Tag: 千花网

Video: Texas A&M DT Daylon Mack Delivered A Clowney-Like Hit Against Nevada

first_imgDaylon Mack makes an enormous hit on a Nevada player.Daylon Mack HitYou remember that Jadeveon Clowney hit on Michigan running back Vincent Smith during the 2013 Outback Bowl, right? Of course you do.Well, Texas A&M freshman defensive tackle Daylon Mack just did his best Clowney impression on a poor Nevada ball-carrier. Note to Aggie opponents: probably unwise to leave this guy unblocked like Nevada did right here. My goodness. Keep in mind this is the same kid who did this last week.Mack is going to be a good one.last_img

G E Shipping Buys Suezmax Crude Carrier

first_imgzoom Mumbai-based Great Eastern Shipping (G E Shipping) has signed a contract to buy a 150,000 dwt Suezmax crude carrier.The company said that the 2000-built vessel is expected to join its fleet in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2017.Earlier in December, G E Shipping took delivery of a secondhand Supramax dry bulk carrier Jag Radha, built in 2009.The 58,000 dwt vessel, previously known as Star Manx, was purchased from the Isle of Man-based shipping company LT Ugland Shipping in October 2016.Great Eastern Shipping’s fleet currently stands at 38 vessels, comprising 24 tankers and 14 dry bulk carriers, with an average age of 8.89 years.Additionally, the company has one newbuilding Kamsarmax on order and expects the delivery of two secondhand Aframaxes.last_img read more

Nunavut afflicted by dire health statistics

first_imgAPTN National NewsNew numbers are confirming what Nunavut residents have claimed for years, that they have the worst health problems in the country.According to numbers published by the Canadian institute for health information, if you live in Nunavut, you are twice as likely to die of something that you could have received treatment.Worse than that, you are three times more likely than other Canadians to die from a preventable cause, like smoking or excessive drinking.The study also pointed out Nunavut’s low rate of mental health treatment, because of few mental health resources in the territory.last_img read more

Ohio State mens basketball hangs on vs Illinois 7573 for 6th straight

OSU junior forward Marc Loving (2) celebrates during a game against Air Force on Dec. 8 in Columbus. OSU won, 74-50. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorThe Ohio State men’s basketball team extended its win streak to six games Sunday, as it defeated Illinois 75-73 in a close-fought conference matchup in Columbus. OSU survived the Fighting Illini’s 3-point barrage in the second half, narrowly escaping as Illinois’ last-second heave bounced off the left side of the backboard. After the game, OSU coach Thad Matta said he was impressed by Illinois’ performance, as the visitors played OSU tough up until the final whistle.“I thought Illinois played very, very well,” Matta said. “They hit some of the (timeliest) shots that I’ve ever seen. Give our guys credit, (because) a few weeks ago we would have probably crumbled, but we kept our composure, we kept fighting.” The Buckeyes were led by the play of junior forward Marc Loving, who had 27 points and seven rebounds. The win pushes the Scarlet and Gray’s record to 10-5, including a 2-0 mark in the Big Ten.Matta said getting high-level play from Loving, the most experienced player on the team, is essential to the team’s success. “Marc was very, very efficient tonight,” Matta said. “I think he kind of had a huge three in the corner, but also was able to put the ball down on the floor, got to the foul line. Marc has had a really, really good focus the last few games and, as your lone upperclassman on a basketball team, you hope that’s something we can continue to ride on.” OSU was able to ice the game at the free throw line, shooting 28-of-39 from the stripe for the game. Both teams were in foul trouble early in the second half, much to the disdain of Illinois coach John Groce.“We’ve got to play a lot harder without fouling,” Groce said. “That’s the highest number of free throws an opponent has shot against us all year and that was the difference in the game.” Groce’s team only made 12 of 32 3-point attempts, and overall OSU held Illinois to 40 percent shooting from the field. Matta said although the defense is not be where he ultimately wants it to be, he is happy with the way the defense is playing.“I think that we’re getting there,” Matta said. “The thing that I would say that I’m not pleased with is we made some mistakes and they made us pay for them tonight. Those are things that are happen. I do think we’re understanding scouting more. We’ve got to continue to build it, but I like the direction we’re headed with our defense.” For OSU, the first half was one to forget, as the team was held to only 32 percent shooting from the field, thanks to the 2-3 zone Illinois employed. The rough first half, however, could perhaps be attributed to the absence of freshman point guard JaQuan Lyle, who picked up two fouls in the opening two minutes of play. The Buckeyes clung to a 30-26 lead going into halftime, looking for improved results in the second frame.OSU found those results with Lyle back on the court. With their starting point guard leading the offense, the Buckeyes returned to form in the second half — seeing a near-instant improvement. With Lyle running the show, OSU shot 52 percent from the floor in the second half.“I couldn’t be happier with the way (JaQuan) played,” Matta said. Lyle said he was disappointed to pick up two quick fouls and put his team in a bind early on, but knew when he came back in the second half, he would have a chance to lead his team to victory. “My mindset was that I was fresh,” Lyle said. “Everyone else had been playing the whole first 20 minutes so I took advantage of that. My legs were fresh and I made a couple of layups. Then I just started making plays.” Lyle poured in 14 points and a team-high 5 assists — all in the second half — for OSU.The Buckeyes, now on a hot streak with six straight wins, will move to face Northwestern on Wednesday in Evanston, Illinois, which Matta said will be a good test for his basketball team.“We’re going to see where we are,” Matta said. “The last road game against (Connecticut), we were awful. It will be interesting to see how we come out to start that game. Northwestern is playing some great basketball right now and it’s always a tough place to play.”Tip-off against the Wildcats is set for 9 p.m. read more

New defensive coaches Larry Johnson Chris Ash ready to get started at

Defensive line coach Larry Johnson talks during an interview on National Signing Day Feb. 5 at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editor Co-defensive coordinator and safeties coach Chris Ash talks with media on National Signing Day Feb. 5 at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorWhen Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer gets into recruiting mode, it isn’t all about the players. He finds a way to woo coaches, too.After the departures of co-defensive coordinator and safeties coach Everett Withers and defensive line coach Mike Vrabel, Meyer had two vital positions to fill on a defense that allowed an average of 377.4 yards per game and ranked No. 47 in the country.Now after hiring two new coaches — both of whom spent time at rival schools — Meyer said he is pleased with his new hires.“We replaced (Vrabel and Withers) with Larry Johnson and Chris Ash, but a couple of comments with those gentlemen we hired. First, they wanted to be here, they both had very, very good jobs and they wanted to be here,” Meyer said to the media Wednesday.Johnson, who takes over as defensive line coach after 18 years with Penn State, inherits a unit that is set to return all four starters and helped spearhead the country’s ninth ranked running defense.Johnson said he can’t wait for a chance to work with the group of players.“Just watching from afar and watching it on videotape, I think it’s a very talented young group,” Johnson said Wednesday. “I can’t wait to get my hands on them. I’ve had two chances to watch them and I’m like a little kid. It’s like I’ve got some new toys to play with. I’m really excited to impart my wisdom to these guys and see how they respond.”Junior Michael Bennett, sophomores Noah Spence and Adolphus Washington and freshman Joey Bosa totaled 24 of OSU’s 42 sacks this past season.Meyer said he took notice of Johnson when putting together his initial staff at OSU, but didn’t hire him at the time because of Vrabel.“Larry Johnson is a guy (I have) had great respect for (for) many years,” Meyer said. “Made a phone call two years ago when I was hired here in December whatever year that was, I called Larry. We discussed Ohio State, but then I made the decision to hire Mike Vrabel. We just didn’t have a spot. Noah Spence’s dad called and said Larry (Johnson) would like to talk to you about a position … And the communication was great. We went and met in Indianapolis … and it was a no-brainer on our end.”Although Johnson’s pedigree as a coach is impressive, his abilities as a recruiter find a way to be noticed.Johnson said it is his “brand” that allows him to recruit players well.“I think obviously it’s my niche but I think the brand that I have is, I’m a teacher, I’m a fundamental development kind of guy,” he said. “I want to develop players into outstanding people and players and I think that all goes together.”Although the defensive line heads into 2014 with momentum, the Buckeyes’ secondary — which is now headed by former Arkansas defensive coordinator and secondary coach Chris Ash — doesn’t have quite the same hype.The unit finished the year ranked No. 112 in the country with an average of 268 yards per game and also loses four regular contributors in redshirt-senior safeties Corey “Pitt” Brown and C.J. Barnett, senior safety Christian Bryant and redshirt-junior cornerback Bradley Roby.Meyer said it is Ash’s job to work on the pass defense.“He’s got a serious responsibility. That’s to improve our pass defense. He’ll be in charge of the entire back end of our defense,” Meyer said.Ash — who was named co-defensive coordinator and safeties coach upon his arrival in Columbus — said Wednesday he understood what Meyer wanted out of him as a coach.“When we met first, he discussed his vision for the defense and what he wanted to see when the film was turned on … There has been a great tradition of outstanding defenses here at Ohio State, (but) the last couple years it just wasn’t to the level that they wanted. Coach wanted to make some changes and go a different direction,” Ash said.Ash added that he expects his team to play one way: at full throttle.“Well, you play fast, you play with reckless abandon, you’re fast, you’re physical, you throw your body around. You play without hesitation,” Ash said. “There’s no confusion, you know exactly what you’re doing. You can react to your key and there’s only one speed: it’s full speed. And that’s the way we gotta play.”In each of his last two seasons at Wisconsin, before he took the job at Arkansas for what ended up being his lone year there this past season, Ash coached defenses that finished in the top 20 in passing yards allowed per game.Even with the new additions to the coaching staff, Meyer said he plans on taking a more involved role in the defense in the coming seasons.“I’m going to be more involved than I ever have been, just to make sure that we get up to standard at Ohio State on (the) defensive side of the ball with emphasis on pass defense,” Meyer said.The Buckeyes are scheduled to get their 2014 season underway Aug. 30 against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore.But before the season kicks off, there are some things the coaches need to learn about being a part of the OSU program.“There’s so much to learn. I walked in the first day and someone said, ‘Hey coach, no blue pens,’ and I didn’t know that,” Johnson said. “So there’s a lot of little things that I’ve got to learn pretty fast when you’re talking the team up north … As far as football and all those things, that’s easy. The learning (of) the ins and outs of Ohio State football, that’s the challenge for me.”But even with all of the new things he has to learn, Johnson said at least one aspect of the change is a plus.“My wife said I look good in red, so that’s a good start.” read more

Mens soccer Ohio State seeks revenge against Michigan State in Big Ten

Senior defender Hunter Robertson (6) passes the ball upfield during the OSU vs. Penn State game on Tuesday. Credit: Ris Twigg | Assistant Photo EditorThe No. 6 seed Ohio State men’s soccer team hits the road and looks for revenge against the No. 3 seeded Spartans in the first round of the Big Ten tournament at 1 p.m. Sunday at DeMartin Stadium in East Lansing, Michigan.The Buckeyes (7-9-1, 3-5-0 Big Ten) enter the matchup riding an eight-game losing streak, which started against the Spartans, as Ohio State lost 5-1 on Oct. 1. In their last game of the season, the Buckeyes fell 2-0 to Wisconsin.Head coach John Bluem thought the cause of the loss came from self-inflicted mistakes by the team.“I think what we learned most from that game is that our own mistakes is what really killed us,” Bluem said. “Immediately after tying the game up, before halftime we allowed another goal which kind of killed us. In the second half, I don’t think we had the attitude and the mental capacity to come back from that mistake.”The Spartans (11-2-3, 5-0-3 Big Ten) are coming off of a 1-1 tie against Indiana and are undefeated at home this season (5-0-2). The five in-conference wins were the most in program history.Senior forward Nate Kohl believes the loss earlier in the season to the Spartans was not an accurate representation of Ohio State.“We’re going to Michigan State and it’s not an easy place to play, but I believe that if we play at our very best I think we can beat them,” Kohl said. “I mean the game we played earlier in East Lansing this year, I don’t think it was the character of our team. A 5-1 loss wasn’t Ohio State soccer, we’re going to come out and we’re going to be ready to play.”The Buckeyes are led offensively by junior midfielder Abdi Mohamed, who has 11 points (three goals, five assists), and freshman forward Joshua Jackson-Ketchup, who has seven points (three goals, one assist). But scoring will not be easy against junior goalkeeper Jimmy Hague, who was the first-ever Spartan to win Big Ten Goalkeeper of the Year.Ohio State will take on a tough Spartan defense, which ranks second in the nation in shutout percentage (.643) and 11th in team goals against average (.667).The Spartans are led offensively by junior forward Ryan Sierakowski, who has 17 points (seven goals, three assists), and junior forward Dejuan Jones, who has 16 points (six goals, four assists). The Buckeyes hope to return starting sophomore goalie Parker Siegfried, who is 7-5-1 on the season.The Buckeye defense is holding opponents to 1.24 goals per game, but Siegfried allows just .90 goals per game and has picked up seven shutouts.Senior defender Hunter Robertson is embracing the Buckeyes’ underdog role and thinks it can play to their advantage. “Every year I’ve played in the Big Ten tournament there has always been some upsets,” Robertson said. “They thrashed us the first time, but I think this time if we can bring more intensity into the gameplay, be more physical, and if we can get one or two on them we can win the game.”Even though it’s single-game elimination, Robertson has confidence in his team to push through the adversity presented to them.“One game at a time, if you lose you’re out that’s the mindset right now,” Robertson said. “If we lose this game it’s my last game playing at Ohio State and I really don’t want that to happen, so I’ll do whatever I can to prevent it.”Robertson is one of three Ohio State players in the past 10 years to start in over 80 matches. He wants his senior year to continue and to have the chance to set the school record for most starts in program history, which would only be possible if the Buckeyes make it to the National Championship game.“If you would have told me that I was going to have that many starts when I first came in, I probably would’ve laughed and told you that you were crazy,” Robertson said. “I feel very humble and appreciative of every opportunity the coaches have given me and this has been, by far, the best experience of my life and I hope I can drag it out for as long as possible.” read more

Time Inc Using SpinOff Debt to Buy IPC Media

first_imgTime Warner officially announced that it’s spinning Time Inc. off with $1.4 billion in debt, adding that the financing will be used to purchase Time Inc.’s U.K. operation, IPC Media. The debt will be raised through an offering of unsecured senior notes and Time Inc. will enter into a secured loan facility, according to a statement. Whatever remains of the debt facility after buying IPC will be used to pay a cash dividend back to Time Warner. Time Warner’s chief financial officer Howard Averill first revealed a $1.3 billion debt load attached to the Time Inc. spin-off in early February during TW’s fourth quarter earnings call.Time Warner bought IPC Media, which publishes brands such as Woman’s Weekly, NME and InStyle, in 2001 for about $1.7 billion.The spinoff is on track to happen by the end of the second quarter.last_img read more

In Rural Utah Preventing Suicide Means Meetin

first_img https://ondemand.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2019/08/20190826_me_in_rural_utah_p… In Rural Utah, Preventing Suicide Means Meeting Gun Owners… by NPR News Erik Neumann 8.26.19 7:32am A gun show might not be the first place you would expect to talk about suicide prevention — especially in a place like rural northeast Utah, where firearms are deeply embedded in the local culture.But one Friday at the Vernal Gun & Knife Show, four women stood behind a folding table for the Northeastern Counseling Center with exactly that in mind.Amid a maze of tables displaying brightly varnished rifle stocks, shotguns and the occasional AR-15 assault-style rifle, they waited, ready to talk with show attendees.”Lethal access to lethal means makes a difference. Suicide attempts by any other means are less lethal,” says one of the women, Robin Hatch, a prevention coordinator with Northeastern Counseling for nearly 23 years.Utah has one of the highest rates of death by suicide in the U.S. And 85% of firearm deaths in the state are suicides. According to Utah’s health department, suicide rates can vary widely depending on where you are. For example, the suicide rate in northeast Utah is 58% higher than the rest of the state.Suicide by gun is a particular problem: The rate in rural areas is double that in urban areas, according to state officials.A major factor is the easy access to firearms in Utah — and the grim fact that suicide attempts involving guns have a higher mortality rate than by other means.This was the first time Hatch and her colleagues at Northeastern Counseling were doing outreach at a gun show.As the auditorium filled with firearm sellers and hunters, the counselors stacked their folding tables with neat piles of free cable locks that thread into a gun to prevent rounds from being loaded, and water-resistant gun socks screen-printed on the outside with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number.The idea behind distributing both devices is to slow a person down during a moment of crisis. “Anything that we can do to get people off track a little bit, thinking something different,” Hatch explains. “We believe that will help make a difference in our suicide rates.”Unpredictable employment adds stressThe northeast corner of Utah is home to oil and gas fields, cattle ranches and the Uintah and Ouray Reservation.Health experts say factors contributing to the high suicide rates in the area include limited access to mental health services in rural communities and the unpredictability of the ranching and oil and gas industries. The boom-bust cycles, along with physical and mental stress, take a toll on workers.”Injuries and accidents, keeping your job, having a job tomorrow. It’s so up and down,” says Val Middleton, a former oil and gas safety instructor at Uintah Basin Technical College in Vernal. “The guys don’t eat right typically. No exercise, hard work, long hours, no sleep. That’s what adds up. The divorce rate is high, really high. The family life is low.”Add high gun ownership and the risks are increased.Dee Cairoli is a pastor at Roosevelt Christian Assembly in a neighboring town. He also works part time as an NRA concealed-carry handgun instructor. When hosting classes, Cairoli explains how gun owners can intervene if another gun owner shows signs of a mental health crisis.”I’ve done it a couple of times as a pastor where I’ve gone to somebody’s house and said, ‘Look, maybe you need to listen to me for a minute. I know what I’m talking about. I promise I’ll keep it in my [gun] safe, but let me have your gun.’ “Cairoli speaks with authority. When he was 15, his father killed himself with a gun.”It was very tragic, but I never hated the gun. I never blamed the gun. I knew that it was just his desperate moment and that he had just chosen that,” Cairoli says.He believes that personal tragedy, along with the credibility he brings as a gun user and local pastor, allows people in crisis to trust him.Not Just A Rural IssueHow to talk about suicide with guns isn’t just an issue in rural parts of Utah. It’s a topic that state Rep. Steve Eliason of Sandy, a suburban city near Salt Lake, also tackles. Eliason has sponsored legislation focused on firearms, suicide prevention and mental health services. It is personal for him, too.”I’ve lost three extended family members to suicide. All firearm suicides. Young men,” Eliason says.This year, he worked on bills to fund firearm safety and suicide prevention programs, supply gun locks, create new mental health treatment programs and expand crisis response in rural Utah.Eliason describes these issues as nonpartisan, but with Utah’s proud gun culture, he’s also careful with his approach. He describes advice he got from a politically liberal friend in public health about how to bring together opposing perspectives about firearms.”Obviously, there’s kind of two schools of thought on firearms,” he says. “Those two schools of thought, if they were circles, they would overlap into a small oval — that oval is the culture of safety. And she says, ‘I would recommend that you dwell within that oval.’ That’s what I’ve tried to do.”That perspective led to the Utah legislature appropriating money to fund a study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in consultation with the Utah Shooting Sports Council. That study spurred discussions about the problem of firearms and suicide and formed the basis of at least one of Eliason’s 2019 bills, to expand access to gun locks.Like Eliason’s work at the state policy level, Hatch’s suicide prevention work in her community depends on relationships and trust.Hatch’s table at the gun show was less busy than others. But the women gave out hundreds of gun locks and gun socks over the course of the day. And attendees said having them there was a fitting way to bring up the subject of suicide and firearms.”You need to know your community, and you need to address it in a way that your community will accept it,” Hatch says.This story comes from NPR’s reporting partnership with KUER and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more

Setting the stage

first_imgBringing together the best of Indian theatre from the year gone by, the Mahindra Excellence in Theatre Awards and Festival (META) is staging some exceptional plays in the Capital at LTG Auditorium and Kamani Auditorium. The Festival is on till March 26.Dhou… The Wave by the nominated in the Best Director, Best Innovative Sound Design, Best Stage Design, Best Costume Design, Best Choreography, Best Actor in Supporting Role(Female), Best Ensemble category was performed on March 23. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Produced by Purbaranga and directed by Gunakar Dev Goswami,  Dhou, the wave is a powerful story of a lonely, wise old fisherman who conquers a magnificent fish, endures the heart breaking loss of it and rises gallantly above his defeat. Kaumudi, nominated in categories such as Best Director, Best Actor in a Lead Role (Male), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Male), Best Original Script, Best Ensemble was about a rite of passage. Kaumudi has been inspired by two texts: Anand’s Malayalam novel Vyasam Vigneswaram and Jorge Luis Borges’ essay Blindness. Using the ‘moonlit timeless night’ when Krishna delivers his sermon to Arjuna as its central trope, this play explores the dynamics between an estranged father-son duo who play Eklavya’s ghost and Abhimanyu respectively, in a theatre, in late 1960’s Allahabad. The father, Satyasheel, who is a great actor and has almost lost his sight, is at his final three performances. Thus son, Paritosh, who grew up with the void of not having a father by his side, has come to challenge not only the father but also his entire school of thought. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixKaumudi is hinged on three central questions: Whose life is more valuable, an older or a younger person’s? Is personal ethic more important than public ethic? Does art have an unction, and do we make art or does art make us? It also holds up a mirror to it and questions theatre: Matthi, performed on March 24 is nominated in the Best Director, Best Stage Design, Best Light Design, Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Female), Best Original Script, Best Ensemble, Best Choreography categories.  Produced by Malayalakalanilayam and directed by Jino Joseph the play travels through the Kerala during 1970 – 80s with its political, social and cultural rigor and people’s collective movements. It portrays its cultural deterioration with migrant labors and the shift in the ideology and social harmony. Another play screened on March 24 was Still and Still Moving at the Kamani Auditorium Time. Nominated for Best Director, Best Original Script, Best Actor in a lead Role (Male), Best Light Design, the play is produced by Tadpole Repertory and directed directed by Neel Chaudhari.Still and Still Moving is set in North Delhi and Gurgaon. It is the story of Partho, a reclusive writer in his forties, and Adil, a young college student. Their fractured love affair plays out across two poles of a changing metropolis, punctuated by observations on the interactions of men on the Delhi Metro.last_img read more

Second accident on Hilderstone Road within hours

first_imgGet the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA road has closed due to an accident this morning – seemingly just minutes after reopening following an earlier accident. Hilderstone Road is shut between between B5027 Uttoxeter Road and Butterhill Lane. This is a separate incident to the earlier accident on this stretch which saw a vehicle overturn. The road reopened following the earlier accident, which took place at around 5.30am, at around 6.20am. Traffic data company INRIX reports this second accident took place shortly before 6.40am. Police are reported to be on the scene. Read MoreRoad reopens following ‘police incident’ in early hours of the morning Both accidents have taken place on the same stretch of road (Image: Inrix/Google) Both accidents are affecting traffic between Hilderstone and Sandon/the A51. We will bring you an update when one becomes available. Want to keep up to date with the latest traffic and travel news?Each day Stoke-on-Trent Live journalists bring you the latest news on the roads and railways across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire, South Cheshire and further afield to help keep you on the move. For the very latest updates on roads including the M6, A500, A50 and more, visit our dedicated traffic and travel news channel here. We also run a live news feed each weekday, which you can access on our website’s homepage from 7am to 9pm from Monday to Friday. And for more as-we-get-it updates on the roads across the region and beyond, join The Sentinel’s traffic and travel Facebook group here.last_img read more

Rep Maturen hosts family of fallen first responder for Sept 11 Memorial

first_img07Sep Rep. Maturen hosts family of fallen first responder for Sept. 11 Memorial Service Categories: Maturen News,News State Rep. David Maturen today took part in the annual House ceremony recognizing first responders and members of the military who died in the line of duty during the past year.Maturen, of Vicksburg, read the names of Wayne State University K9 Officer Collin Rose, who was shot and killed on Nov. 22, 2016, and Comstock Township Fire Chief Edward Switalski, who died in the line of duty on June 13 of this year. Maturen also invited relatives of the two men, who lived in the communities he represents, to attend the ceremony.“The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, demonstrated the heroic lengths first responders and members of the military went to attempting to save the lives of people in the World Trade Center and the Pentagon,” Maturen said. “We conduct this ceremony at the Capitol every year so we can honor the heroes from our communities who put their lives on the line every day they go to work. It helps provide comfort to family members to know the sacrifice their spouse, children or parents made is not forgotten.”The House has conducted the ceremony since September 2011, the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks.PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. David Maturen, of Vicksburg, was joined today by Randy and Karen Rose, parents of fallen Wayne State University K9 Officer Collin Rose, and Collin Rose’s fiancé, Nikki Salgot, as his guests for the Michigan House’s annual Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the Capitol. The ceremony remembers first responders and members of the military from Michigan who died in the line of duty in the past year.last_img read more

French broadcaster TF1 reported an increase in aud

first_imgFrench broadcaster TF1 reported an increase in audience share during the first half of 2013, though saw net profit and revenue drop year-on-year during Q2. The firm said that over the first six months of 2013, its four free-to-air channels achieved audience share of 29.0% among people aged four and over, a year-on-year increase of 0.6 of a point, or 2%.However, revenue for the broadcasting and content segment for the half year the period was down 7.0% at €844.2m, with advertising revenue from the free-to-air channels down 8.8% to €728.4m in the first half of 2013 and revenue for the pay TV segment down 3.9% to €258.8m.In Q2 alone, overall revenue was €642.4 million, down 4.5% year-on-year, while net profit was €48.4 million, down 17% year-on-year.last_img read more

But the department said its environmental data was

first_imgBut the department said its environmental data was “right up to date”.Mr Murphy said the road would fragment feeding grounds for protected Whooper swans.But the judgement said the road would have “no direct impact” on the birds.Mr Murphy had also claimed the decision to proceed was based on environmental surveys that were 10 years out of date. ShareTweet But a barrister for the department said the survey work had been regularly updated over the years up to 2016, when the £160m road scheme was confirmed.Mr Murphy had already lost his case in the High Court, when a judge ruled the department had acted rationally and lawfully.On Tuesday, the Court of Appeal dismissed Mr Murphy’s case, ruling that the proper assessments had been completed.The proposed route of the new A6 skirts Lough Beg, an important bird habitat with EU protection.That protection places responsibilities on the authorities to ensure any development will not adversely affect the site.Mr Murphy said it was wrong that the department should be both the developer and the competent authority charged with ensuring that the development would not have an adverse impact.Work to dual the A6 has begun on sections at either end of the contested section.But work in the middle was delayed pending the outcome of the appeal.A department spokesperson welcomed the judgement, saying it confirmed the department’s “robust economic, engineering and environmental assessment procedures”.“As a result of the judgement the Department will commence construction of the Toome to Moyola River section of the scheme which had been delayed due to the legal challenge,” said the spokesperson.ENVIRONMENTALIST CHRIS MURPHY LOSES APPEAL AGAINST A6 DERRY TO BELFAST ROAD UPGRADE RULING was last modified: September 19th, 2017 by John2John2 Tags: A large volume of traffic use the A6 Derry to Belfast road on a daily basisAN environmentalist has lost his appeal over the route of a road scheme between Derry and Belfast close to an internationally important bird sanctuary.Chris Murphy had had challenged a section of the A6 route near Toome.He claimed the Department for Infrastructure (DoI) had not carried out an appropriate assessment of the impact of the scheme. ENVIRONMENTALIST CHRIS MURPHY LOSES APPEAL AGAINST A6 DERRY TO BELFAST ROAD UPGRADE RULINGhigh courtLOUGH BEGtoomelast_img read more