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Half of COVID patients in Irish study suffer ongoing fatigue

first_img‘Long COVID’ The study, which is being presented at the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID) later this month, suggested those affected are “worthy of further study and early intervention”. As the pandemic has scorched its way across the planet, most attention has been focused on the immediate impact, measured by hospital admissions and deaths.But it has become increasingly clear that the virus can reverberate long after a patient has “recovered”. Online support groups across the world have attracted thousands of members looking for help and advice about ongoing illness.In July, a study of recovered hospital patients in Italy found that 87 percent were still suffering at least one symptom 60 days after falling ill. Fatigue and breathing difficulties were the most common.Researchers from King’s College London, which is behind a large-scale symptom-tracking project, estimate that one in 10 people using the app still have symptoms after 30 days and some remain unwell for months.”We are increasingly seeing evidence of ‘long COVID’, and fatigue is one of the commonly reported side effects. This study highlights that fatigue was experienced in both hospitalized patients and in those with milder initial presentations,” said Michael Head, of the University of Southampton, commenting on the latest research. “The emerging extent of long COVID is why it is important to reduce community transmission, even among younger groups of people who are not immediately seriously ill.” More than half of patients and staff with COVID-19 monitored by an Irish hospital suffered persistent fatigue in the aftermath of the initial disease, according to a new study Friday highlighting the “significant burden” of lingering symptoms.It comes as patient groups and doctors call for more research into the medium- and long-term effects of the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, which has sickened more than 30 million people across the world and killed at least 943,000.”Whilst the presenting features of SARS-CoV-2 infection have been well-characterized, the medium- and long-term consequences of infection remain unexplored,” said Liam Townsend, of St James’s Hospital and Trinity Translational Medicine Institute at Trinity College Dublin.  The study, which tracked 128 participants at St James’s Hospital, found that 52 percent reported persistent fatigue when they were assessed an average of 10 weeks after “clinical recovery” from infection, regardless of how serious their initial infection was.The preliminary study, which has not yet been peer reviewed, included 71 people who had been admitted to hospital and 57 employees of the hospital who had mild illness. The average age was 50 and all participants had tested positive for COVID-19.Researchers looked at a variety of potential factors, including the severity of the initial illness and pre-existing conditions, including depression.They found that it made no difference whether a patient had been hospitalized or not. However, they did find that women, despite making up just over half of the participants (54 percent), accounted for two-thirds of those with persistent fatigue (67 percent). Those with a previous history of anxiety or depression were also found to be more likely to have fatigue.The authors said the findings showed that more work was needed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on patients in the longer term. “Our findings demonstrate a significant burden of post-viral fatigue in individuals with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection after the acute phase of COVID-19 illness,” they concluded.  Topics :last_img read more

Kyrillos Opts Out for U.S. Senate

first_imgBy John BurtonThe lineup is set for the Aug. 13 special primary to replace the late U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg with four high-profile Democrats in the running. The list is leaner on the Republican side. It’s a race that one Two-River state senator opted to sit out.State Sen. Joseph M. Kyrillos, Middletown, a more than two-decade Republican veteran of the Senate and longtime party standard-bearer, was on just about everyone’s short list of either being chosen by Republican Gov. Chris Christie to hold the U.S. Senate seat for the interim, and/or to seek the office for the remaining 13 months of Lautenberg’s term.The only Monmouth County candidate for the seat is U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone Jr., Long Branch, a 25-year Democratic veteran of the House who represents the 6th District.Kyrillos, 53, has opted out of running and this week discussed his decision with The Two River Times™.“I just ran my race and had an election about seven months ago,” Kyrillos said of being his party’s unsuccessful candidate against Sen. Robert Menendez, D-NJ. “It was great, I enjoyed every minute of it,” he said while acknowledging he ran into some insurmountable obstacles, which really made his 2012 run – always a long shot – that much more arduous.While deciding whether to run in 2011, he said, he “assumed three things. I assumed the national election would be a close one,” with Mitt Romney’s run for president offering some coattails. That however, turned out to not be the case with President Barack Obama winning the state by an even larger margin than he did in 2008.Another factor was Kyrillos’ hope that some of the allegations that had come out post-2012 election contending Menendez had ethical lapses, would have made their way into the headlines prior to voters going to the polls, he said.Third, and most notably – at least for Monmouth and Ocean counties, the home of Kyrillos’ base of support – was Super Storm Sandy striking so close to the general election. “It killed us in our base,” he said.“Mostly,” he said, “it’s a very tough state,” to run for statewide office under the Republican banner, as the electorate continues to skew blue, returning Democrats to those offices.New Jersey voters haven’t sent a Republican to the Senate since Clifford P. Case.“I’m really mindful of the difficulty of a Republican running in New Jersey in federal (election) years – especially in presidential years,” he said.With the rapidly approaching primary and looming special election on Wednesday, Oct. 16 – less than three weeks before the general election – the tightly compressed race would have been daunting to mount for anyone, Kyrillos said.Since he ran last year, that would have meant running for the statewide office again less than a year later and during a two-month period, and again in 2014 for a full six-year term; an exhausting – and expensive – prospect, even for a veteran pol.Paul Tsongas, the late senator from Massachusetts and presidential candidate, said money is the mother’s milk of American politics. It is what nurtures and nourishes political campaigns.Kyrillos said he raised about $5.5 million for his Senate run last year. It was a pretty good amount for a challenger but not nearly enough for candidates who have to have to buy advertising time in the expensive New York and Philadel­phia markets to get their message out to Garden State voters, Kyrillos said.“You really need around 10 to 20 (million dollars)” to run an effective, winning Senate campaign, he said.Last year there were 33 Senate seats, 17 gubernatorial races, plus the full 435-member House with the presidency topping the ticket. “That’s a lot of competition for available dollars,” he said.Democrats voting in the Aug. 13 primary, will choose from four candidates: Pallone, against whom Kyrillos had run unsuccessfully in 1992; Rep. Rush Holt, D-12th, who has represented his district for 15 years; state Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver, who represents Essex County; and Newark Mayor Cory Booker.Republicans will choose from two candidates in the primary: Steve Lonegan, former mayor of the Bergen County community of Bogota, who unsuccessfully sought the GOP nomination in 2005 and 2009; Dr. Alieta Eck, a Piscataway physician.Christie last week tapped Attorney General Jeffrey Chiesa to service in the Senate until the special election. He was sworn in Monday, June 10.With this roster, Kyrillos called Booker the “presumptive incumbent for all practical purposes,” saying the Newark mayor had marquee name value and fundraising ability and apparatus in place.But it’s still early in the process. “This year will be even still more unpredictable,” because it’s an “off-off year election” Kyrillos said. “The turnout may be even smaller and it may be a surprise result.”Having just fought back an unusual challenge for his Senate seat during the June 4 primary election, Kyrillos plans on campaigning for Christie – the two have a strong personal friendship that dates back to their college days – and for other candidates around the state.last_img read more

SUPERSTAR BEHOLDER WINS GRADE I, $400,000 VANITY MILE BY 1 ½ LENGTHS AS STEVENS & MANDELLA COMBINE FOR HER EIGHTH CONSECUTIVE WIN IN 1:35.97

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (June 4, 2016)–There is simply no stopping the mighty Beholder. With three Eclipse Awards and a pair of Breeders’ Cup victories, she is already considered one the game’s all-time great distaffers. Saturday’s Grade I, $400,000 Vanity Mile provided yet another testament to her greatness as she sat just off a dawdling first quarter mile of 25.03 and smoked home under Gary Stevens to win by 1 ½ measured lengths while getting the distance in 1:35.97.In the care of trainer Richard Mandella for more than four years now, the 6-year-old mare by Henny Hughes registered her 10th Grade I victory and her 17th win from 22 overall starts. Owned by B. Wayne Hughes’ Spendthrift Farm, LLC, she won for the eighth consecutive time and is now an incredible 13 for 14 at Santa Anita, where she hopes to take on the boys in the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic in November.“If someone told me before the race that we would go in 25 for the first quarter, I would say ‘No way,’” said Stevens, who has now won 11 races in 12 tries with the sure-to-be first ballot Hall of Famer. “I thought we would go in sub 23, 45 and change for the second quarter and I thought the final time would be under 1:34. Twenty five is legit, 49 is legit, but I think that’s the fastest last three eighths I’ve ever run in my life and she was lovin’ every minute of it.“She’s like family to me. I don’t spend as much time with her as Richard does and everyone at the barn, but she’s very special to me. She’s the best thing I ever have ridden, or I ever will ride. I’m blessed to be on her back.”The prohibitive 1-5 favorite in a field of five fillies and mares three and up, Beholder paid $2.40, $2.10 and $2.10. (There was $791,272 bet on her to show, with the total show pool at $854,497, creating a minus pool of $160,051).“I’ve had a lot of great horses, but not like this,” said Hughes, who following Beholder’s last win stated that she would run again at age seven if “everything is perfect.” “I don’t think this will ever happen to me again…She’s definitely the best horse I’ve ever owned, maybe the best horse anyone has ever owned. She’s better this year than she was last year. She bigger, stronger and faster.”The winner versus males of the Grade I Pacific Classic last summer, Hughes said that Beholder would remain in Southern California for the rest of the year.“The Breeders’ Cup (at Santa Anita) in November is the main goal,” he said. “The Pacific Classic is our intention right now but I don’t know the dates of everything. I’m just happy with her winning a race. Even though I take credit for it, Richard makes all the decisions.”In a performance that likely would have won the Vanity in many years, Stellar Wind, trainer John Sadler’s Eclipse Award winning 3-year-old Filly from 2015, ran a huge second in her 4-year-old debut under Victor Espinoza. Full of run while a joint third at the rail passing the five furlong marker, Stellar Wind angled three-wide, just outside of Beholder leaving the quarter pole and outran longshot Finest City by three quarters of a length for the place.Off at 3-1, Stellar Wind paid $2.20 and $2.10.Ridden by Tyler Baze, Finest City, who sat a close third most of the trip, finished 2 ¼ lengths in front of early pacesetter Lost Bus. Off at 12-1, Finest City paid $2.40 to show.Fractions on the race were 25.03, 49.31, 1:12.53 and 1:23.99.Racing resumes on Sunday at Santa Anita with first post time for a nine-race card at 2 p.m. Admission gates open at 11:30 a.m.last_img read more

South Africa needs to get on the technology trajectory

first_imgThe opportunities of the digital age could be the engine of growth for South Africa, delegates heard at the Vision 2030 Summit. It needed more investment in skills and infrastructure, but it could use technology to push local innovation.The digital age offers South Africa the opportunity to change the face of our economy. (Image: Strike a pose photography)Sulaiman PhilipInvestment in information and communications technology infrastructure today will bear fruit before the National Development Plan (NDP) ends in 2030. Embracing the opportunities of the digital age could be the engine of growth in South Africa. This was the view of speakers at the Vision 2030 Summit held in Johannesburg between 21 and 22 June.As Limpopo Premier Chupu Mathabatha pointed out in his keynote address, to work towards a possible future we need to be able to visualise it. The NDP is that vision. “The people of South Africa, united in their diversity, have all embraced this future as visualised in the NDP. The challenge for all of us is to put shoulder to the wheel and work in unity towards this shared future.”The South African contextBrand South Africa’s head of research, Dr Petrus de Kock, set the context upon which South Africa needs to build. South Africa, despite its many challenges, remains a magnet for investment. For South Africans, it still offers the best opportunity for personal development. “We talk about vision but to transform our world we need imagination.”The world, De Kock pointed out, was still recovering from the economic meltdown of 2008. In some countries, especially Western economies, that had led to more aggressive inward-looking policies. South Africa had escaped the worst and as future growth would be driven by the Asian/African axis, we could grow if we were ready.“We talk about vision but to transform our world we need imagination,” Dr de Kock speaking at the Vision 2030 Summit. (Image: Strike a Pose Photography)The country and its people remained open and welcoming he said, and pointed to our tolerance as a society. “We exist in a unique context. We are unique in our constitutional acceptance of difference, religious tolerance for example. This is the identity of who we are.”The future can be in ICTPost and Telecommunications Deputy Minister Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams — like the speakers who spoke after her — championed the benefits of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. She has been a strong advocate for the benefits that that will accrue to South Africa if we embrace the digital world.“We need to integrate digital goals into our day to day lives. We need to become comfortable with the changes and benefits that will come. Most importantly, we need to be more than just consumers of the internet.”Ndabeni-Abrahams said South Africans needed to embrace the 21st century. The digital age, she said, would allow the country to show off the innovation of which we were capable. The deputy minister acknowledged that South Africa faced infrastructure challenges, but added that innovative solutions would help to make the best use of the infrastructure we had.“We have launched the Internet for All with a pilot project in the OR Tambo municipality. The idea is that no matter where you are, you will have access. We can find solutions that have South African characteristics.”Beyond infrastructure, South Africa’s shortage of skills in digital industries had hamstrung the growth of the sector. In response to this dearth, she pointed to the public-private programme with Google, which had undertaken to train 5 million coders over five years, as the way forward.“We need to work together to breach the skills gap. We need to find these innovative ways forward, solutions that show that not only are we spending, but that we’re gaining on more digitally advanced nations.”InfrastructureOne of the important benefits of the digital age highlighted by the deputy minister would be the lower cost of communication. Working towards lowering costs while still innovating was Siemens’ history in South Africa since it started doing business in the country in 1860.Sabine Dall’Omo, Siemens South Africa chief executive, highlighted the company’s relevance in South Africa. Its operations contributed R6.8-billion to gross domestic product (GDP) and its technology lay at the heart of 31 mega projects. From the first telegraph built, the company had been “driving innovation and now driving digitisation”.A benefit of the digital age often overlooked was the way technology was making it easier and cheaper to transfer technology to developing nations. This benefit had allowed Siemens to use innovations developed in more mature economies to benefit South Africa.It did so in the automotive industry, for example: “One hundred and twenty thousand cars — or 50% — of cars produced in South Africa are built using Siemens technology.”Siemens’ Sabine Dall’omo and Dr Petrus de Kock being interviewed after their presentations. (Image: Strike a Pose Photography)eCommerceTo highlight the importance of the internet to economic growth, the Chinese TELE company Huawei monitored sales on one day — 18 June 2017. The study highlighted the power and opportunity presented by e-commerce.Huawei studied the buying habits of people on T-Mall, the Chinese online shopping service.It found:In a five-minute spell 200 tons of milk powder were bought onlineIn a seven-minute period 200 million nappies were boughtIn a 26-minute spell 10 million lipsticks were boughtThe fastest time between order and delivery was 13 minutes85% of all orders that day were made on a mobile deviceThis, in the words of Leonard Chang, Huawei’s managing director of corporate industry development and marketing, showed the power e-commerce had to create economic miracles. If South Africa was to meet the growth requirements of the NDP it needed to embrace digitisation. “Connectivity is not only a human right but an economic growth right.”Digitisation could be the engine for growth. While South Africa had among the strongest ICT policy frameworks, investment from the government and the public sector had lagged. The company’s research had shown that for every additional dollar (about R12) invested in ICT infrastructure there could be a $5 benefit to GDP growth by 2025.In the recently released Huawei 2017 Global Connectivity Index, it was reported that South Africa led Africa in terms of connectivity but lagged behind the rest of the world. “If we go at the same pace as we do today, we may never catch up with the frontrunners. At the same time, we must realise there is no shortcut in climbing the ladder of digital transformation.”The NDP was a start, but the vision was never enough, Chang warned. The country needed to move faster to close the digital divide. South Africa needed a strong action plan with achievable targets. One area that needed improvement was building ICT talent.Building skillsMymoena Ismail, the CEO of the National Electronic Media Institute of South Africa (Nemisa), believes South Africa was closing in on the Mobile Moment – when there was at least one mobile smartphone per citizen.She explained that the world was close to a new kind of future. “We are going to see a convergence of a new kind of tech, one that seamlessly merges physical, digital and biological spheres. If we do not take advantage and adapt, we will not benefit.”Her organisation focused on developing e-skill capacity in South Africa by offering training courses across the country. “We are part of the solution to ensure South Africa has the necessary skills to be leaders in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.”In his address, Mathabatha said the NDP identified a stronger and better educational system and a more equal society as the keys to unlock economic growth. “The NDP envisions a South Africa where everyone feels free yet bound to others; where everyone embraces their full potential, a country where opportunity is determined not by birth, but by ability, education and hard work.“This is a vision embraced by all South Africans. The challenge, as I have said, is about navigating the routes towards such a future.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more