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Horses in Georgetown to be tested for swamp fever today

first_imgThe veterinary staff of the Guyana Livestock Development Authority (GLDA) will be in Georgetown today to take blood samples from horses to test for Equine Infectious Anaemia (EIA), also known as swamp fever.In a social media post, the Agriculture Ministry said the disease was caused by a virus and was transmitted by blood-sucking insects.Further, the Ministry informed, “The horses from which samples will be taken will also be dewormed and given vitamins at no cost to the owner as part of this exercise.”The exercise will commence at 07:00h in central Georgetown and will wind down at 15:00h in Sophia, Greater Georgetown.Officials at the GLDA told Guyana Times that owners of horses had no reason to panic as there was no outbreak of the disease. It was explained that the project is part of the organisation’s animal health work programme for this year.Similar exercises were conducted from Turkeyen to Good Hope on the East Coast of Demerara and from Brickery to Ruimveldt on the East Bank of Demerara on June 18 and 20, respectively.EIA, or swamp fever, is also called horse malaria. The virus attacks the red blood cells of horses causing anaemia, weakness, and even death.Research shows that there is no cure for the disease, and horses are required to be tested regularly.Once a horse is infected, the virus remains in the animal’s body for the rest of its life.A few warning signs of the disease may include slight to high fever for a few days, weakness, weight loss, depression, and even disorientation.Persons with enquiries can contact the GLDA on 220-6556 or 220-6557 for more information.The sudden testing for these animals come at a time when the Trinidad and Tobago Government recently took a stance to ban all poultry items from Guyana after expressing concerns over duck viral hepatitis.A memo dated May 31, 2019, and signed by the twin-island republic’s Senior Veterinary Officer informed the Customs and Excise Division of the ban.The Agriculture Ministry had announced that the GLDA’s hatchery was closed owing to the unusual death of ducklings.“There is an increased mortality rate of ducklings being hatched at our facility; additionally, we were also informed by some farmers that a similar occurrence was taking place on a number of farms throughout the various regions,” the statement said.It was later mentioned that the Muscovy breed was under threat, especially those two to three weeks old. This precipitated surveillance and monitoring exercise targeting the animals. At that time, the deaths were labelled as an “unusual occurrence”.last_img read more

Researchers develop film to prevent bacteria from growing on dental retainers and

first_imgMay 24 2018Clear, plastic aligners have been growing in popularity as alternatives to bulky, metal braces. And once the teeth are straightened, patients graduate to plastic retainers to maintain the perfect smile. But these appliances can become contaminated, so one group is now reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a film to prevent bacteria from growing on them.According to the American Association of Orthodontists, more than 5 million people seek orthodontic treatments each year. These procedures include braces and aligners, a set of plastic pieces that shift the teeth slightly over time, in an attempt to fix crowded jaws, over- and under-bites and improperly aligned teeth. Clear aligners or retainers, known collectively as clear overlay appliances (COAs) are made by taking a dental cast and using pressure or heat on a plastic sheet. But bacteria frequently build up on COAs as difficult-to-treat biofilms, and the plastics easily wear down. Scientists have turned to developing simple and affordable coatings to combat this. Drawing inspiration from super-hydrophilic antibacterial coatings on other medical devices, Hyo-Won Ahn, Jinkee Hong and colleagues wanted to see if they could make something similar for COAs in the unique oral environment.The researchers took a polymer sheet made of polyethylene terephthalate that was modified with glycol (PETG) and layered films of carboxymethylcellulose and chitosan on it. This layered film created a super-hydrophilic surface, or a surface that loves water, that prevented bacteria from adhering. When PETG with the film was compared to the bare material, bacterial growth was reduced by 75 percent. The coated plastic also was stronger and more durable, even when tested with artificial saliva and various acidic solutions. Source:https://www.acs.org/last_img read more