great again with Senior Night. Live music, cheap drinks and all of our friends in one place — Legends, as Legends was meant to be,” she said.Wray, Geraghty and Flagg all served on Sophomore Class Council, and Wray currently serves as vice president of Junior Class Council. Geraghty, the ticket’s vice presidential candidate, now serves as Cavanaugh Hall president. Bequette serves on the Club Coordination Council, which allocates funds to student groups on campus and facilitates University-club interactions, in addition to being a member of the officer board of the club sailing team.Geraghty said the ticket’s top priority is to foster a tight-knit class community, despite the fact many seniors live off campus.“It can be difficult to have class cohesion when everyone has such diverse involvement and interests within the Notre Dame community,” she said. “ … It is our goal to extend our reach to the entire class by putting on events that all members of the class will genuinely enjoy. We are dedicated to bringing the class together for a final year under the dome and making memories to last a lifetime.”The other ticket for Senior Class Council consists of Patrick Tinsley, Noelle Gooding, Jake Dunigan and Andrew Thomas. The campaign said the central theme of its platform is “the notion of building bridges.”“Senior year, for many, represents a number of separations — separating from your on-campus friends if you move off campus, separating from college life when you graduate and separations between different aspects of Notre Dame student life as a whole,” Tinsley, the ticket’s presidential candidate, said in an email. “Our goal is to bridge those separations.”The ticket hopes to work with University administration to improve the shuttle system to and from off-campus housing sites and designate certain parking spots closer to academic buildings for off-campus students for a limited period of time during the day, Tinsley said.“At the core of our platform lies a tremendous respect for next year’s graduating class,” he said. “As to-be seniors ourselves, we respect the remaining time we have at this university, time that should be used most effectively during our last year.”Tinsley said that if elected, the ticket also plans to host regional mixers that would allow students to meet classmates that plan to work in the same city after graduation.“Meeting some other soon-to-be Notre Dame alums who also will be living in an area might help ease that transition and provide you with a built-in network of friends before you ever arrive at your job,” he said.No members of the ticket have served on a class council before, which Tinsley said would allow the group to provide a fresh perspective to the role. Tinsley served as the Transfer Welcome Weekend co-commissioner last fall and is currently the Student Union Board representative for Alumni Hall and a dorm judicial council member. Gooding is president of Notre Dame’s branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and has been active in her dorm’s hall council in the past. Dunigan co-founded and is currently vice president of Notre Dame’s chapter of Young Americans for Freedom, while Thomas currently serves as the Stanford Hall senator.The ultimate goal of the ticket is to bring seniors together with events like class Grotto trips, service projects, South Bend Cubs games, a senior class formal and a revamped Senior Week, Tinsley said.“It’s our last ride — we want to make it count,” he said. “Four years is all we get with our friends, roommates and fellow Domers. In recognition of the fleeting nature of our college years, we are hoping to provide several events for the senior class as a whole to better cherish and appreciate our final year together.”Junior Class CouncilSara Dugan, Janet Stengle, Paul Stevenson and Matthew Peters said they hope to foster a sense of unity between members of the junior class, both on campus and in study abroad locations.“For the first time since we have gotten to Notre Dame, our class will be significantly separated,” Peters, who will assume the position of secretary, said in an email. “We will be divided by oceans, with students studying in countries across the globe. Furthermore, our class will be significantly subdivided into their respective majors. For these reasons and many more, it is not hard for the junior class to appear divided or fragmented. It is our goal to mitigate these effects.”The executive board plans to increase advertising for class council events, such as South Bend Cubs games and brother-sister dorm Olympics, to increase participation and maintain accountability, Dugan, Junior Class Council president-elect, said.“Junior Year is a unique time for students at Notre Dame,” she said. “As the Junior Class Council executive board, we really want to focus our efforts on catering specifically to those unique qualities. In addition, we hope to bring the Junior Class Council’s events to the attention of campus by staying visible, both online and around campus, and to stay accountable to our goals by adhering to the plans we make at the beginning of our term.”Dugan currently serves as Parliamentarian for the Ricketts-Ruelas administration and works as a student assistant in the Student Activities Office. Both Stengle and Stevenson served on Freshman Class Council and Sophomore Class Council. Stevenson also works for the Orientation Steering Committee and the University Communications Department. Peters has had no student government experience. Stengle, who will serve as vice president, said they plan to restructure Junior Class Council based on feedback and experiences from previous years.“Our goal is to assign task forces during the council application process based on work style, strengths and personalities to ensure that each event is executed to its fullest potential,” she said. “This will also allow for members of the council to hold greater responsibility and to build camaraderie through collaboration.”Sophomore Class CouncilMichael Conlon, Mary Ninneman, Jane Driano and Chris Lembo said they hope to recognize the diversity of their class and use it to bring people together during the upcoming year.“We would like to be a more open class council,” Conlon, who will assume the role of president, said in an email. “It is our responsibility to serve our constituents in the class of 2019 and to promote their ideas in future decision-making.”Conlon said his executive board plans to host events that promote class unity through prayer, service and fun.“There is no better instrument of unification than serving our South Bend community,” he said. “Additionally, we will offer opportunities to reflect on our Notre Dame experience together.”All four members on the ticket serve as officers on the current Freshmen Class Council, Conlon said. “With our previous student government involvement and individual interests, we look forward to serving our class for another year to the best of our abilities,” he said. “We have formed extensive connections in the Notre Dame administration and the other class councils, and we look forward to collaborating with and expanding our network to further foster community within our class.”Tags: class council elections, junior class council, senior class council, sophomore class council, Student governmentlast_img read more