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Big nests lure the ‘kidults’

first_imgManoj & Madhuri built their home with Ownit Homes, with the focus on creating enough space so their daughters could stay at home as long as possible.They are often labelled “kidults” or “boomerang kids” – adult children who still live at home.But not all parents are so keen for their grown-up offspring to fly the nest.Manoj and Madhuri Vemula are bucking that “grow up and leave” mentality, and have moved in to their new, purpose-built home at Highvale in the Samford Valley.Constructed by Brisbane-based Ownit Homes, the six-bedroom house was designed to allow their two daughters, Mousami, 27, and Mounavi, 22, to stay under their wing as long as possible.“We want our girls to stay as long as they need to,” Ms Vemula, who works in the industrial relations sector, said.“In our culture (Indian), it is common for several generations to live under one roof.”The family recently made the move in to their dream home, leaving behind a four-bedroom house on a small block at Taigum.Their new home has six bedrooms, each with an ensuite, a large entertaining area and media room, a granny flat and two acres of land.Its completion marked the culmination of years of hard work, after the family moved from India 15 years ago in pursuit of the great Australian dream.“We saw Australia as offering so many more opportunities. This is our dream come true,” Mrs Vemula said.“The girls were growing up (Mousami, who works in human resources, recently married, and Mounavi is a doctor) and with real estate the way it is, we wanted to give them the best opportunity to succeed when they do move out.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours ago“I would have them at home forever if I could, and I would welcome any future grandchildren here.“It’s not unusual in our culture to have several generations under the same roof.“I lived with three generations. We look after each other.”But no one gets a “free ride” in the Vemula home. Rent and bills are paid, and chores are shared.Ownit Homes managing director Brad Ganim said his company was seeing an increase in people wanting an extra bedroom or space away from the main living areas.“Grandparents or extended family can live there or it can be used as a teen getaway,” he said.“People are recognising that the kids may be around longer and are building accordingly. We’ve seen it grow in popularity over the past few years.”In October last year, Bold Living director Brett Boulton said the modern family had come full circle, with many grandparents now sharing a home with their children and grandchildren.“This new-age family co-living is making housing more affordable for the younger generation and is attractive to grandparents who get to spend more time with their kids and grandkids and have room to park the caravan when they’re not travelling,” he said at the time.last_img read more

Verbal commit Ellison looks to add versatility, depth to Syracuse secondary

first_img Published on October 28, 2014 at 12:06 am Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Scout.com, ESPN, Rivals and Hudl all list Daivon Ellison as a cornerback.But the Don Bosco Preparatory (New Jersey) High School senior doesn’t define himself as the recruiting websites do.The reason Syracuse recruited him, he says, is because he can basically play any position.“I’m not just a corner,” he said.And it’s Ellison’s ability to play safety and corner that can only help a Syracuse secondary that has struggled with its depth in the last couple of seasons. He is the most recent commit to SU’s Class of 2015 after verbally committing on Aug. 25 and will have a lot of competition to see the field right away.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAlso part of the class are cornerbacks Gerald Robinson and Andrew Spence, along with three more safeties — and Ellison’s versatility could give him an edge as the Orange secondary continues to evolve.“He really is flying around everywhere on the field, all different types of positions,” DBP defensive tackle Kevin Feder said. “He’s a huge game-changer having him in the game. It helps out every which way.”Injuries — along with freshman safety Naesean Howard leaving the team earlier this season — have struck the Syracuse secondary multiple times in the past two years. This season, third cornerback Wayne Morgan has battled a lower-body injury and it was announced by SU Athletics on Monday that freshman safety Rodney Williams will miss the rest of the season with a lower-body injury.Last year, safety Durell Eskridge and cornerback Julian Whigham both had season-ending injuries. And with Eskridge eligible for the NFL draft at the end of the season and Brandon Reddish graduating, there will be opportunities for the current crop of freshmen and the incoming defensive backs to contribute.“But the key thing is that can they line up and play our base package?” said SU defensive backs coach Fred Reed during training camp of how he develops young players. “If they can line up and play our base package, then we got a chance to get them out there and be able to perform.“We try and teach them our base system and not put too much on their plates. That’s how we approach it.”Ellison started out as an outside linebacker his freshman year, before eventually transitioning to cornerback his sophomore year. As a junior, he split time at both, but has focused the majority of his time at cornerback his senior year at Don Bosco.He also moonlights as a wide receiver and running back, playing 5–10 plays per game on offense and also contributing as the team’s top kick returner on special teams.Ellison is always the guy talking with coaches so that he could have both the offensive and defensive playbook memorized.“During the offseason he just trains to get his stamina up, because he’s going to be on the field most of the time,” said Wes McKoy, Don Bosco’s quarterback.Ellison said there are pros and cons to playing both cornerback and safety. As a corner, he said he loves being on that island and shutting down a wideout one-on-one. But he also resents the fact that he can’t be a game-changer at cornerback if the opposing team runs plays away from him.At safety, he feels like the leader of the defense. He likes being in the middle of the field, coming up on the runs and shutting down the deep passes.At Syracuse, he could zero in on one or play either position — a luxury the Orange can only benefit from.Said Ellison: “As of right now, I’m roaming around the defensive backs.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more