Month: December 2020

Investor group targets planned GE coal plant in Kenya

first_imgInvestor group targets planned GE coal plant in Kenya FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Thomson Reuters Foundation:A group of investors in U.S. conglomerate General Electric (GE) has publicly opposed its plans to buy a stake in a Kenyan coal-fired plant, claiming the project would damage the environment and undermine efforts to fight global warming.In a public letter to GE, nearly five dozen institutional and individual shareholders called on the company to reverse course on its intentions to purchase a 20 percent stake in a planned 1,000-megawatt coal plant on Kenya’s Lamu island.The move follows years of controversy over the Kenyan government’s plans to build East Africa’s first coal-fired power plant on Lamu, a United Nations World Heritage site. The project has divided communities, and environmentalists fear the plant will destroy the marine environment of the region, a tourist destination that is one of the best-preserved Swahili settlements.It was unclear how much GE stock the letter’s signatories hold. The information was not included in the missive, and their spokeswoman said she did not have the data. GE did not immediately answer an emailed request for comments.Among those signing the letter was the Local Authority Pension Fund Forum, an association of more than 70 United Kingdom-based public sector pension funds with about $300 billion in assets under management. Also signing were several religious groups.GE signed an agreement in May to design and help build the plant along with Amu Power, a consortium contracted with delivering the $2 billion project. With the deal, GE, through its affiliates, also will acquire a stake in Amu.More: Investor group opposes General Electric plans for Kenyan power plantlast_img read more

Latest U.K. offshore wind bids set new record, come in under $50/MWh

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Recharge:Offshore wind came in at a new UK record low of £39.65/MWh ($48.8/MWh) as it dominated contract-for-difference (CfD) awards for 6GW of renewable energy.Developments awarded 15-year deals under the latest CfD round include three 1.2GW projects at Dogger Bank developed by Equinor and SSE, and Innogy’s 1.4GW Sofia development, all off England, plus 454MW at the Seagreen project off Scotland.The low rate, at 2012 prices, marks a 30% reduction on offshore wind power costs seen at the last CfD round in 2017 when the lowest rate seen was £57.50.The UK government said the total of 12 new projects – six offshore wind, four remote island wind and two bioenergy – will power seven million homes once they are exporting to the grid by 2025.Richard Howard, research director at UK-based Aurora Energy Research, told Recharge the low prices were both “surprising” and “impressive,” while also noting the huge role the Dogger Bank zone – site of the three Equinor/SSE projects and Innogy’s Sofia – will play in the future sector.“Overall it is impressive the continuing cost decline for offshore wind. And part of that must have been predicated by the introduction of larger turbines,” said Howard. “You have heard this week about GE starting to get orders for the 12MW [Haliade-X] turbine. I think an important part of how you get the costs down to around £40/MWh will have been really big turbines on really windy sites on Dogger Bank.”More: Equinor, SSE and Innogy win as UK offshore wind hits cost lows Latest U.K. offshore wind bids set new record, come in under $50/MWhlast_img read more

India planning 1GW floating solar project in Madhya Pradesh

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Recharge:The state of Madhya Pradesh is planning a 1GW floating solar array that would be the world’s largest, according to reports from India.The floating solar plant is planned for India’s largest reservoir on the Indira Sagar Dam in Madhya Pradesh, in central India, said the Times of India, quoting the state’s renewable energy minister. “We have done preliminary studies and now [the] World Bank is preparing feasibility reports,” Manu Shrivastava told the newspaper.A 1GW plant would dwarf the world’s current largest floating PV array, a 150MW project in Anhui, China.Development would cost around 50bn rupees ($700m), according to Shrivastava, who hopes work on the project can start in about 8 months. The Madhya Pradesh would act as offtaker for 200MW from the plant, the report said.Floating solar arrays are an increasingly attractive option for large-scale PV deployment at reservoirs and alongside hydropower facilities, especially where land use is constrained elsewhere, according to a World Bank report on the sector published last year.About 1.1GW of floating solar was in place globally by mid-2018, the World Bank said.More: India plans world’s largest floating solar power plant at 1GW India planning 1GW floating solar project in Madhya Pradeshlast_img read more

Rock’s Greatest Replacement

first_imgGuitar Hero: With free time during Widespread Panic’s hiatus, Herring recently released a solo album.Jimmy Herring goes soloJimmy Herring has been asked to fill some big rock ‘n’ roll shoes. In addition to a half-year stint in the Allman Brothers Band following the departure of Dickey Betts, he’s played lead guitar for some notable Grateful Dead spinoffs, including The Dead and Phil Lesh and Friends, which found him reinterpreting the licks of Jerry Garcia. These days Herring is a full-time member of Widespread Panic—a role established following the untimely death of the band’s guitarist Michael Houser.With Panic mostly off the road this year, Herring took the opportunity to release a new solo album, Subject to Change Without Notice. Backed by a band of ace players from his Atlanta hometown, Herring uses the instrumental effort to deliver his fluid style through a range of genres from country rock jams to the spacey free jazz he explored two decades ago in his first notable band the Aquarium Rescue Unit. Ahead of a tour through the South this month that includes multiple stops in North Carolina and Virginia, Herring chatted with BRO by phone.BRO: You’re known for your work with well-established rock bands. When it comes to your solo work, what informs the various directions you take the music? JH: It comes from liking music from different places and cultures. For me, blues is the root of everything and from there my interests have grown to include a lot of jazz and funk, which is definitely heard a lot on this album. I cover the spectrum of American roots music that I listened to growing up, but the band and I also like to incorporate elements of Indian music and other sounds from abroad.On your new album you cover George Harrison’s “Within You Without You.” What makes you decide to interpret a lyrical song as an instrumental? To me, the human voice is the greatest instrument of all. But I don’t posses the ability to sing, so I try to do it with the guitar. If I am going to do a vocal tune, what grabs me is the melody. That song has such a strong melody, so when we’re playing it, I’m hearing the words and they’re coloring the way I play it in an instrumental situation.Jeff Beck is a master of playing vocal tunes on the guitar, and he’s a big influence. I also hang out with Derek Trucks, who plays guitar like a gospel singer. Hearing guys like that has also rubbed off on me.Some of the album hints back at the free jazz elements from your days in Col. Bruce Hampton and the Aquarium Rescue Unit, a band many feel broke up before reaching its potential. How pivotal was that group in your development as a player? My musical journey has been a little bit backwards. Guitarists generally grow up learning the fundamentals and how to serve songs appropriately. Usually you learn the rules before you break them. Bruce’s band was my first real band experience, and his philosophy is more about being in the moment. He’s really into Miles Davis and Ornette Coleman. The focus was on improvisation and changing the way things were played from night to night. It forced me to become fearless in my playing—not afraid to make a mistake.After my time in the Aquarium Rescue Unit I started getting calls from bands that wanted me to play more structured songs. In many ways I went from the avant-garde back to things that were more basic. It wasn’t always easy and not a path I would necessarily recommend to new players.You’ve been asked to fill some big shoes on the guitar. Who are your heroes on the instrument? My older brother had a tremendous record collection, so Jimi Hendrix and the Allman Brothers were in my DNA growing up. He also had a bunch of old blues stuff: Otis Rush, Albert King, and Freddie King. It was destiny for my brother to be my biggest influence.When the Allman Brothers called me, I didn’t believe it at first. The sound was already in my subconscious, but the struggle I had there was always thinking I was playing inappropriate things. The guitar sounds of Dickey Betts and Duane Allman are very distinct, so stepping out of that kingdom can send a song into another place that’s not in the expected style. I worried my vocabulary in free jazz wouldn’t sound right or I’d try to do too much. I admit that sometimes I play too many notes. I’m a long-winded person when I’m talking and playing.Since you’re now six years in with Widespread Panic, how have you settled in a permanent role with the band? The same struggles sometimes exist that I found in the Allman Brothers, but it’s a little different than playing with icons you’ve idolized since you were 14. Whenever you join a band that’s cultivated an established sound, you have to tip your hat to it. The difference in Panic is that the band members are my friends and my peers. I’ve known them since the late ‘80s; they used to bring Aquarium Rescue Unit out on the road and let us sleep on their hotel room floors. In the past six years the band dynamic has become a lot more fluid. They’ve never put any expectations on me, but I’m still always trying to make the right decisions for the music when we’re in the moment.  Fortunately I’ve only been encouraged to play my way. •last_img read more

Women’s Spring Running Gear

first_imgWith the crazy variable winter we’ve had, runners across the Blue Ridge are aching for a sunshine-filled spring, when we can dust off our running shoes and hit the trails for good. Or better yet, now could be the perfect time to upgrade some of your gear with these favorites. Race entry is open for some of the favorite spring runs, and when it comes to the list of things you need to keep track of on race day, your gear shouldn’t give you a headache.Here we’ve compiled an outfit to take you through your run, from a 5K to multi-leg race journey, these trail-tested items will carry you through, all while looking stylishly swift. WomensRunningApparel1 — Ambit2 (HR) by SUUNTOMaintaining your pace during a distance race is critical. While the excitement of race day can get your adrenaline pumping, resist the urge to race out of the gate by keeping an accurate eye on your pace and heart rate. The Ambit2 with the integrated Heart Rate system by Suunto makes it easy with a large pace display, lap comparisons by each kilometer/mile and scrollable options to view distance, speed, elapsed time, elevation, heart rate and calories burned. While you’re not out crushing it in a town race, the GPS-based watch offers an impressive bevy of other functions for outdoor adventurists.2 — Corsa Skort by ISISSlip into any piece by ISIS and you can instantly tell that it was designed by women, for women. Flattering cuts, styles, patterns and colors, backed by high performance materials, are what their pieces are known for. The Corsa Skort is no exception. The nylon and spandex short & skirt combination with stretch waistband is comfortable and chic, with a gusset crotch for movability. This will quickly become your go-topiece, having you feeling feminine yet fearless as you fly down the trails.3 — Unisex Ventilator Compression Support Calf Sleeves by CW-XCompression garments are all the rage, and with good reason. Why wait to sooth your legs until after the race, when you can begin the recovery process before you even begin? The Unisex Ventilator Compression Support Calf Sleeves by CW-X are engineered to provide muscle and joint support. The increase in blood circulation results in better endurance, less fatigue and faster recovery. The sleeve design allows you to pair them with your favorite running sock.4 — Women’s Running Ultra Light No Show by Point6Many a toenail was lost before the discovery of Point6 wool socks. The moisture wicking properties of wool prevent dampness from developing, keeping your toes dry and happy. The Running Ultra Light No Show by Point 6 is crafted of tightly knit merino wool, an antimicrobial, natural fiber that helps regulate your body temperature. The soft and snug fit stays put, alleviating blisters or hotspots, while the low cut ankle allows it to pair perfectly with any running shoe. After your run, slip on a pair of the Point6 Compression Ultra Lite OTC socks to aid in recovery. The “Over the Calf ” high rise sock, created with merino wool infused with Celliant fibers, aids in fatigue, reduces soreness and increases blood flow.5 – Women’s Coolest Cool Short Sleeve Top by ColumbiaThe intense midday sun in the Blue Ridge Mountains has become more bearable thanks to the Omni-Freeze Zero technology by Columbia. The sweat-activated cooling system in the Coolest Cool Short Sleeve top will keep you cooler than your competitors. While the Omni-Wick technology will keep you dry, pulling sweat away from your body, the Omni-Shade technology will keep you blocked from the Sun’s harmful rays. This triple action will keep you cool, dry and protected and you’ll coast stylishly down the trail while your fellow racers wondering what your secret is.6 — Bondi Speed by Hoka One One While the minimalist movement quickly saturated the market, Hoka One One made a push in the opposite direction. The first to pioneer the maximalist concept, the shoes are designed for runners of all levels. The oversized shoes are light, bouncy and nimble. Within the first hundred steps of wearing the Bondi Speed, you’ll be a believer. The cushioned midsoles deliver an almost trampoline-like effect. The large outsole footprint offers stability on trail or pavement, while minimizing impact, perfect for those with knee issues. Rather than hitting the pavement, you’ll feel as though you’re effortlessly running on vibrantly colored clouds. The fast-entry lacing system will get you out the door and onto the trial quicker than ever.7 — Jurek Endure by Ultimate DirectionPersonally designed by Scott Jurek, the Jurek Collection by Ultimate Direction provides runners with four hydration system options. The Jurek Endure is the perfect hydration belt for a mid-distance run. The belt comes with two ten-ounce bottles, for even weight distribution, keeping the belt from bouncing around. The construction of the bottle holsters is stiff enough to easily slide the bottles in and out, while still resting comfortably against your back. The front pocket allows for easy access to goos or gels, and the expandable back pocket can stash arm warmers or gloves. The waist belt is adjustable and comes with race bib clips.last_img read more

Oh the Places You’ll Go

first_imgThere. Much better. If that poem doesn’t give you a little burst of inspiration to go out and see the world, I’m not sure what will.THE LIST 1. Joyce Kilmer Memorial ForestWhy? To revel in the beauty of some big-ass old growth trees.2. Linville RiverWhy? To see the awe-inspiring, piss-your-pants rapids that are iconic of the gorge.3. Blue Ridge, GeorgiaWhy? I mean, the name of the town is Blue Ridge. I gotta go there. I’m surprised I haven’t been yet, honestly. Plus, the cycling scene there is off the chain (no pun intended, maybe).4. Chincoteague Island, VirginiaWhy? One word. Ponies.5. Cumberland Island, GeorgiaWhy? I mean, it captured the fascination of my editor for over 20 years of his life, enough so that he decided to write a biography about the island’s lone protector, Carol Ruckdeschel. It has to be good. Plus I like turtles.6. Edisto River, South CarolinaWhy? If not for the scenic flatwater paddling, then definitely the treehouse lodging.7. Everglades National Park, FloridaWhy? I know, I know. It’s not “technically” the Blue Ridge, but shoot – neither is half our territory! Plus, how sweet would it be to spend a week sea kayaking around the Everglades, camping on pristine beaches, watching the sun set over the horizon each night…I can almost feel the salt rash on my bum and the sunburn on my face now.8. Wilmington, N.C.Why? To go on a history tour of the town…NOT. I want to surf. Duh.9. The Fantastic Pit, GeorgiaWhy? Sounds dirty, and it is. Imagine a 586-foot vertical drop into Ellison’s Cave, the twelfth deepest cave in the United States.10. State College, Penn.Why? To get my ass kicked on a bike.11. Seneca Rocks, W.Va.Why? I’ve been there, seen it, but I actually want to climb that shit. It’s a classic.###That’s a good start, but I’d love to hear from you. Where should I go in 2015? Looking for adventure partners along the way! Per my last blog post, you’re well aware that I already have my mind made up about New Year’s resolutions. In general, I’d say I’m satisfied with that list. It’s succinct, realistic, common-sense.But you know me. I’m one of those annoying big-ideas type of people who could stay up into the wee hours talking about dreams and goals and never get anywhere with any of them but ride high on the energy of endless possibility for weeks after.So what’s the big thing that’s missing from that list? The thing that keeps me up at night, wheels turning? The thing that distracts me from writing this blog as we speak?Places.Like the great American writer and filmmaker Susan Sontag, I’m of the mindset that, “I haven’t been everywhere but it’s on my list.” I covered a lot of ground in 2014, from the coast of Carolina, to the cliffs of eastern Kentucky, to the highlands of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. But there are plenty of places I haven’t been, even in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic.But, before I launch into a detailed description of all the places I’d like to visit this year and why, let’s set the mood with a little Dr. Seuss, shall we?You have brains in your head.You have feet in your shoes.You can steer yourselfAny direction you choose.You’re on your own. Andyou know what you know.And you are the guy who’lldecide where to go.You’ll get mixed up,of course, as you already know.You’ll get mixed up withmany strange birds as you go.So be sure when you step,Step with care and greattact and remember thatLife’s A Great Balancing Act.And will you succeed?Yes! You will, indeed!(98 and ¾ percent guaranteed.)KID, YOU’LL MOVEMOUNTAINS!last_img read more

The Next 20

first_imgTwenty years ago when I started working at Outside magazine, I transcribed faxed story drafts into the computer because our office didn’t have external email. I read story edits on paper, which made the Number Two pencil the number one office tool. Jon Krakauer hadn’t yet climbed Mount Everest, “An Inconvenient Truth” was still 11 years away, and it was still possible to get lost in the wilderness without selfie documentation. My favorite piece of gear was a hot-pink, hard-tail Specialized Stumpjumper that cost approximately $8,800 less than the $9,300 S-Works Stumpjumper 29er advertised on Specialized’s website today. Instead of two short decades, it seems that eons have passed.What will the next 20 years bring? Considering that some people wonder if we’ll still have an inhabitable planet by the year 2047, it feels a little dubious to make any predictions beyond tomorrow. On the other hand, the future, as Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”I polled a few of the smartest people I know in the outdoor industry to find out what they think the future of travel, gear, and recreation holds. Then I added a few of my own predictions, ranging from fact-based reporting to pure fantasy, to create a list of 20. Some predictions may sound far-fetched, but the beauty of the future is that anything is possible—and nothing can be fact-checked.Outdoor Recreation “It is predicted that by 2050, 86 percent of the developed world will be urbanized with people living in dense communities. This shift will transform how we enjoy the outdoors. Close-to-home outdoor recreation will dominate. State and local governments will integrate parks, open space and trail systems into their city planning.” –Steve Barker, Interim Executive Director, Outdoor Industry Association“Outdoor recreation is going to continue its arc away from being just about big trips in remote wilderness and towards accessible experiences we can all have, even within cities. It has to go that way if we’re going to continue to engage new communities, from urban youth to urban professionals. Call it the democratization of adventure.” –Michael Roberts, Executive Editor, Digital Development, Outside MagazineGear“Light and fast will define the next 20 years of outdoor adventure and exploration. It will be the single biggest advancement to empower professional mountain athletes and dedicated global adventurers. With the ongoing evolution of outdoor products each season —from hard goods to performance apparel—that are weighing in lighter than ever before and creating more efficient systems, people are able to go greater distances in far less time, pushing the limits of what’s possible. Gear weight reduction alone in the past 20 years has allowed athletes to crash through their own (previous) training ceilings. Weight reduction and product innovation have opened the adventure door for the masses—not just a select few.”–Jordan Campbell, writer, mountaineer, filmmaker, and Marmot ambassador athlete“No matter if it is skiing, climbing, trail running or biking, gear will morph into a place where speed, lightness, technology, and performance will become one. The new GORE Surround technology (waterproof, breathable footwear with open construction on the bottom of the sole) is the perfect example of making something out of nothing.” –Eric Henderson, former backcountry ski guide for Jackson Hole Mountain Resort and communications manager for Salewa mountaineering products“Living in denser environments with less space will change how we buy products. Consumers will shift from a more, more, more mentality to buying less of higher quality items with more crossover lifestyle usages. There’s more opportunity to buy recycled and refurbished goods. This will be more important to future generations.” –Steve Barker“Sports like Nordic skiing that require snow have morphed into much less of a natural environment and more into a manufactured environment meant to look like what that natural environment used to be. You’re going to see reflections of that in the equipment: Ski bases will be more dirt repellent, poles will have reinforced tips to withstand the impact of shorter races, and ski waxes will be more concentrated around the freezing range because there’s more man-made snow and the temperature of man-made snow is right around freezing.” –Andrew Gardner, former Nordic skiing coach at Middlebury College and Nordic skiing PR professionalTravel“Well, I did try to acquire the URL www.timetravel.com, but the issuing organization would not sell it to me. No doubt because they know time travel is almost here and I would go back and create the Internet first! On a more serious note—the number of travelers, especially from Asia, is set to explode in volume. Destinations that do not take this seriously, starting now, will likely have significant problems with loss of both cultural authenticity and environment. In other words, those who plan for this volume now to spread it out, mitigate it, and control it will be the long-term winners. To do nothing is an active decision to have massive problems in 20 years.” –Shannon Stowell, President, The Adventure Travel Trade AssociationTechnology“Technology has already changed the ethos. Pure adventure will always be possible, especially with the absence of technology. But the combination of wireless communication and social media will continue to alter what the adventure finish line should look like. Some of it will be fantastic with real-time and enormous participation, but you can also count on some of it becoming utterly contrived and truly abhorrent. We will have to decide on what is real, genuine, and valued in our tribe—and what is not.” –Jordan CampbellGlobal Stewardship“The marriage of adventure with altruism will continue to play a more significant role in the 21st century. Giving back to underserved populations across the globe is part of a new moral imperative in the outdoor adventure space. It is no longer a sidebar activity for a dedicated few; rather it has become an end unto itself and part of the adventure space.” –Jordan Campbell, writer, filmmaker, and Marmot ambassador athleteSpirituality“I envision there will be a large resurgence back to nature similar to the Muir and Teddy Roosevelt era. Living in crowded environments with lives driven by electronics will create a strong desire for people across the country to go outside as a spiritual and health experience.” –Steve BarkerState of Mind“I still see adventure as a state of mind that constantly tugs at us to step into the unknown. That won’t change in the next 20 years. You either follow a script or you blaze your own trail.”–Jordan CampbellMy PredictionsSurfing the jet stream will normalize five-hour flights across the Atlantic. In January, a British Airways Boeing 777-200 made the New York to London route in five hours, 16 minutes, reaching ground speeds of up to 745 miles per hour by riding a powerful jet stream of up to 200 mile-per-hour tailwinds.Über Brands: With the recent unveiling of its “luxury hotels collection,” National Geographic is the latest publishing company that has taken branding to extreme heights: Fans can now view the world entirely through the National Geographic lens of magazines, books, websites, vacations, guides, and hotels. Hopefully Fox News will not be following suit.Two-Wheeled Transportation: Whether you prefer a 45-day, seven-country cycling trip from Paris to Moscow or sharing one of 66,500 public bicycles in Hangzhou, China, which has the largest bike-sharing system in the world, self-powered pedaling will change the way we get to work and see the world.The Bed-to-Bike-to-Work-to-Cocktails-to-Dinner-to-Bed Outfit: Natural and synthetic fabrics will be so sophisticated that they won’t wrinkle, smell from sweat, sag, or get dirty. And the blurred line between workout and work apparel will completely disappear.Lab-concocted, plant-protein-based performance meals will replace our favorite junk food.“Firsts” will become increasingly outrageous. Soon I’m expecting to see the first human summit of Mount Everest while simultaneously becoming the World Champion of Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter video game.Need a tan in January? A bigger wave to surf? Not to worry. Perhaps only in my mind, personal weather-providing drones, programmable from snowstorm to 75-degree bluebird sky day, will be as ubiquitous as smart phones.Life on a planet we never knew existed: NASA predicts that we are within 20 years of finding evidence of extraterrestrial life. Let’s hope they are friendly.The Language of Adventure: If politicians, corporations, and private citizens don’t all do their part in shoring up climate change, the term “adventure” will soon become synonymous with “survival.”–S.P.last_img read more

A Thru-Hiker’s Favorite Winter Gear

first_imgWhen the temperature dips below freezing, most of us hang up our backpacking gear and turn to more comfy pursuits, like Netflix marathons. Jack Schroeder, an A.T. thru-hiker and life-long backpacker sees the cold weather as an invitation for adventure. “Winter is my favorite time to go backpacking,” he says. “The views are often better, hiking in the snow is a blast, and I just like the cold air.”Schroeder teaches winter backpacking courses through Diamond Brand in Asheville. “People tell me about the coldest night they ever spent in the woods and how miserable it was. But if you have the right gear, you can stay warm and avoid shivering through the night.”Schroeder’s tip for staying warm on extra cold nights: “Heat water and fill your water bladder with it. Get in your sleeping bag and hug the water.”Here, Schroeder talks about the winter backpacking gear that has kept him warm, even when temperatures hit zero in the backcountry.Three-Layer SystemThis is my layering system that works for sleeping, hiking and just hanging out. I start with Ice Breaker Oasis long sleeve top and leggings, made from Merino wool ($90). The mid-layer is Patagonia’s R1 Fleece, full zip ($159), and on top of that I put the Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer. It’s the lightest weight full featured jacket I’ve found, with 800-fill down that’s only seven ounces and really packable. They’ve treated the down with DWR coating to help it shed water. It works. ($350)ghost-whisperer_fixKeen Saltzman ($130)Even in the winter, I like to keep it fast and light with a low-cut hiking boot. But waterproof upper is key. I used this boot on my thru-hike, and hiked over 2,200 miles without a blister.keen-saltzmanlow_fixWestern Mountaineering UltraLite ($485)You want a good bag and a good pad. Those are the two keys to staying warm at night. Not all bags perform the same, even if they have the same rating. This is a 20-degree bag, the highest quality of bag on the market, and it’s under two pounds. If you’re not worried about weight, go down to the 10-degree down bag.ultralite2016-side-openTherm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite ($129)A lot of people think they can get away with a cheap pad, but 60 percent of body heat escapes through the ground. This pad is really warm and weighs only 12 ounces for the full length.�Earl HarperMSR Hubba Hubba NX-2 ($399)It’s a two-person, double wall tent. You don’t need a true four-season single wall tent in the South. I’ve been through the worst weather in this tent and still came out dry. It even holds up well under snow pack. And it fits two people and their packs really well.©Earl HarperMerrell Capra IceWaterproof Hiking Boot ($130)Built for rugged, aggressive hikes, the Capra climbs like a mountain goat thanks to its grippy tread and lightweight, agile construction. The 4.5-mm lugs and Vibram Arctic Grip provide outstanding traction on snow and ice, and the breathable, waterproof construction keeps toes toasty without overheating.mrlm-j35799-121415-f16-032_fixSecur Products 5005 Waterproof Bluetooth Flashlight ($99)This LED flashlight, USB charger, and Bluetooth speaker is contained in one rugged waterproof device, powered by a lithium-ion battery that plays 28 hours of music and keeps the long nights of winter brightly illuminated.sp-5005_product_aMission Radiantactive Running Performance Midweight Gloves ($40)These dual-layer, carbon-infused fleece gloves retain 20% more heat and are touch-screen compatible. The gloves are flexible yet provide a secure grip. Perfect for trail running, the Mission gloves provide excellent warmth while still remaining lightweight, flexible, and pliant.51p5oaih34lAMPware Rechargeable Smartphone Case ($80)Solar charging isn’t always possible. Hand crank this case for five minutes, and you have an hour of normal use.ampwareOsprey SKARAB 24 ($100)A classic day pack, the Skarab is lightweight, versatile, and voluminous. The harness and hipbelt spread the load evenly, and front access panel means you never have to dig for anything buried at the bottom.1388047_601_mainlast_img read more

Beer Trails: Combining Scenery and Suds in the South

first_imgThe Southern Appalachians have their share of trails: bike trails, hiking trails, paddle trails—and now,  thanks to the craft brewery boom, beer trails. Explore multiple breweries and find quick access to the South’s best adventure. Here are six beer trails worthy of your precious weekends.Brew Ridge TrailVirginia—35 miles Nelson County is the epicenter of Virginia’s first craft beer boom, thanks to the pioneering efforts of Starr Hill, Blue Mountain and Devils Backbone. Brewing has grown in the county, and now you can link up almost half a dozen breweries via a scenic mountain ramble. The hiking isn’t too bad, either.South Street BreweryKick the trip off in downtown Charlottesville and order the easy drinking Satan’s Pony, a malt-driven amber ale. southstreetbrewery.comStarr HillPay homage to Virginia’s first craft brewery in Crozet. Starr Hill has revamped some of their classic beers and introduced outstanding new IPAs. Jump on their imperial IPA, King of Hop, which is loaded with citrus. starrhill.com Blue Mountain BreweryBlue Mountain helped pioneer the new wave of hop farming in Virginia, and you can see the fruits of their labor at their Afton brewery, which houses two expansive hop fields. Full Nelson is a solid pale, but try to get your hands on Blue Reserve, which uses only home-grown Cascade hops. bluemountainbrewery.com **Burn CaloriesDetour onto the Blue Ridge Parkway and climb Humpback Rocks, a fin of rock with killer views that come after 800 feet of climbing in one mile.Wild Wolf Brewing CompanyWild Wolf’s backyard is ridiculous—a white-fenced beer garden set amongst the hardwoods—and it’s the perfect road trip distraction. Order the Blonde Hunny, an unfiltered wheat beer, and bring your appetite—Wild Wolf runs a farm to fork restaurant that gets most of their ingredients within 30 miles. wildwolfbeer.com Devils Backbone Brewing CompanyDevils Backbone has grown significantly (they’re actually owned by Anheuser Busch now), but their Basecamp campus in Roseland still has adventure-hub charm. DB Brewing made a name for themselves with their Vienna Lager, and it’s still a solid option, but consider their Gold Leaf lager for something a bit more crisp and sessionable. dbbrewingcompany.comThe Beerwerks TrailVirginia—80 milesThe only problem with the Shenandoah Valley? There’s so much to take in, it can be hard to focus. You have the Shenandoah River running through the heart of the pastoral valley, which is framed by the rugged peaks of the George Washington and Jefferson National Forest, as well as Shenandoah National Park. You’ve got the A.T., the best mountain biking in Virginia, paddling, road cycling…and now beer. A dozen breweries are scattered along the valley’s new Beerwerks Trail. We’ve picked a few highlights to help you focus. beerwerkstrail.com Great Valley Farm BreweryGreat Valley Farm Brewery is a small farm brewery located on 27 acres in the Natural Bridge area. We specialize in producing beers in the Belgian farmhouse tradition using many ingredients from our farm, as well as other local farms. Please stop by to enjoy a beer and the scenic views of the southern Shenandoah Valley. http://greatvalleyfarmbrewery.com/Stable Craft BrewingYou have five breweries to choose from between Waynesboro and Staunton. We say hit Seven Arrows Brewing (sevenarrowsbrewing.com) on your way to Stable Craft, just outside of Waynesboro, which operates a working hop and horse farm on the site of the brewery. Get one of their IPAs and have it poured through their Randall, which infuses the beer with a different fruit or herb each day. stablecraftbrewing.com**Burn CaloriesHead into Shenandoah National Park and tackle the road climb on the southern end of Skyline Drive that gains more than 1,000 feet in 10 miles on its way to the top of Loft Mountain. nps.gov/shenHarrisonburg, VirginiaThis small college town has become a hotbed of beer, so prepare for a quick walking tour that takes in four breweries. Brothers Craft Brewing, on the north end of town, is in an old Coca-Cola plant (order their pale ale, called The Great Outdoors; brotherscraftbrewing.com). Then hit Restless Moons (get the Negative Externalities IPA if it’s on tap), Three Notch’d (Jack’s Java Espresso Stout for a kick; threenotchdbrewing.com) and finish at Pale Fire, where you’ll order the medal winning Salad Days Saison.**Burn CaloriesGet a trail pass from Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition and knock out a couple of dirty loops on Massanutten’s rugged Western Slope, just outside of downtown. svbcoalition.orgThe High Country Beer TrailNorth Carolina—40 milesYou could knock out every brewery on this High Country route in a day if you were ambitious, but you’d be missing the entire point of this trip. While the beer is good in the High Country, the adventure is better. Along this 40 mile trail that connects four breweries, you have either lift-served mountain biking or downhill skiing depending on the season, a legit peak scramble, some of the best road biking in the country, and even a bit of bouldering if you’re game.Blind Squirrel Brewing CompanyLocated in a lodge in sleepy Plumtree, Blind Squirrel has been knocking out solid beers quietly since 2012. Show up on Saturday and you can take a tour of the brewery. Order the Nut Brown Ale. Because it’s a squirrel brewery. Bonus: There’s a zipline course and disc golf course on site. blindsquirrelbrewery.comFlat Top BrewingMake a pit stop in Banner Elk for shuffleboard and a pint of Rollcast, a super crisp and refreshing Kolsch. flattopbrewing.com**Burn CaloriesHead to Grandfather Mountain State Park for a five-mile hike/rock scramble along the Grandfather Trail to Calloway Peak. Or knock out a 20+ mile road ride that combines a choice piece of the Blue Ridge Parkway (crossing the Lynn Cove Viaduct) and US 221.Lost Province BreweryGet an education in hops at this young brewery in downtown Boone by ordering the Lost Province IPA side by side with the Lost Province Mosaic IPA. You’ll see what the addition of specific hop strains can do for a beer. lostprovince.comAppalachian Mountain BreweryAMB might be on the outskirts of town, but it’s the center of craft brewing in the High Country. Order anything—it’s all good—but we’re partial to Long Leaf IPA. appalachianmountainbrewery.comBooneshine BrewingLess than a mile from AMB, Booneshine is a tiny brewery without its own taproom. You can watch the gang make beer through the window, then step next door to Basil’s for a sample at their bar. Get a flight, or go with the Sencha Saison, a Belgian farmhouse-style beer brewed with ginger and green tea. booneshine.beer**Burn CaloriesRocky Knob Mountain Bike Park, in Boone, has several miles of cross country trails built for progression so you can work on your tabletops, skinnies and drops. rockyknob.wordpress.comBlue Ridge Beerway—Virginia70 miles Roanoke is rapidly becoming Virginia’s hub of good beer, and Deschutes choosing the city for its East Coast expansion brewery helps solidify the city’s reputation. But there’s no need to wait until Deschutes opens its doors to enjoy the hop-bounty of the area. The new Blue Ridge Beerway connects five independent breweries operating in and around Star City.Sunken City Brewing CompanyNamed after the city that sits 300 feet below the surface of Smith Mountain Lake, Sunken City is a small, 25-barrel brewpub with a killer taproom and beer garden near the shore of the lake. Order the Dam Lager, a malt-driven amber lager. sunkencitybeer.com**Burn CaloriesPaddle a piece of Smith Mountain Lake’s 500 miles of shoreline. Bridgewater Marina has paddle boards ($60 a day; bwmarina.com).Chaos Mountain Brewing CompanyA rotating list of food trucks, live music and the occasional cornhole tournament makes Chaos Mountain a lively pit stop. You’re ordering the Squatch Ale, a malty Scotch ale with plenty of caramel goodness. chaosmountainbrewing.comSoaring Ridge Craft BrewersDowntown Roanoke’s first craft brewery has become a community center thanks to regular yoga classes, game nights and family fun days (with bounce houses and climbing walls!). Order the Virginia Creeper Pale Ale for the perfect balance of malty sweetness and hop bitterness. soaringridge.com Big Lick Brewing CompanyYou can walk from Soaring Ridge to Big Lick, a nano-brewery that manages to put out an impressively diverse lineup, many of which are named after local personalities. Try the Jack Taylor’s House Party, an amber ale named after a morning talk radio show host. biglickbrewingco.com**Burn CaloriesExplore Park, on the edge of downtown, offers 1,100-acres and 14 miles of mountain biking and trail running (explorepark.org). Or head to Mill Mountain for a mix of greenways and purpose-built singletrack overlooking downtown (playroanoke.com).Flying Mouse BreweryHead out of town and into the mountains for the Flying Mouse, a brewery that’s within walking distance of the Appalachian Trail and directly on the TransAmerica 76 Bicycle Route. With the tagline “Life’s an adventure, drink accordingly,” I think you should order a flight and see which of the four flagship beers you like best. flyingmousebrewery.com**Burn CaloriesHead straight for the A.T.’s McAfee Knob, and the best Instagram post of your week is nearby.Brewly Noted Beer TrailTennessee + Virginia, 48 miles While Tennessee was a bit slow to the craft beer game, the state has been catching up at breakneck speeds, particularly in East Tennessee, where the Tri-Cities of Johnson City, Kingsport and Bristol have become a beer hub. The Brewly Noted Beer Trail links several craft breweries together while passing some of East Tennessee’s most underrated hiking and mountain biking.Johnson City Brewing CompanyStart in the very hip downtown of Johnson City. With a little luck, you’ll have the chance to try JCBC’s Community Brew, which uses hops gathered from customers. johnsoncitybrewing.comYee-Haw Brewing CompanyHit Yee-Haw, in the renovated Tweetsie Train Depot, for an Eighty Shilling Scottish Ale, which is all malty goodness in a sessionable 5% ABV. yeehawbrewing.com**Burn CaloriesHead south of town and climb a three-mile loop on Buffalo Mountain, which includes the White Rock Trail, where mountaintop cliff outcroppings provide big views to the east.Sleepy Owl BreweryCruise through downtown Kingsport for a stop at Sleepy Owl, which got its start through a successful Kickstarter campaign. You’ll find a bunch of different IPAs on tap, but go with the slightly sweet Honey Ale if it’s available. sleepyowlbrewery.com**Burn CaloriesExplore an eight-mile loop in Warriors’ Path State Park, where singletrack cruises along the shores of Fort Patrick Henry Lake. Watch for the rocky downhill on Boneyard.Bristol, Tennessee/ VirginiaYou’re gonna stroll into Virginia on this two-stop walking tour of small town beer. Grab a Mex-I-Can Backfire, an easy drinking Mexican-style lager, at Studio Brew. And buy your designated driver one of Studio’s homemade Big E’Z’ Root Beers (studiobrew.beer). Wander over to the one-year-old Bristol Brewing, in the historic bus station, and order the Red Neck Amber. Because it’s called “Red Neck Amber.”LoCo Ale TrailVirginia—30 miles (by bike)Loudoun County is best known as Virginia’s wine country, but the area now has 17 breweries churning out beer in the midst of rolling farms. While it might be tempting (and a bit dangerous) to hit all 17 breweries in a single trip, we recommend you focus your efforts by grabbing a bike and knocking out a handful of breweries along the Washington and Old Dominion Trail, which runs from D.C. to Purcellville. A 30-mile one-way ride on the trail will run you by half a dozen breweries. Here are the highlights.Beltway Brewing CompanyBeltway was built to be a contract brewery, producing beers for breweries all over the region. Their small taproom is a showcase for the beers brewed on the premises, so you never know what you’ll get, but the diversity is usually impressive. beltwaybrewco.com Old Ox BreweryLocated at mile 25 on the W&OD, Old Ox is a cyclist’s retreat known for impromptu cornhole tournaments. Order the Black Ox, a rye porter that balances the roast character of the porter with the spice of the rye-heavy malt bill. oldoxbrewery.com Leesburg, VirginiaYou can knock out two breweries within a couple of blocks of each other at the halfway point. Crooked Run is a low-key nano-brewery with five rotating taps. Look for their Jake o’ Lantern, a spiced butternut squash ale, in the fall (crookedrunbrewing.com). Stroll over to Loudon Brewing Company for a pint of their flagship Loud and Brewing, which is all about the Cascade and Chinook hops (loudonbrewing.com), on their shady deck.Belly Love BrewingOn Purcellville’s Main Street, and near the end of the W&OD, Belly Love has a fairly swanky taproom with solid pub fare. Order the Narcissist, a malt-forward but still crisp lager (bellylovebrewing.com). Bonus: If you still have legs, you can tack on two more breweries in Purcellville—Corcoran Brewing and Adroit Theory.last_img read more

Five Traffickers Die in Clash with Police in Rio de Janeiro

first_imgBy Dialogo April 15, 2011 An operation by the Special Operations Battalion (BOPE) in two slums in northern Rio de Janeiro on 13 April left five dead, believed to be drug traffickers, a Military Police spokesperson informed AFP. The operation to suppress drug trafficking and weapons trafficking in the slums of Manguinhos and Mandela mobilized one hundred police officers, supported by two armored vehicles. Three pistols, two grenades, twenty-three motorcycles, and chemical substances for manufacturing drugs were confiscated, the police specified, and four arrests were made. Elsewhere, in western Rio, the Civil Police carried out an operation on 13 April to dismantle a police-style militia suspected of operating in thirteen slums. A city councilor was arrested, and fourteen arrest warrants were issued by the judicial authorities. The expansion of militias in Rio de Janeiro goes back to 2006, when groups of active or retired police officers invaded several favelas in the western part of the city, expelled drug traffickers, and started to collect “security fees” from inhabitants. Militias are present in 105 of the city’s 250 major slums, according to a report by Paulo Storani, a former captain of the elite Special Operations Unit (BOPE) of the Military Police. The authorities of Rio de Janeiro state, one of the country’s most violent, began a countercampaign in 2008 to pacify the city and eliminate militias and drug traffickers from the slums, ahead of hosting the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016. At present, around twenty slums have been pacified.last_img read more