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A package of tourism laws was on the agenda of today’s session of the Parliament

first_imgA package of tourist laws was also on the agenda of today’s session of the Parliament.The most important among them is certainly the proposal Of the Law on Tourist Boards and the Promotion of Croatian Tourism, which needs to be revised not only to implement the measures set out in the Tourism Development Strategy for the period until 2020, but also to increase its overall efficiency, especially at regional and local level, all to ensure preconditions for systematic implementation of destination management.The most important changes in the proposal of the mentioned law concern the establishment of the system of tourist boards according to the model of destination management organizations, in the sense that the tourist system is reorganized through merging and rationalization within the system with the application of the principle of financial self-sufficiency. For several units of local or regional self-government through the allocation of financial resources. Also, the tasks of tourist boards are redefined while respecting the principle of self-sufficiency, in such a way that the tasks of the local tourist board are defined exclusively as operational. , while the tasks of the regional tourist community are focused on operational activities, but with certain strategic elements through four basic groups of tasks: strategic planning and development, tourism system management, information and research, and marketing. The tasks of the CNTB, as a national tourism organization, are primarily focused on marketing and promoting tourism at the national level. Among the important changes contained in the draft law is the amendment limiting the share of members in the assembly to local tourist boards to 30% (instead of 40% so far), all in order to prevent individual entities from having the upper hand in decision-making.Proposal Law on membership fees in tourist boards contains novelties that will simplify the membership fee calculation process, and due to administrative relief and reduction of business costs create a better business environment. In particular, tourist classes are abolished, and consequently membership fee rates will not be determined depending on the tourist class. for the calculation of the membership fee from the current 28 to 5, the obligation to pay the membership fee is deleted for a part of the taxpayer, while the scope of payment of the same is reduced for a part of the taxpayer. Banks are also obliged to pay membership fees. Legal and natural persons operating in assisted areas (groups I-IV) will pay a membership fee reduced by 20%. It is also proposed a different distribution of tourist membership fees in such a way that regional tourist boards instead of the current 10% of the mentioned source of income will receive 15%, while the CNTB will receive 25% instead of the previous 20%. It is anticipated that these measures will relieve the economy of around HRK 11 million annually.Basic changes in the proposal Of the Tourist Tax Act relate to the decentralization of decision-making on the amount of tourist tax. Specifically, the amount of the tourist tax would no longer be determined by the Government of the Republic of Croatia, but by the county assemblies, ie the City Assembly of the City of Zagreb, while the Minister of Tourism would regulate only the minimum and maximum amount of the tourist tax. Among the most important innovations are those concerning the different distribution of tourist tax funds, so that regional tourist boards would receive 10% instead of the current 15%, while the CNTB would receive 25% of the total amount of the tax instead of the current 20%.You can see the whole presentation and discussion below in the attachment.In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”last_img read more

European Commission to push ahead with revised IORP Directive

first_imgIn the draft work programme’s preamble, the Commission noted that the European Fund for Strategic Investments would only form part of the €300bn investment programme, with the use of “innovative” financial instruments key.It also identified the completion of the “significant overhaul” of financial regulation in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis as a major area of its work.“The financial regulatory framework,” it added, “will be further strengthened by a proposal dealing with crisis management and resolution of non-bank systemic entities.”Jonathan Hill, commissioner for financial services, previously told a parliamentary hearing he would like to publish a proposal tackling the risk of clearing house bankruptcy early next year.The draft further identified 80 proposals that would either be withdrawn or modified, many of which are directives and regulation that have stalled due to lack of support from member states.Despite being listed as “under review” in a November letter from Juncker and Commission vice-president Frans Timmermans, the IORP Directive was not among the 80 proposals to be abandoned or substantially modified.Hill told journalists in Brussels earlier this week it would be “odd” to withdraw the revised IORP Directive now, when the Council of the EU had, under the Italian presidency, agreed a number of changes over the course of four compromise drafts.The Council most recently finalised its negotiating mandate with the European Parliament, although no MEP has been appointed as rapporteur to oversee its passage through the chamber. Dave Roberts, senior consultant at Towers Watson in the UK, noted that the withdrawal of the revised IORP Directive so soon after Michel Barnier published it risked being perceived as “openly critical” of the former commissioner’s work.Roberts also noted the problems that could have arisen due to the commissioners currently involved.“Given that Mr Timmermans is Dutch and that the Commissioner now in charge of IORP II, Jonathan Hill, is from the UK, withdrawing the Directive could lead to accusations of national bias – with the Netherlands and UK leading antagonists of IORP II,” he said. The European Commission is set to push ahead with the revised IORP Directive, with the legislation not among the dozens of proposals earmarked for withdrawal in a draft of the executive’s work programme.The 2015 Work Programme, set to be published on 16 December, outlines president Jean-Claude Juncker’s priorities for the coming year and highlights the launch of the Commission’s €300bn investment plan, among other measures to stimulate growth.The undated draft of the work programme seen by IPE is likely to have been circulated at a meeting of Commission vice-presidents earlier this week.It listed the action plan on the Capital Markets Union and a framework to wind up systemically important financial institutions, such as clearing houses, as two of the new measures the Commission would prioritise in 2015.last_img read more

Asset management costs ‘to drop by 10%’: survey

first_imgGwynne pointed out that the pressure on fees was in part due to clients and supervisors becoming increasingly cost-aware, “as costs have become an important selection criterion”.In his opinion, another explanation for declining costs was that many clients had opted for low-cost alternatives, such as ETFs and factor investment. He estimated that 40% of the reduction could be explained by this phenomenon.The survey suggested that asset managers dealt with the development by accepting a drop in their profits margin, but also cut costs through their back office. This meant that cost-saving came at the expense of investment in IT systems, which the survey said were necessary to remain competitive. In addition, declining income could lead to mergers and takeovers, the two companies said.The researchers said they expected clients would increasingly opt for extremely low-cost investments in combination with higher-cost active investments.“Through investing a large proportion of assets in ETFs with near-zero costs, they could free up assets for active funds which considerably deviate from the benchmark, or funds that invest in illiquid markets,” the report said.Recently, Saker Nusseibeh, chief executive of Hermes Investment Management, also predicted declining margins at asset managers.During a Morningstar conference, he said that asset managers’ margins of between 35% and 45% were “untenably high”. Asset management costs are to drop by approximately 10% in the next three years, a survey by management consultancy Oliver Wyman and asset manager Morgan Stanley has suggested.In their report, The World Upside Down, the two firms attributed the decline to reduced fees as well as a shift towards exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and factor investment.“The decrease of fees is a trend – last year they dropped 6%,” said Serge Gwynne, partner at Oliver Wyman’s corporate and institutional banking practice.He added that the fall was insufficiently compensated by a rise in assets under management, which had lead to an income drop of roughly 5% at asset managers.last_img read more

Defense Asking For Lighter Sentence In Boguslawski Case

first_imgAndrew Boguslawski, admitted to explosive charges in Ohio.An attorney for a Moores Hill man who pleaded guilty to having explosive devices in his car in Ohio is asking for a lighter sentence.Andrew Boguslawski was arrested after he was stopped for speeding by an Ohio state trooper on I-70 on New Year’s Day.Prosecutors said he had nine unregistered bombs in his car and four devices that be converted into explosives.He admitted to the charges earlier this year and now his lawyer is seeking a reduced sentence.Defense attorney Steve Nolder is asking for credit for time served in the county jail followed by 18 months of house arrest. Nolder said his defendant is not a future threat to society and the sentence would ensure he is rehabilitated.Boguslawski could be sentenced up to 10 years in prison and receive a $250,000 fine. The hearing is scheduled for Aug. 8 in federal court in Columbus.last_img read more

M/gladbach fans to be ‘absent and present’ against Leverkusen

first_img Loading… Promoted Content6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Top 9 Oddest Underwater Discoveries No One Can Explain7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value8 Things That Will Happen If An Asteroid Hits EarthA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her Grandson9 Great Actors Who Will Always Be Defined By One RoleWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year “We’re arranging close to 13,000 cut-outs, but almost 20,000 have been ordered already,” Thomas Ludwig, head of the supporters’ group, told AFP subsidiary SID. “It’s a nice operation, which creates an atmosphere in the stadium,” said Gladbach sporting director Max Eberl. “Even if at the same time it’s a reminder that football without supporters is not the same.” “It’s fantastic. We really have the impression that we’re not alone when we’re training in the stadium,” added Gladbach coach Marco Rose. Bayern Munich beat Anthony Ujah;s Union Berlin 2-0 last Sunday Gladbach are third in the table and six points behind leaders Bayern Munich. They won 3-1 at Eintracht Frankfurt last weekend as the Bundesliga returned following a two-month interruption. Read AlsoBundesliga Players To Wear Black Armbands For Covid-19 Victims prior to Saturday’s march Nigeria international Anthony Ujah and his Union Berlin teammates will be hoping to earn their first re-start victory as they file out against Hertha BSC away on Friday. Ujah was in action for 71 minutes as they lost 2-0 to table toppers Bayern Munich last Sunday. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img The saying that necessity is the mother of invention will come to to fore on Saturday Borussia Moenchengladbach host Bayer leverkusen in the up and running German Bundesliga. With matches slated to be placed behind closed doors the club fans will be absent and present in a special way. Nearly 13,000 cardboard cut-outs of Borussia Moenchengladbach supporters are set to welcome the team. Gladbach hosted the first Bundesliga game ever played without fans on March 11, shortly before the German season was put on hold because of the coronavirus outbreak. One of the club’s supporters’ groups, “Fanprojekt Moenchengladbach”, subsequently came up with the idea of allowing fans to print life-sized images of themselves to be placed inside the ground. The cut-outs line the stadium’s otherwise empty stands, with season ticket holders able to have their cardboard lookalike allocated to their regular spot.last_img read more

Real Madrid aiming for 30% stadium reopening in October

first_imgHowever, with restrictions set relax when the 2020-21 campaign begins in September, stadiums across the country could allow a percentage of fans to return. With La Liga suspended since March, the Spanish giants have brought forward the scheduled redevelopment of their 81,004 seater home ground. The project has progressed rapidly in recent weeks, with Los Blancos now confident of a partial reopening later in the year, according to reports from Marca. Read Also: La Liga: Messi on fire as Barca step up preparations for restart With the Santiago Bernabeu out of action this summer, Real Madrid will complete the season at the Estadio Alfredo Di Stefano. The 6,000 capacity stadium is based at the club’s training complex in Valdebebas in the north east of Madrid. Current public health guidelines surrounding coronavirus mean all remaining league games in 2019-20 will be played behind closed doors, as the season resumes on June 11.Advertisementcenter_img Real Madrid will push ahead with ambitious plans to allow 30% of their fans to return to the renovated Estadio Santiago Bernabeu by October. Loading…last_img read more

Benton County duel goes to Cordes

first_imgBy Jerry Mackey  Plenty of excitement was witnessed by the fans in the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock feature. When the checkers flew it was Brett Vanous making his way to victory lane following a spirited battle with second place finisher Nathan Ballard.  Troy Cordes was the Sunday IMCA Modified feature winner at Benton County Speedway. (Photo by Jim Wittke) Outside front row starter Tony Olson put on a dominating performance in winning the Karl Kus­toms Northern SportMod main. Olson ran the extreme high side the entire race in leading flag to flag. Dylan VanWyk made the bottom work well but not good enough to get by Olson in settling for second.  The IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature belonged to Shawn Ritter. He ran the extreme low line the entire race and held back Damon Murty in getting to the checkers first.center_img VINTON, Iowa (June 14) – Sunday’s IMCA Modified 20-lap feature saw long-time Benton County Speedway racer Troy Cordes outduel Dylan Thornton from California for the win.  Nearly 100 race car drivers packed the pit area. The Specialty Promotions group provided an­other excellent race track that provided plenty of side by side racing in all divisions. The two traded the lead several times before Cordes was able to take control late in the race. Thornton ran a close second ahead of last week’s winner Tom Berry Jr. last_img read more

Verbal commit Ellison looks to add versatility, depth to Syracuse secondary

first_img Published on October 28, 2014 at 12:06 am Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Scout.com, ESPN, Rivals and Hudl all list Daivon Ellison as a cornerback.But the Don Bosco Preparatory (New Jersey) High School senior doesn’t define himself as the recruiting websites do.The reason Syracuse recruited him, he says, is because he can basically play any position.“I’m not just a corner,” he said.And it’s Ellison’s ability to play safety and corner that can only help a Syracuse secondary that has struggled with its depth in the last couple of seasons. He is the most recent commit to SU’s Class of 2015 after verbally committing on Aug. 25 and will have a lot of competition to see the field right away.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAlso part of the class are cornerbacks Gerald Robinson and Andrew Spence, along with three more safeties — and Ellison’s versatility could give him an edge as the Orange secondary continues to evolve.“He really is flying around everywhere on the field, all different types of positions,” DBP defensive tackle Kevin Feder said. “He’s a huge game-changer having him in the game. It helps out every which way.”Injuries — along with freshman safety Naesean Howard leaving the team earlier this season — have struck the Syracuse secondary multiple times in the past two years. This season, third cornerback Wayne Morgan has battled a lower-body injury and it was announced by SU Athletics on Monday that freshman safety Rodney Williams will miss the rest of the season with a lower-body injury.Last year, safety Durell Eskridge and cornerback Julian Whigham both had season-ending injuries. And with Eskridge eligible for the NFL draft at the end of the season and Brandon Reddish graduating, there will be opportunities for the current crop of freshmen and the incoming defensive backs to contribute.“But the key thing is that can they line up and play our base package?” said SU defensive backs coach Fred Reed during training camp of how he develops young players. “If they can line up and play our base package, then we got a chance to get them out there and be able to perform.“We try and teach them our base system and not put too much on their plates. That’s how we approach it.”Ellison started out as an outside linebacker his freshman year, before eventually transitioning to cornerback his sophomore year. As a junior, he split time at both, but has focused the majority of his time at cornerback his senior year at Don Bosco.He also moonlights as a wide receiver and running back, playing 5–10 plays per game on offense and also contributing as the team’s top kick returner on special teams.Ellison is always the guy talking with coaches so that he could have both the offensive and defensive playbook memorized.“During the offseason he just trains to get his stamina up, because he’s going to be on the field most of the time,” said Wes McKoy, Don Bosco’s quarterback.Ellison said there are pros and cons to playing both cornerback and safety. As a corner, he said he loves being on that island and shutting down a wideout one-on-one. But he also resents the fact that he can’t be a game-changer at cornerback if the opposing team runs plays away from him.At safety, he feels like the leader of the defense. He likes being in the middle of the field, coming up on the runs and shutting down the deep passes.At Syracuse, he could zero in on one or play either position — a luxury the Orange can only benefit from.Said Ellison: “As of right now, I’m roaming around the defensive backs.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

The USC men’s water polo team will be all business at Weekender

first_imgAs droves of students begin to migrate north for the weekend football game against Cal, so will the No. 3 USC men’s water polo team.The Trojans take to the road to face No. 4 Cal and No. 16 Pacific in their second consecutive two-game weekend, a week after capping an undefeated homestand that featured No. 8 Pepperdine and Long Beach City College. The Trojans are 9-1 this season and undefeated in conference play.“We’ve had our ups and downs. We’re not all the way to where we want to be, but there is progress,” said senior two-meter Shea Buckner. “We want to go to NCAA Championships.”The Trojans’ matchup with Cal on Saturday looks to live up to the two teams’ storied rivalry, as both of the schools enter the weekend ranked in the top five nationally. In the past three years, the teams have met twice in the NCAA Championship, with the Bears coming out victorious both times. This includes a win in 2006 that was decided by a single goal scored in the final second of the game. The Trojans were 2-0 against the Bears in 2008, and won each of the closely contested games in the final minutes en route to an undefeated 29-0 championship season.Buckner, who transferred from Cal to USC after his freshman year, knows what to expect from a strong Golden Bear attack.“They’ve got good leadership. They’re really fast and great on the counter-attack,” Buckner said. “They play with a lot of energy and physicality.”USC already faced off against Cal once this season when the teams met in the third place game of the NorCal Tournament in Palo Alto, Calif. The Trojans bested the Bears 8-6, in a game that featured eight different Trojan players scoring goals.Pacific, who faces USC on Sunday in Stockton, Calif., has not had nearly as much success against the Trojans as Cal, having lost the last eight games played between the two teams. The Trojans were 2-0 against Pacific in 2008 and averaged a seven-goal margin of victory in the two wins. USC has a 35-7 all-time record against Pacific, and their .833 winning percentage over the Tigers is the third-highest out of all the opponents the Trojans face in 2009.“Pacific isn’t an easy team either. Cal is obviously the focus, but you have to be ready for the game against Pacific at their home,” Buckner said.Senior driver Justin Rappel leads the Trojans with 16 goals scored, while fellow senior driver Matt Sagehorn follows closely behind with 14. USC’s veterans continue to dominate offensively, as five of the Trojan’s top six scorers are seniors.Sophomore goalie Joel Dennerley, who recorded eight saves in the Pepperdine match last weekend, now has 60 saves this season, and is averaging less than four goals allowed per game so far in 2009. He continues to anchor a powerful Trojan defense that has not surrendered more than eight goals in any game this season.“Our goal is to never give up more than four goals a game,” Buckner said. “We’re always well prepared and we know our system. As long as we stick to it, we do a good job.”last_img read more

After the ‘Thrill’ is gone from the pages

first_imgWhen I first took this column two and a half years ago, I envisioned saying goodbye in a three-part series.The first would be a detailed look at the birth of the column. Part two would be a retelling of its life.Part three would be an in-depth look at its title, “Thrilla on Manilla Paper.” After all, you deserve to know what in the world could possibly have led to such a name. And before this is all over, you might still get that explanation.But instead of a three column series, it is just this one.I thought, two and a half years ago, by the time it was all said and done, I’d need thousands of words to sum everything up. Instead, it’s just a few hundred on this piece of paper.In fact, one sentence might do the trick. So here it goes.What a long, strange trip it’s been.It’s a journey that has truly traversed this campus and country.It has gone from the steps of Heritage Hall to the gates of Dedeaux Field, from press row at Galen Center to the tallest heights of the Coliseum.It’s a trip that’s taken me from Los Angeles to the top of a hill in Berkeley; from the cozy confines of South Bend, Ind., to the open air of Seattle, Wash.It’s taken me from a stadium that seats 100,000 people in Columbus, Ohio, to a stadium that sounds like it seats 100,000 people in Eugene, Ore.Simply being there has been remarkable and being able to share it with you through my lens has been just as great.But simply being there is not the story. No, this column would be far more boring if it were just a retelling of the places I’ve been.Postcards are for brief hellos and goodbyes. Columns are not. Columns are a place for opinion and analysis — a look at what has occurred along that journey.But again, this would just be a space filled with words if there were no characters. So I owe it to all the men and women who have graced these pages along the way, who have made the stories what they were — and given me the ability to write what I’ve written.There was Pete Carroll, who over the last four years was one of the most quotable people on the planet.He reveled in every win, and was quick to point out who deserved praise, wallowed in each loss and never hesitated to point the finger at himself.Without Carroll, this would just been stories about a football team. Instead, wins and losses took on a life of their own, with Carroll’s commentary as an integral part of their interpretations one way or another.There was Joe McKnight, whose tenure at USC was a tumultuous one, filled with great promise and flashes of brilliance as well as great disappointment.Without McKnight, this would have been a football team with a lot of running backs. Instead, it was a football team with a bevy of backs, one of which could have been legendary.There was Tim Floyd, Taj Gibson, Dwight Lewis, Daniel Hackett, O.J. Mayo and DeMar Derozan. All six were central figures in the meteoric rise of USC basketball and key players in its sudden fall.There is Jovan Vavic, the candid and quotable head coach of USC’s top-ranked water polo teams. He reached the pinnacle of the sport but found obstacles in his attempt to repeat — that was, until he got over the hump.But again, it would just be a story if not for Vavic’s passion and intensity. He spoke his mind and wore his emotions on his sleeve, making for more than just some article about a few games in a pool.There have been dozens of other names that have crossed these pages, each with a story to tell and each with the unique ability to make a story more than just words.Really, all I’ve done over the last two and a half years is mix their words and actions with my opinions. What you have as the end result is a column.Whether you’ve agreed with me or not is not important. It’s whether you’ve taken the time to agree with me or not that’s more important.If you have, thank you. I hope you’ve been able to take something away from this.The inches left in this paper are running low, so before I say goodbye for good, let me explain one last thing: my column’s name.I wanted to name it “From the Parking Lot,” in reference to a shot by former Vermont basketball player T.J. Sorrentine. He hit a deep three late in a first round game against Syracuse in 2005, securing an upset for the No. 13 Catamounts. The shot was from way behind the arc, prompting Gus Johnson to say: “Sorrentine hit that one from the parking lot.”But the Daily Trojan’s sports editor at the time, Peter Simones, said the reference was too obscure. Instead, after brainstorming, a title playing off one of the greatest boxing matches of all time was chosen.Clever, I know.Anyway, now that the name situation has been settled, that time is drawing near. It’s the time where this column comes to an end.But before it’s knocked out for good, I want to leave you with a quote from General MacArthur. He said, “Old columnists never die, they just fade away.”Actually, I don’t think that’s what he said. But it’s too late now. There’s no space left to talk about it, no columns left to write.“Thrilla on Manilla Paper” ran every other Friday. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Grant at tunkel@usc.edu.last_img read more