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Arcata Tigers volleyball outlasts Eureka Loggers in gritty, hard-fought contest

first_imgEureka >> For the first two sets, the upstart Eureka Loggers volleyball team was every bit as good as perennial league powerhouse Arcata. But the Tigers showed why they are such a respected program, digging deep over the final two sets to claim a 3-1 victory over the Loggers on Thursday at Eureka High School.“They were super scrappy, like I knew they would be,” Arcata head coach Laurie Griffith said of the Loggers after the win. “There were so many great rallies out there. It was a fun game, …last_img read more

South Africa congratulates Obama

first_img7 November 2012 South African President Jacob Zuma has congratulated Barack Obama on his re-election as president of the United States of America. “We value our relations with the United States and look forward to strengthening bilateral cooperation in the years to come,” Zuma said in a statement shortly after Obama addressed the US early on Wednesday morning following confirmation of his victory at the polls. Zuma said that the US had an important role to play in Africa’s development. “South Africa is confident that the United States will continue to play a positive role in this regard,” he said. Obama beat a strong challenge from Republican Mitt Romney to win a second term at the White House. In a tweet to supporters, Obama said: “This happened because of you. Thank you,” as crowds cheered outside the Democrats’ Chicago headquarters ahead of his victory address. Obama was projected to have won several key swing states, including Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nevada and New Hampshire, with Romney winning only North Carolina. Florida and Virginia remained too close to call. The relentless battle for the swing states gave Obama at least 290 electoral votes, while Romney had just 201 shortly after midnight. Obama easily grabbed a host of “deep blue” states, including California, Illinois and New Jersey, while Romney prevailed in the “deep red” states of Texas, Kentucky and Georgia. While Obama supporters had already started celebrations of his re-election, Romney conceded defeat. In addition to the massive task of tackling US$1-trillion annual deficits and reducing a US$16-trillion national debt, Obama will have to deal with a divided US Congress that is likely to maintain the same partisan makeup in his second term in the White House. Source: SANews.gov.za-Xinhualast_img read more

In A Decade On The Road, I’ve Learned Tech Can’t Fix Everything

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#air travel#business travel#online travel#travel#Trip Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts center_img Matt Asay ReadWriteTrip is a series that chronicles the modern challenges of tech-savvy business travelers.For the past 10 years I’ve traveled a minimum of 125,000 miles each year, staying over 75 nights each year in a hotel room. While it would be inaccurate to suggest that business travel has become delightful, in some key ways it has become better.For example, international travel is faster thanks to Global Entry. Security is easier to navigate thanks to TSA Pre. And while luggage sizes have remained constant, far more fits into them than before.Technology, not surprisingly, is cause for both celebration and frustration in all of these changes.Staying Connected At 30,000 FeetEven five years ago, it was hard to stay productive on long-haul flights, both because laptop battery life was minimal and in-flight Wi-Fi didn’t exist. This had upsides and downsides. On the one hand, once my laptop battery died I was free to read. But on the other, it meant that every flight was effectively a productivity dead zone.No more.See also: Wi-Fi Above 10,000 Feet: Which Airlines Provide The Best Connection?Today Wi-Fi is becoming standard on air travel. While coverage varies from airline to airline, the network on my preferred airline, Delta, is exceptional. I no longer have an excuse not to be online while I fly. Alas.Now that you can stay connected on a long flight, we now expect that laptop batteries will last, too. But even if you’re still lugging around an old-model Dell that can’t go more than two hours without topping up on power, airlines have also added in-flight power outlets. Again, availability varies from airline to airline and even plane to plane. Figuring that out used to be maddening, until tech came to the rescue again: You can figure out where to get power on SeatGuru, which uses comments from travelers like me as well as its own research to maintain up-to-date information about seat layouts.Airline And Hotel Monogamy Pays Off … Sort OfOften your choice in airline and hotel will be made for you, through your location or employer or both. If you live in a United hub city like San Francisco, you’re likely stuck flying United. (I’m truly sorry.) But you do want to centralize your flights on one carrier, or one airline alliance if you’re flying internationally. Ditto for hotels.Why? Because it’s your only hope of being treated like a human being. I get upgraded on 90% of my domestic flights (Delta) and 100% of my hotel stays (Marriott). And many airlines and hotels have added perks that relate directly to your trips, like a waiver of fees for checked bags or hotel Wi-Fi.Upgrades, not points, should be your motivator. The points are nice, mind you. I’ve paid for five honeymoons for my wife’s five sisters using points, as well as several personal vacations. But it’s getting harder and harder to actually use points.This is the one big problem with loyalty programs: It has become so easy to earn points through things other than flying (e.g., branded credit cards) that loyalty points are far less valuable today than they used to be 10 years ago. The consolidation of airlines, and along with them their loyalty programs, hasn’t helped: More fliers are now competing for awards and status.If this is new to you, check out The Points Guy’s beginner’s guide—and consolidate, consolidate, consolidate.The More Things ChangeWhich brings me to the things that have gotten worse or stayed the same over the years.International voice and data roaming remain incredibly expensive. I pay $60 per month for 300 megabytes of global data and another $60 each month to be able to text freely while abroad (up to 600 SMS messages). This on top of my domestic data/voice plans. One Google Maps session while walking through London can chew up a significant chunk of that data limit so I tend to use cellular data only as a last resort while traveling abroad.This is slowly changing: T-Mobile now has an “unlimited” international text-and-data plan, though you have to read the fine print: Only 1 gigabyte of data is included at full speed. I’ve been reluctant to switch carriers, though.First-class service on all U.S. airlines has depreciated significantly in the last 10 years. Back in the early days of Pan Am, first class was truly first class. Now it’s simply enhanced coach. Yes, we have lay-flat seats on international or transcontinental flights, but the overall experience—especially on domestic routes—is weak.Even things like TSA Pre, which lets travelers go back to the halcyon days of not having to remove shoes from feet or laptops from bags at airport security, are quickly getting worse. While initially reserved only for serious frequent fliers or those in the Global Entry program, the TSA has opened it up to many others, making TSA Pre lines as slow as other lines. You’d think technology could be deployed to better screen passengers, but that doesn’t seem to be happening.If I had to sum it up, I’d say that the things you can control about business travel—what you pack and how much it weighs—have gotten better. The things you can’t control, like airline loyalty programs or airport security, have gotten both better and worse.The only thing you can truly control is the gear you put in your bag, so optimize for that. Look for more tips on that in an upcoming installment of ReadWriteTrip.Photo by Dan Paluska 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more