Tag: 探探上约多少钱一晚

Kyle Lofton has become St. Bonaventure’s silent floor general as a freshman

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 29, 2018 at 10:22 am Contact Danny: dremerma@syr.edu | @DannyEmerman Through his first 12 games at St. Bonaventure, freshman Kyle Lofton has proved point guards don’t need to bark out instructions to be effective. He knows he can be a leader without being the loudest in the locker room and on the court. “He’s vocal when he has to be, but he’s not the loudest kid,” Tom Espinoza, who coached Lofton at Putnam (Connecticut) Science Academy, said. “Kyle has that leadership quality. People just go with him and respect him — it’s amazing.”Lofton, St. Bonaventure’s silent floor general, developed a jump shot after scouts questioned his shooting ability. After earning no Division I offers, he proved himself at Putnam, where he helped win the school’s first prep national championship. In his first 12 games for St. Bonaventure (4-8), Lofton leads in the team in assists (4.0 per game) and logs the second most minutes (36.6). But entering Saturday’s game versus Syracuse (8-4), the 6-foot-3 point guard will have to learn to overcome his soft-spoken personality to thrive in the Carrier Dome’s rowdy environment.Instead of being vocal, Lofton leads by example. He knows every play from each position and often reminds his teammates where to be in practice. He soaks in advice and wisdom from his more experienced teammates and applies it in games.Lofton has always been soft-spoken, teammates and coaches said. Still, he often struggles to communicate, a necessary skill for point guards at the highest level, SBU senior Nelson Kaputo said. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think he’ll just become more vocal the more comfortable he gets playing the game of college basketball,” Kaputo said. “At the end of the day, he’s still a freshman … so he has a long way to go.”At Putnam, when some of his teammates signed with D-I schools and left campus before graduation, Lofton stayed and locked himself in the gym to continue improving his jump shot even after the season ended. Lofton improved his jumper and studied the intricacies of pick-and-roll offense, learning how to read a defense while there. He built muscle and became a better leader on the court. As his play grew more confident and aggressive, his shot followed. Lofton has an unconventional shooting form where he removes his guide hand from the ball a half-second before releasing the ball. After scouts questioned his outside stroke, Lofton shot 40 percent from beyond the arc at Putnam and currently shoots at a 34.4 percent clip with the Bonnies. “It was unbelievable what he did with us,” Espinoza said. “So it’s not a surprise what he’s doing at Bonnies.”He’s brought that same work ethic to St. Bonaventure in his first year. In addition to his passing and “elite” defense, Espinoza said, Lofton has also taken a scoring role, averaging 13.9 points per game, third-most on the team. He dropped 23 points at Vermont, 20 against Boise St. and 15 versus then-No. 17 Buffalo. At St. Bonaventure, Lofton often prefers to put his teammates in positions to score by passing to them in their spots, Kaputo said. Against Syracuse’s 2-3 zone, Lofton plans to be aggressive, looking for passing lanes to his teammates at the high post, he said. The biggest difference between D-I and the prep league, Lofton said, is the pace of play. He didn’t expect to play this many minutes this early in his freshman year, and he admits to feeling fatigued in some games.The speed of Saturday’s game against Syracuse may be more of what Lofton’s accustomed to. According to teamrankings.com, SU averages 69.4 possessions per game, 294th out of 353 D-I programs. Though Syracuse has struggled offensively, they remain tough at home, with a 7-2 record in the Carrier Dome. However, Lofton may get an extra boost from playing in the same arena as Carmelo Anthony, his favorite player growing up. Lofton’s envisioned his Dome debut since middle school, when he dreamed of lacing up orange shoes for Syracuse. In the raucous crowd of his childhood dreams, Lofton may struggle with the sole element of his game that’s held him back — he’ll need to make his voice heard. “It’s gonna be loud,” Lofton said. Commentslast_img read more

Copa America Preview : Group C

first_imgNinety-nine years ago the birth of the Copa America, the sport’s oldest continental competition, brought about a rapid change to the game of football.Held almost annually in the early years, the tournament fostered a dramatic rise in the standards of South American sides – made evident when Uruguay arrived unheralded at the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris and walked off with the gold medal. They enchanted observers with the beauty of their play and led to a question being asked: how can we find out which really is the best team around, given that professionals cannot enter the Olympics?The answer, of course, was the creation of the World Cup – first staged, and won, by Uruguay, just 14 years after they had claimed the inaugural Copa.Since then, the Copa has been through a number of phases, at times playing host to the best football in the world, at others neglected. It was brought back in 1987, and taken round all of South America’s10 footballing nations, but it found itself overshadowed by another significant development in South American football – the introduction, in 1996, of the marathon format of World Cup qualification, where all 10 nations play each other home and away, a change which has done wonders for the standard of the less traditional nations.For a few years the Copa seemed superfluous, and between 1997 and 2004 four versions were played, all with plenty of understrength teams. Since then, though, the Copa has found its place in the calendar.The 2015 edition begins today. [See also: Group A preview and Group B preview] –BrazilNumber of Copa America titles: 8Last Copa title: 2007Coach: DungaFinish in the most recent Copa: Quarterfinals Player to watch: Neymar literally broke his back trying to carry the Selecao at the World Cup in Brazil. Will the Champions League’s top-scorer finally get some help in Chile?Greatest player: Pele — Simply known as ‘The King,’ the three-time World Cup winner is considered the sport’s greatest player ever.Greatest achievement: The 1970 World Cup. Regarded as one of the greatest teams the game has ever seen, Brazil, led by Pele, swept through the 1970 World Cup in Mexico with a swashbuckling panache that would become the standard by which all other teams would be measured.– ColombiaNumber of Copa America titles: 1 Last Copa title: 2001Coach: Jose PekermanFinish in the most recent Copa: Quarterfinals Player to watch: James Rodriguez became a global star in Brazil. What will the outrageously talented No. 10 do for an encore in Chile?Greatest player: Carlos Valderrama — The hair sparked curiosity, but his skill demanded attention. El Pibe was the unquestioned star of Colombia’s golden generation and captained his country in three World Cups.Greatest achievement: The Copa America title in 2001 and the fifth-place finish in World Cup 2014. Colombia captured its first Copa America crown on home soil in 2001. Their run to the 2014 World Cup quarterfinals was their best finish in the competition.– PeruNumber of Copa America titles: 2Last Copa title: 1975Coach: Ricardo GarecaFinish in the most recent Copa: SemifinalsPlayer to watch: Paolo Guerrero is fresh off a big-money move to Brazil’s Flamengo, and the former Bayern Munich striker will be counted on to find the net in Chile — if he can shake off an ankle injury picked up in training. Greatest player: Teofilo Cubillas — The best player of Peru’s golden generation of the 1970s, Cubillas is perhaps best known for his audacious, outside-of-the-boot, free-kick goal against Scotland in the 1978 World Cup.Greatest achievement: The 1975 Copa America. A Cubillas-led Peru raised the second of its South American titles in 1975, needing penalties to beat Brazil in the Copa America final.–VenezuelaNumber of Copa America titles: 0Last Copa title: NeverCoach: Noel SanvicenteFinish in the most recent Copa: SemifinalsPlayer to watch: Jose Salomon Rondon, 25, looked at home leading the front line for Zenit St. Petersburg in the UEFA Champions League this season. The Copa America is a stage that won’t overawe the young gun.Greatest player: Juan Arango — Venezuela, for years a CONMEBOL doormat, has seen its fortunes change completely since 2000, and Arango — La Vinotinto’s captain and caps and goals leader — has been at the forefront of their evolution.Greatest moment: The 2011 Copa America semifinals appearance. Venezuela’s march to the Copa America semis in 2011 improved upon the country’s quarterfinals appearance — its first — in the 2007 edition.[See also: Group A preview and Group B preview]–last_img read more