Month: August 2019

NTT demos 80211ac next generation highspeed WiFi

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) has demonstrated what might be the next version of high speed WiFi. Currently named 802.11ac, (wireless transmission traditionally uses .11 as opposed to .3 for Ethernet, or cable based transmission) the new proposed standard was shown to deliver 120Mbps throughput to three receivers at the same time. Citation: NTT demos 802.11ac – next generation high-speed WiFi (2011, July 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-ntt-demos-80211ac-high-speed.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The new standard uses the same 5GHz bandwidth as is currently used now in home WiFi systems; to get it to carry more data, the signal is multiplexed (sent out as round-robin bits of data from several different sources) on one end, and then de-multiplexed on the other, all using multiple-user Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) technology that in this case has been developed by NTT. The object is to get 1 Gbps per system, a rate that will be needed as bandwidth hogging applications such as ever higher video resolution or 3D content creates demand for ever faster LAN systems able to deliver such huge amounts of data to always hungry-for-more, customers. In the NTT demo at the Wireless Technology Park, in Yokohama, six antennas were used to deliver the signal, and three to receive it. The new technology developed by NTT relies on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) that utilizes mathematical algorithms to set space divisions for the data as its being multiplexed into its individual parts, and then of course to do the reverse on the other end. According to NTT, this processing could be done with a dedicated chip, instead of the FPGA, should the new standard be approved by the International IEEE standards body.Even if all goes according to plan, though, the new standard isn’t likely to be adopted until at least 2013, though that doesn’t necessarily mean products won’t ship before that date that utilize the proposed new standard, as was done with earlier wireless standards. Also helpful is the fact that 802.11ac, whatever its final form, will offer full backwards compatibility with the current version, meaning early adopters won’t do any worse than what they have now, and likely will do much better as new hardware comes available.Looking ahead past 802.11ac, the next generation of wireless LAN technology, initially dubbed 802.11ag is expected to step outside of the 5GHz currently unlicensed space, and to shoot for a tenfold gain in throughput. © 2010 PhysOrg.com NTT DoCoMo Achieves World’s First 5Gbps Packet Transmission in 4G Field Experimentlast_img read more

New exploration shows parts of North Atlantic seabed were once above sea

first_img Extending for 3,861 square miles (10,000 square km) just north east of the Orkney-Shetland Islands, and about 1.2 miles (almost 2 kilometers) beneath the surface, the undersea terrain appears to have once existed above sea level, forming an island. By examining data from echo-sounding technology employed by contractors working for oil companies, maps of the ocean floor were able to be made. The maps constructed are 3-D in nature, and thus are able to show not just the ocean floor, but what lies beneath; hence its use in looking for oil. In looking at the maps, the researchers were able to see that beneath the layers of silt and other assorted debris, was a lost land of sorts, one that had been pushed up by the Icelandic Plume, or expansion of the mantle due to the hot magma below.The images constructed were sharp enough to allow the researchers to identify ancient rivers and mountain peaks and even some fossils, all from some 56 million years ago. The images also suggest that the ocean floor rose in three distinct stages of about 200-400 m each, creating the island which they believe lasted for about a million years, before once again disappearing beneath the cold waters of the North Atlantic Sea. White describes the seascape as appearing for all the world like that of a modern landscape.The echo-technology used by the contractors involved releasing highly pressurized air beneath the surface of the sea, which produced sound waves capable of passing through the ocean floor sediment. When the sound waves eventually bounced back, they were captured by microphones dragged behind a boat and fed into a computer to produce the 3-D images.The initial research team followed up on the 3-D imagery by taking core samples, some of which contained pollen and coal, suggesting land-dwelling life once existed there. The Cambridge team also found fossils indicating there was also a marine environment at one time.The research team thinks that the now sunken landscape is part of a much bigger region that at one time merged with modern Scotland and may have reached all the way to Norway. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: New exploration shows parts of North Atlantic seabed were once above sea level (2011, July 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-exploration-north-atlantic-seabed-sea.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. UNH-NOAA ocean mapping expedition yields new insights into arctic depths More information: Transient convective uplift of an ancient buried landscape, Nature Geoscience (2011) doi:10.1038/ngeo1191AbstractSedimentary basins in the North Atlantic Ocean preserve a record of intermittent uplift during Cenozoic times. These variations in elevation are thought to result from temperature changes within the underlying Icelandic mantle plume. When parts of the European continental shelf were episodically lifted above sea level, new landscapes were carved by erosion, but these landscapes then subsided and were buried beneath marine sediments. Here, we use three-dimensional seismic data to reconstruct one of these ancient landscapes that formed off the northwest coast of Europe during the Palaeocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum. We identify a drainage network within the landscape and, by modelling the profiles of individual rivers within this network, we reconstruct the history of surface uplift. We show that the landscape was lifted above sea level in a series of three discrete steps of 200–400 m each. After about 1 million years of subaerial exposure, this landscape was reburied. We use the magnitude and duration of uplift to constrain the temperature and velocity of a mantle-plume anomaly that drove landscape formation. We conclude that pulses of hot, chemically depleted, mantle material spread out radially beneath the lithospheric plate at velocities of ~35 cm yr−1. Image (c) R A Hartley et al./Nature Geoscience (2011) doi:10.1038/ngeo1191 (PhysOrg.com) — Using data obtained from oil searching contractors, researchers have discovered that parts of what is now the ocean floor off the northern coast of Scotland, were at one time raised up enough by thermal expansion beneath to have jutted at least 1 kilometer above the sea. Nicky White, senior researcher from the University of Cambridge and his team explain what they’ve found in their paper published in Nature Geoscience.last_img read more

Chemists offer more evidence of RNA as the origin of life

first_img Citation: Chemists offer more evidence of RNA as the origin of life (2016, May 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-chemists-evidence-rna-life.html (Phys.org)—A team of chemists at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich has shown how the purines adenine and guanine can be synthesized easily and in reasonable yields, offering more evidence that RNA could have served as the origin of life on Earth. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes the process they took in looking for evidence that RNA could have been the first self-replicating molecule that eventually led to all life on our planet and what they found. Journal information: Science This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. For several years many scientists have supported the idea that life got its start on our planet due to a series of events that led to the creation of RNA molecules—it seems like a strong candidate because it is able to both store information and act as a catalyst. To bolster the theory, scientists have been trying to show under what conditions RNA might have come about based on the conditions that existed on early Earth. In the early going, researchers found it relatively easy to show how two of the four main building blocks in RNA, uracil and cytosine, could have come about, but showing how the other two, adenine and guanine, might have come about has been problematic. In this new effort the research team describes a scenario under with both might have come about given conditions at the time that life is believed to have got its start.The team started by extending prior research that had shown that a molecule called formamidopyrimidine can react under certain conditions to form purines—they discovered that adding acid to an amine (which the team showed could have come about very easily from plentiful carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen) allowed for a reaction that led to the formation of a purine and that it would easily bond with formic acid, which recent research has shown is plentiful on comets—that means it could have met with existing purines if a comet crashed into the planet at the right place. Once that happened, the resultant reactions would have led to forging bonds with sugars which would have resulted in the creation of large amounts of purines, including adenine and guanine—thus all of the necessary ingredients would have been in place for the creation of RNA molecules, setting the stage for the development of living organisms. This is a computer graphic of an RNA molecule. Credit: Richard Feldmann/Wikipediacenter_img © 2016 Phys.org Missing links brewed in primordial puddles? Explore further More information: S. Becker et al. A high-yielding, strictly regioselective prebiotic purine nucleoside formation pathway, Science (2016). DOI: 10.1126/science.aad2808AbstractThe origin of life is believed to have started with prebiotic molecules reacting along unidentified pathways to produce key molecules such as nucleosides. To date, a single prebiotic pathway to purine nucleosides had been proposed. It is considered to be inefficient due to missing regioselectivity and low yields. We report that the condensation of formamidopyrimidines (FaPys) with sugars provides the natural N-9 nucleosides with extreme regioselectivity and in good yields (60%). The FaPys are available from formic acid and aminopyrimidines, which are in turn available from prebiotic molecules that were also detected during the Rosetta comet mission. This nucleoside formation pathway can be fused to sugar-forming reactions to produce pentosides, providing a plausible scenario of how purine nucleosides may have formed under prebiotic conditions.last_img read more

Understanding how slow predators catch faster prey could improve drone tactics

first_img Journal information: New Journal of Physics (Phys.org)—Since a gazelle can run faster than a lion, how do lions ever catch gazelles? A new model of predator-prey interaction shows how groups of predators use collective chasing strategies, such as cornering and circling, to pursue and capture faster prey. Without this tactical collaboration, the predators would have no chance of catching these prey. Simulations of predators (blue dots) chasing a faster prey (red dot). Credit: Janosov et al. Published in New Journal of Physics. © 2017 Phys.org Modelling explains how hunters team up to catch faster prey Explore further In their model, the researchers also observed emergent behavior, which is behavior that appears only in groups. In particular, groups of predators often begin to encircle their prey, and this behavior arises directly from the chasing rules. In nature, it’s common for prey to sometimes run in a zigzag pattern to confuse the predator, and to eventually run directly away from the predator in a straight line. The researchers also observed these strategies in their model, and found that zigzagging is especially advantageous when the predators have a long delay in responding.In the future, the researchers expect that additional interesting results can be obtained by modifying the model, such as investigating situations with multiple fast prey and equipping predators and prey with machine learning algorithms. “Our major goal in this research was to gain a deeper understanding of the collective behavior of animals, to extend our knowledge on fundamental questions on animal behavior,” Janosov said. “However, given the fact that our research group is developing collective motion algorithms for our flock of quadrocopters, there are plenty of potential applications we could propose. For example, a group of tactical drones using smart encircling strategies could become even lifesaving in the case of terrorist attacks, when the goal is to capture terrorist flying vehicles, or chasing criminals in narrow, highly populated urban areas. “Besides these, our results could have potential applications even in the entertainment industry in developing field games, possibly combined with virtual reality tools, or by the streaming of popular sport events, especially those that are widely spread in space—for example, bike or car races.” The results are not only relevant for understanding wildlife, but also have potential applications for drone-flying strategies and in the entertainment industry.The researchers, Milán Janosov, Csaba Virágh, Gábor Vásárhelyi, and Tamás Vicsek at the MTA-ELTE Statistical and Biological Physics Research Group, Hungary, have published their paper on their new model of collective chasing strategies in a recent issue of the New Journal of Physics.”After many previous efforts, we managed to give a simple, yet surprisingly life-like explanation of how predator animals can form successful hunting packs, and by that drastically enhance their chances of being successful on a hunt,” Janosov told Phys.org. “This is particularly interesting because we managed to model these exceptionally complex systems—the hunting groups of large carnivores—in a simulation resembling realistic features of animal pursuits, such as encircling, optimal group size, and finite space, only by using a set of compact rules formulated as force-like interactions in physics.”Although there are other models that describe predator-prey interactions, the new model is different because of the large number of factors it accounts for, such as the prey’s panic threshold, the predator’s ability to predict the prey’s future position, and the interaction between multiple predators, within closed boundaries with realistic measures. All of these parameters contribute to making a more realistic model that accurately describes behaviors observed in nature by groups of predators such as lions, wolves, and coyotes.By running simulations and measuring the effectiveness of different combinations of parameter values, the researchers determined the optimal combinations that resulted in the most successful group chasing strategies. Among their results, they found that just one or two predators can never catch a faster prey, and that groups of three or more succeed only with certain collaborative strategies. More information: Milán Janosov et al. “Group chasing tactics: how to catch a faster prey.” New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/aa69e7 Play Credit: Video abstract, New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/aa69e7 The model revealed that three predators forms an optimal group when chasing in two dimensions (such as on land) in a confined space. In three dimensions (such as in the air or under water), chasing becomes more challenging, and groups of five are optimal. These group sizes are comparable to those observed in nature. Somewhat surprisingly, the researchers also found that an odd number of chasers does better than an even number, which is due to geometrical reasons: with an even number, it’s more likely that a gap remains between predators that allows the prey to escape. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Citation: Understanding how slow predators catch faster prey could improve drone tactics (2017, May 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-predators-faster-prey-drone-tactics.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Flexible color displays with microfluidics

first_img The method also deviates from existing techniques of liquid crystals or organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), which consume energy at the level of the light-emitting pixel. The technique houses a microfluidic water droplet train as a flexible, reflective display. The working principle of the system is based on a rotary liquid selector with suction-based negative pressure to drive the droplets in the intended direction and form a predetermined sign.Microchannels of the proposed device were fabricated with the flexible polymer, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a material with properties that include transparency under visible light and permeability to air. The authors used soft lithography and bonding techniques to create PDMS-PDMS microchannels with pixel patterns ranging from 400-800 μm in diameter and 50-200 μm in height. In the device architecture, the patterns were connected via linear channels of 100-200 μm in width. Since the material is permeable to air and gas soluble, a thin Parylene layer (500 nm thick) was deposited within the microchannels to prevent the leakage and evaporation of air and water. A new generation of LCD with higher efficiency, resolution and color performance , Applied Physics Letters Observing the flexibility, recovery and retention of the multicolored display within its original dimensions on microchannels of flexible PDMS. Credit: Microsystems and Nanoengineering, doi: 10.1038/s41378-018-0018-1 To fabricate an optimized pixel size, the authors devised a relationship between the microchannel geometry and water loss in order to maintain a specific volume of dyed water as droplets advanced in the device. The device design and optimization included measurements of the minimal differential pressure required to drive dyed water droplets through the microchannels. The pressure within the microfluidic device suction system was controlled with a computer-aided valve system, and the switch control was programmed using MATLAB. In addition, the capacity for color switching and droplet control was assessed at the level of the single pixel for optimized image display. The relationship between droplet position and the time of negative pressure applied was optimized to indicate that the device could be controlled at the level of the single pixel. The schematic principles of device design and fabrication: The proposed microfluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, using standard photolithography fabrication techniques to form pixel-patterned microchannels. The pressure inside the microfluidic device was regulated with a computer-controlled valve system composed of a solenoid valve, vacuum pump and air regulator. The switch control was programmed by MATLAB and gauge pressure controlled by the in-built regulator. Credit: Microsystems and Nanoengineering, doi: 10.1038/s41378-018-0018-1 Journal information: Nature Communications , Nature A new study published on Microsystems and Nanoengineering by Kazuhiro Kobayashi and Hiroaki Onoe details the development of a flexible and reflective multicolor display system that does not require continued energy supply for color retention. The idea aims to find futuristic applications with sustainable color displays and replace existing electronic display signs currently used for multicolor messages and images. While the concept originates from electronic paper or flexible electronics that look like print on paper (developed for smart wear), the proposed method simply relies on sequentially introduced colored water droplets and air pockets in a microfluidic device precisely fabricated on a flexible polymer to maintain stable bitmap images without energy consumption. © 2018 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img More information: Kazuhiro Kobayashi et al. Microfluidic-based flexible reflective multicolor display, Microsystems & Nanoengineering (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41378-018-0018-1Power-free poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices for gold nanoparticle-based DNA analysis dx.doi.org/10.1039%2Fb403930k, Hosokawa et al, 2004, Royal Society of Chemistry, Lab on a Chip.Two-dimensional flexible nanoelectronics, www.nature.com/articles/ncomms6678, Akinwande et al, Review, December 2014, Nature Communications.All-organic active matrix flexible display aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1 … 8213?journalCode=apl Zhou L et al, 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. Organic thin-film transistor-driven polymer-dispersed liquid crystal displays on flexible polymer substrates aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.1448659, Sheraw et al, 2002, Appl. Phys. Lett. PDMS-based micro PCR chip with Parylene coating iopscience.iop.org/article/10. … 60-1317/13/5/332/pdf, Shin et al, 2003, J. Micromech. Microeng. Electronic paper: flexible active-matrix electronic ink display www.nature.com/articles/423136a Chen, et al, Brief Communication, May 2003, Nature. Citation: Flexible color displays with microfluidics (2018, August 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-flexible-microfluidics.html Experimental results validated that the system could display multicolored reflective images and retain them without energy consumption as theorized. The images were durable while maintaining their position after pliable twisting, to indicate flexibility and recovery of the original multicolored framework. The scientists predict that such flexible and energy-less display systems may find innovative applications on robot skins, clothes and accessories in daily life in the future. In the study, a range of images were created in this way in zig-zag microchannels as proof of principle to test the proposed concept of flexible multicolor reflective displays. Color retention was enabled by stopping the suction system, during which the orientation of the display remained intact without energy supply. , Lab on a Chip The proof-of-principle of a three-color dot matrix a) multicolored stripe patterns (vertically and horizontally aligned) displayed on microchannels, b-c) the bitmap characters ‘A’ and ‘T’ visualized on the microfluidic-based reflective display, d-g) testing the flexibility of the display to indicate maintenance of the original framework for multicolored display retention. Credit: Microsystems and Nanoengineering, doi: 10.1038/s41378-018-0018-1 The fabricated device for color display a) Meandering microchannels with a 7×13 pixels (25 dpi) display. Inlet and outlet ports were connected to the liquid selector and suction system, b) microscopic images of the tear-drop shaped pixels that constitute the microchannels, the white dots on each pixel were caused by visible light illuminated on the device surface, c) cross-sectional view of the microchannel, a thin parylene film was deposited within the microchannel to prevent air leakage. Credit: Microsystems and Nanoengineering, doi: 10.1038/s41378-018-0018-1 Observing the relationship between the droplet position and the timing of negative pressure applied to control the position of droplets at the level of the single-pixel. Credit: Microsystems and Nanoengineering, doi: 10.1038/s41378-018-0018-1 Explore furtherlast_img read more

In Rural Utah Preventing Suicide Means Meetin

first_img https://ondemand.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2019/08/20190826_me_in_rural_utah_p… In Rural Utah, Preventing Suicide Means Meeting Gun Owners… by NPR News Erik Neumann 8.26.19 7:32am A gun show might not be the first place you would expect to talk about suicide prevention — especially in a place like rural northeast Utah, where firearms are deeply embedded in the local culture.But one Friday at the Vernal Gun & Knife Show, four women stood behind a folding table for the Northeastern Counseling Center with exactly that in mind.Amid a maze of tables displaying brightly varnished rifle stocks, shotguns and the occasional AR-15 assault-style rifle, they waited, ready to talk with show attendees.”Lethal access to lethal means makes a difference. Suicide attempts by any other means are less lethal,” says one of the women, Robin Hatch, a prevention coordinator with Northeastern Counseling for nearly 23 years.Utah has one of the highest rates of death by suicide in the U.S. And 85% of firearm deaths in the state are suicides. According to Utah’s health department, suicide rates can vary widely depending on where you are. For example, the suicide rate in northeast Utah is 58% higher than the rest of the state.Suicide by gun is a particular problem: The rate in rural areas is double that in urban areas, according to state officials.A major factor is the easy access to firearms in Utah — and the grim fact that suicide attempts involving guns have a higher mortality rate than by other means.This was the first time Hatch and her colleagues at Northeastern Counseling were doing outreach at a gun show.As the auditorium filled with firearm sellers and hunters, the counselors stacked their folding tables with neat piles of free cable locks that thread into a gun to prevent rounds from being loaded, and water-resistant gun socks screen-printed on the outside with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number.The idea behind distributing both devices is to slow a person down during a moment of crisis. “Anything that we can do to get people off track a little bit, thinking something different,” Hatch explains. “We believe that will help make a difference in our suicide rates.”Unpredictable employment adds stressThe northeast corner of Utah is home to oil and gas fields, cattle ranches and the Uintah and Ouray Reservation.Health experts say factors contributing to the high suicide rates in the area include limited access to mental health services in rural communities and the unpredictability of the ranching and oil and gas industries. The boom-bust cycles, along with physical and mental stress, take a toll on workers.”Injuries and accidents, keeping your job, having a job tomorrow. It’s so up and down,” says Val Middleton, a former oil and gas safety instructor at Uintah Basin Technical College in Vernal. “The guys don’t eat right typically. No exercise, hard work, long hours, no sleep. That’s what adds up. The divorce rate is high, really high. The family life is low.”Add high gun ownership and the risks are increased.Dee Cairoli is a pastor at Roosevelt Christian Assembly in a neighboring town. He also works part time as an NRA concealed-carry handgun instructor. When hosting classes, Cairoli explains how gun owners can intervene if another gun owner shows signs of a mental health crisis.”I’ve done it a couple of times as a pastor where I’ve gone to somebody’s house and said, ‘Look, maybe you need to listen to me for a minute. I know what I’m talking about. I promise I’ll keep it in my [gun] safe, but let me have your gun.’ “Cairoli speaks with authority. When he was 15, his father killed himself with a gun.”It was very tragic, but I never hated the gun. I never blamed the gun. I knew that it was just his desperate moment and that he had just chosen that,” Cairoli says.He believes that personal tragedy, along with the credibility he brings as a gun user and local pastor, allows people in crisis to trust him.Not Just A Rural IssueHow to talk about suicide with guns isn’t just an issue in rural parts of Utah. It’s a topic that state Rep. Steve Eliason of Sandy, a suburban city near Salt Lake, also tackles. Eliason has sponsored legislation focused on firearms, suicide prevention and mental health services. It is personal for him, too.”I’ve lost three extended family members to suicide. All firearm suicides. Young men,” Eliason says.This year, he worked on bills to fund firearm safety and suicide prevention programs, supply gun locks, create new mental health treatment programs and expand crisis response in rural Utah.Eliason describes these issues as nonpartisan, but with Utah’s proud gun culture, he’s also careful with his approach. He describes advice he got from a politically liberal friend in public health about how to bring together opposing perspectives about firearms.”Obviously, there’s kind of two schools of thought on firearms,” he says. “Those two schools of thought, if they were circles, they would overlap into a small oval — that oval is the culture of safety. And she says, ‘I would recommend that you dwell within that oval.’ That’s what I’ve tried to do.”That perspective led to the Utah legislature appropriating money to fund a study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in consultation with the Utah Shooting Sports Council. That study spurred discussions about the problem of firearms and suicide and formed the basis of at least one of Eliason’s 2019 bills, to expand access to gun locks.Like Eliason’s work at the state policy level, Hatch’s suicide prevention work in her community depends on relationships and trust.Hatch’s table at the gun show was less busy than others. But the women gave out hundreds of gun locks and gun socks over the course of the day. And attendees said having them there was a fitting way to bring up the subject of suicide and firearms.”You need to know your community, and you need to address it in a way that your community will accept it,” Hatch says.This story comes from NPR’s reporting partnership with KUER and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.last_img read more

Odisha goes Egyptian

Two diametrically opposite places – ancient Odisha and Egypt – gave Anupama Dayal the idea behind her collection that saw a mix and match between the two places. So her ensembles were called Giza dress [a halter necked long wrap dress with little colourful wheels], Cuttack tunic [a scarlet Dupion fitted dress with side slits and ikkat prints], Ra dress [long silk dress] and Jagannath sari [a graphic black and white printed red chanderi sari with choli].

Play it on loop

first_img‘Female Dj’s are no dolly birds!’ says DJane July Loop. Before this beauty hits Zerzura on 4 May, she gets candid with Millennium Post. Read on…Tell us a bit about yourself. Where did you start from?I am from Ukraine and working as a DJ from past 4 and a half years and have travelled across the world for work. I have played in countries like Switzerland, Italy, Poland, China, Korea, Turkey, Egypt and many more. I started my career as a DJ from my own city – Ukraine.   Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Where did the interest in music come in and the plans to become a DJ and go behind the console?I love listening to music and doing mixing. I was crazy about rock music since I was in my teens. I used to party a lot with my friends. One of my DJ friends taught me how to play, but at that time it was just a hobby. But now music has become a part of my life and I can’t live without music and crazy people on the dance floor.Tell us about what made it for you. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixMy never-ending love for music and the crazy grooving people on the dance floor. I mark a success for myself when I make the entire crowd in the venue dance like crazy on the beats I play.  I will always remember the big artists I have worked with like Tara Mcdonald, Armin van Buuren, Dj Ralvero, Ottawan etc. They really helped me to reach where I have.     Tell us about making it big – was it a long journey and a tough struggle?In the beginning of my career I used to play in small parties, usually a pre-party.  It wasn’t a long journey for me because I got my first break to work with a well known DJ from London. It was my first assignment abroad in Istanbul. I played warm up for him. After the show we worked together for almost one month and I at that moment understood what is really to be a DJ. Is it harder to be a female DJ as compared to your male counterparts?Female DJ’s were largely regarded as a gimmick, a ‘dolly bird’  to gaze at and to be taken seriously, as someone who might actually know how to present music, was almost an impossibility. People in various countries have different mindsets.  Some people don’t believe that a female DJ can play and take a party on a high. They look at me or my photo and think I am just a model standing near the console. I love facing the challenges and with these people I love breaking of that stereotype thoughts. Usually, after my party, people come to me and say: Wow you really can play!!! What are the essential ingredients needed to become a DJ?You should love music and have an ability of sensing the crowd’s music requirements. Sometimes the taste of the crowd is far different from yours, at that moment you need to change your preferences and need to adapt according to the crowd.Is this your first visit to India? What sort of reaction are you expecting from Delhi?It is my third trip to India. I have heard that the Delhi crowd is the most energetic crowd. I am expecting a lot from the Delhiites. I want to drive my crowd crazy with my beats. Earlier Delhi crowd was only open to Bollywood and commercial music. But now with the increase of music knowledge among Delhiites the preferences has been changed. People are better informed now and they also enjoy all the genres of music. Tell us what tops your playlist right now – the top tracks on it…The top tracks on my playlists are:  Baauer – Harlem Shake; Macklemore & Ryan Lewis – Thrift Shop; Pitbull and Christina Aguilera – Feel This Moment.last_img read more

CRYing need to get them to school

first_imgChild Rights and You, India’s leading Child 30th rights NGO and its alliance, APR – Alliance for People’s Rights, organised a day long theatre festival in the capital.This was an open forum for children to speak out on issues that affect them the most in school. Shiksha Hamara Haq theme of the festival amplified the voices of more than 50 children between ages 6-14 from different parts of city. Corporal punishment and discrimination, barriers in education due to lack of infrastructure, positive impact of RTE Act are the issues which the festival addressed. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Padhna isi ka naam hai, Dhoondte reh jaoge, Thoda hai thode kee zarurat hai, were three plays where children showcased what they have observed as issues of basic infrastructure in their school, hygiene and access to playgrounds. The theatre festival was followed up by a panel discussion on the status of education in Delhi. Themes of the discussion were, ensuring enrolment of all children between 6-14 years in school, as per the current provisions of RTE Act, 2009, ensuring that no child is subjected to any kind of corporal punishment of any nature- physical or mental, To ensure ‘compulsory education’ for all children through availability of a neighbourhood school with proper infrastructure.last_img read more

Thai high in Delhi

first_imgA five-day event Thailand Trade Exhibition 2014 has been organised in the Capital by Department of International Trade Promotion Thailand (DITP) that started off on 3 September at DLF Place Saket. The show provides a trade opportunity for both the countries. The event was inaugurated by Chalit Manityakul Ambassador, Royal Thai Embassy. It showcases rich plethora of Thai activities and products like cultural dance, home decorative, gem and jewellery, educational toys, health and beauty and flowers.Chalit Manityakul said, ‘We are glad to organise this fair.as it has given us a great opportunity to showcase our exciting range of products to discerning buyers and sellers. With this platform, we hope to create more awareness amongst our target audiences and benefit from B2B interactions and meetings as well’.last_img read more

A walk through State Archaeological Museum

first_imgKolkata: The State Archaeological Museum takes you on a journey of the artistic history of Bengal. Spread across two floors, the seven galleries of the museum display innumerable artifacts that were a part of the different eras of Bengal.The first gallery displays ancient pieces of terracotta sculptures, pre-historic stones and pictures of excavations carried out by the archaeological survey team, placed in proper order and beautifully presented. The art gallery right next to the first one is a splendid collection of Bengali artistic talent and the styles they preferred in different eras. The colorful paintings of old women, Gods and Goddesses, court proceedings, make up the initial part of the gallery. Towards the end is the portrayal of the Chokkhudan ceremony performed by Lord Rama as an appeasement to Goddess Durga, through the use of a number of paintings, all kept in order of their action. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe first floor houses a medium sized sculpted Goddess Durga along with various other statues and sculptures portraying the rich sculpting history that existed in this state. The sculpture gallery holds around ten terracotta figurines of Lord Surya and Lord Vishnu, with a central shelf for Goddessess like Saraswati and Kali. The sculptures are of different sizes, some eroded and some reconstructed. The magnificence and details that the sculptures hold, till this date, is beyond expression. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedA huge model of a Buddhist monastery, holding similarities with the Nalanda University ruins in Bihar, is on display as at the gallery of excavations. The Chandraketu Garh ruins with a display of the huge carved out walls and pillars, along with small metal weapons that were found in those areas, are a major attraction of this museum. The journey ends with the small room of metal artifacts collected through eras, putting weapons and idols on display. The State Archaeological Museum fills one’s heart with rich abundance of art and appreciation for the beauty of the State we reside in.last_img read more

Mother of all battles

first_imgWhen India play Pakistan at the World Cup, it’s no cliche that both captains say they’re not looking beyond their first game of the tournament. World Cup organisers are tipping Indo-Pak clash to draw the biggest television audience when the teams meet in Adelaide on Sunday in the opening Pool B clash.The politically uneasy neighbours also have a long rivalry on the cricket field, with Pakistan leading overall in their limited-overs meetings. But defending champion India have a 100 per cent record so far after five World Cup clashes. The two teams first locked horns in 1992, also the last time the World Cup was jointly staged by Australia and New Zealand, and the atmosphere was intense and couldn’t be compared with any other game. Also Read – Mahavir Phogat plans sports complex in native villageIn his autobiography Playing It My Way,  which was released last year, Tendulkar has recalled a 2003 World Cup match against Pakistan, saying he’d waited for the showdown for a full year after the schedule was unveiled and couldn’t sleep for several nights before the match. “The nation would brook no failure and for many of our fans this was the true final. It really did not matter to them what happened in the rest of the tournament,” wrote Tendulkar. Also Read – Ballon d’Or: A trophy that evaded legends of the gameIndia won that match by six wickets but lost the final to Australia. India got a measure of revenge by beating Australia in the quarterfinals in 2011, then held of Pakistan in the semifinal in Mohali before beating Sri Lanka in the final at Mumbai, where Tendulkar finally added the World Cup crown to his decorated hat in his sixth attempt.India’s dominance in World Cup matches against Pakistan has confounded critics. The two countries did not meet in the first four editions of the World Cup. In 1992, at the Sydney Cricket Ground, an 18-year-old Tendulkar scored a half-century to propel India to a 43-run win. Though Pakistan lost that match, it went on to win the title. Tendulkar, who scored a record 2,278 runs in 45 World Cup matches, is the only common denominator in those results, averaging 78 and posting three half-centuries, including a high of 98 in that 2003 match. But he retired in 2013, leaving India skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni and the likes of Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma to continue the legacy. Both teams have been conscious to emphasise the rivalry between players is on the field, and there’s no animosity outside the boundary. Yet both teams were publicly silent, holding closed practice sessions as fans from  both sides started flooding into Adelaide. Hotels and flights on the weekend were fully booked, and anticipation was growing. Commenting on Sunday’s match, Mohinder Amarnath, hero of the 1983 World Cup-winning side, said, “There is not much of a difference between the two teams. Both have good individual players but I will go with the record. India has always done and played well against Pakistan in World Cup. But if India wins this time, it will be because of their batting and not bowling.”Interestingly, this will be India’s first World Cup fixture against Pakistan which will not feature Sachin Tendulkar. “Tendulkar has been a great player but every player has to retire and you can’t get a replacement of his calibre anywhere. Not only him but players like Rahul Dravid, Virender Sehwag, VVS Laxman, Yuvraj Singh are irreplaceable,” added Amarnath, who was man-of-the-series during India’s World Cup triumph in 1983.Four years back in Mohali, Tendulkar (85) again rose to the occasion in a crunch semifinal tie and helped India to a fighting total of 260/9. The home team was well placed to post a superior total but was restricted by left-arm pacer Wahab Riaz (5/46). Pakistan’s response was typical, a strong start followed by a middle-order failure. The onus fell on the reliable Misbah-ul-Haq (56) to pull Pakistan through but he ran out of partners and ultimately was the last person to be dismissed.No Tendulkar gives Pakistan World Cup hopeIndia go into the World Cup without the reassuring presence of retired batting superstar Sachin Tendulkar for the first time since 1992, which surely must bring relief to arch-rivals Pakistan. Pakistan have lost all their five World Cup meetings against India and Tendulkar, who featured in all of them, proved a stumbling block on at least four occasions. India and Pakistan face each other in a high-voltage clash at the Adelaide Oval on Sunday to kickstart their campaigns in the 2015 edition of cricket’s showpiece event. Tendulkar, who retired in 2013 as the world’s leading run-getter in both Test and one-day cricket, added colour to the World Cup, both literally and metaphorically. Coloured clothing was introduced to the World Cup when Tendulkar made his tournament debut in Australia and New Zealand in 1992 after the first four editions were played in whites. Over the next six editions, the prolific Mumbaikar scored more runs (2,278) and centuries (six) than any other batsman in the tournament, ending his World Cup career with a creditable average of 56.95. Indian fans hold a placard for Sachin Tendulkar, who has scored more World Cup runs and centuries than any other player. Tendulkar often spoke of his dream of winning the World Cup for India, saying he was inspired as a 10-year-old by the country’s triumph in the 1983 editon when Kapil Dev’s men stunned favourites West Indies at Lord’s. He saw action from close quarters as a ball boy at Mumbai’s Wankhede stadium when India co-hosted the World Cup with Pakistan in 1987, two years before he burst on the world scene as a 16-year-old. Tendulkar was the tournament’s leading scorer when India made the semifinal in 1996 and the final in 2003 before he realised his dream when Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s side won back the title on a memorable night in Mumbai on April 2, 2011.Former greats favour IndiaLegendary cricketers Sunil Gavaskar and Ian Chappell tipped India as favourites in their much anticipated World Cup clash against Pakistan, saying past history and better acclimatisation to Australian conditions could tilt the balance in favour of the defending champions. Both Gavaskar and Chappell said Pakistan are unlikely to break their World Cup jinx this time also, although both sides go into the showpiece event as struggling teams. “Both teams are going into the World Cup not in great touch. Pakistan are also struggling as they had lost to New Zealand recently, it could be even stevens. But I think India will start as slight favourites because of their past records,” Gavaskar said.He said the absence of off-spinner Saeed Ajmal will have a huge impact on the 1992 champions. “Without a doubt, Ajmal was half the Pakistan side and they will be hit hard without him. He is a wicket-taking and a containing bowler. He is just like Muttiah Muralitharan in his prime days in the Sri Lankan side,” the former Indian captain said. “They (Pakistan) won the World Cup in 1992 but at that time they had so many match-winners in Imran Khan, Javed Miandad, Wasim Akram, Inzamam-ul-Haq. They don’t have those match-winners in the current team. The loss of Junaid Khan is also a big blow for them. India have been playing in Australia for the past two months and they have acclimatised more to the conditions than  the Pakistanis,” Chappell said.last_img read more

Setting the stage

first_imgBringing together the best of Indian theatre from the year gone by, the Mahindra Excellence in Theatre Awards and Festival (META) is staging some exceptional plays in the Capital at LTG Auditorium and Kamani Auditorium. The Festival is on till March 26.Dhou… The Wave by the nominated in the Best Director, Best Innovative Sound Design, Best Stage Design, Best Costume Design, Best Choreography, Best Actor in Supporting Role(Female), Best Ensemble category was performed on March 23. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Produced by Purbaranga and directed by Gunakar Dev Goswami,  Dhou, the wave is a powerful story of a lonely, wise old fisherman who conquers a magnificent fish, endures the heart breaking loss of it and rises gallantly above his defeat. Kaumudi, nominated in categories such as Best Director, Best Actor in a Lead Role (Male), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Male), Best Original Script, Best Ensemble was about a rite of passage. Kaumudi has been inspired by two texts: Anand’s Malayalam novel Vyasam Vigneswaram and Jorge Luis Borges’ essay Blindness. Using the ‘moonlit timeless night’ when Krishna delivers his sermon to Arjuna as its central trope, this play explores the dynamics between an estranged father-son duo who play Eklavya’s ghost and Abhimanyu respectively, in a theatre, in late 1960’s Allahabad. The father, Satyasheel, who is a great actor and has almost lost his sight, is at his final three performances. Thus son, Paritosh, who grew up with the void of not having a father by his side, has come to challenge not only the father but also his entire school of thought. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixKaumudi is hinged on three central questions: Whose life is more valuable, an older or a younger person’s? Is personal ethic more important than public ethic? Does art have an unction, and do we make art or does art make us? It also holds up a mirror to it and questions theatre: Matthi, performed on March 24 is nominated in the Best Director, Best Stage Design, Best Light Design, Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Female), Best Original Script, Best Ensemble, Best Choreography categories.  Produced by Malayalakalanilayam and directed by Jino Joseph the play travels through the Kerala during 1970 – 80s with its political, social and cultural rigor and people’s collective movements. It portrays its cultural deterioration with migrant labors and the shift in the ideology and social harmony. Another play screened on March 24 was Still and Still Moving at the Kamani Auditorium Time. Nominated for Best Director, Best Original Script, Best Actor in a lead Role (Male), Best Light Design, the play is produced by Tadpole Repertory and directed directed by Neel Chaudhari.Still and Still Moving is set in North Delhi and Gurgaon. It is the story of Partho, a reclusive writer in his forties, and Adil, a young college student. Their fractured love affair plays out across two poles of a changing metropolis, punctuated by observations on the interactions of men on the Delhi Metro.last_img read more

All aspects to be probed Mamata

first_imgKolkata: Three days after the Kazipara blast killed an eight-year-old boy, chief minister Mamata Banerjee broke her public silence on the incident and said the CID had been asked to probe all aspects of the tragedy and nab those responsible. In response to a question on Tuesday’s blast, Mamata expressed her confidence in the CID’s capability of investigating it. “It is a serious matter, a little child died,” she said at a news conference on Friday evening, three days after some senior leaders of her party issued statements accusing the BJP-RSS camp of having engineered the blast. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “The CID has been given charge of the investigation. We expect the CID to look into every aspect and take the accused into custody soon.” The chief minister’s comment followed a meeting of the core committee of Trinamul at the party’s headquarters. The CID has preliminarily deduced that an eight-inch iron pipe of four-inch diameter and one-mm thickness was used to make the bomb. (With inputs from The Telegraph)last_img read more

Echoing Silence

first_imgIt is often said that photography is about capturing souls and not smiles. “We are one!” believes Italian artiste, Attilio Tripodi who makes one introspect and visualize landscapes and human emotions in a new way as one takes a walk through his photography exhibition titled, ‘Temporary Solitudes’ at Indian International Centre (IIC) fromJuly 6-16, 11 am to 7pm in the national Capital.“We share our lives with those around us, through our thoughts, actions and emotions as human nature drives us to be sociable. We are connected to each other. We have more or less consolidated our material reality, but we are not often aware of our inner spiritual nature or worse, we deny it,” says Tripodi pointing towards one of his captures. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ One would witness lines, colours and graphic elements synced in such a way that enhances the ability of an image to communicate. There are around 50 photographs captured in different countries. Also, you will mark only one person in every picture with prevailing landscapes and various angles to rouse emotions.Elaborating on the exhibition…‘Temporary Solitudes’ is my humble gaze of a fragment of humanity. I feel that I am a part of it. I am conscious of the invisible thread that connects the whole of humanity, and that whenever a person gets in the way of its evolution, the benefit is collective.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixI do not wish to disseminate any message but only interpret things and sounds that surround me with a tool called photography. While selecting images for the exhibition, I preferred the ones that matched my aesthetic sense – lines, shapes, and textures can be seen in all my photos.Inspired by human landscapesI always prefer ‘human landscapes’ in my photographs, an innate vision. I like to photograph people immersed in their daily lives, as I too am a part of it and especially because in my journey of inner and spiritual growth, I have learned that we are all connected to each other. I imagined that the protagonists of my photos deliberately seek the solitude required to create a contact with one’s own soul, a necessary prelude to begin a process of growth of evolution. On capturing emotions…Capturing expressions, joy, smiles, awkwardness, signs of aging that draw and redraw faces of different people excite me. I love watching people and capturing them. It paves a way to see myself, through this endless game of mirrors that is life.The journeyIt took me a year and a half to focus on this concept. The images came in a spontaneous and natural way. There were no such challenges, everything just fell in place. I also found some photos taken a few years ago that very well amalgamated with the other photos of the collection as they in sync with its aesthetic expression.Black and white huesMy photos usually express liveliness through colours. For ‘Temporary Solitudes’, I preferred using monochrome as it connects to the theme which is meditative and intimate. The images express a feeling of vitality which unites them, that perhaps have a tinge of melancholy but never sad. I preferred minimal shots without any disturbing elements to accentuate the introspective aspect.Art is never static It is not very different from my previous works. As the Talmud (central text of Rabbinic Judaism) states, “We do not see things as they are, but we see things as we are,” I believe it affirms the uniqueness of each person, despite the similarities. Currently, I’m working on a completely different collection, dedicated to symbols and contradictions of human nature, without moralizing or judging, with a touch of vibrant creativity. Photography is an art and art is a dynamic concept, always moving, never static.last_img read more

Bookworms are usually friendlier

first_imgIn some good news for bookworms, scientists have found that people who regularly read fiction novels are more likely to be friendly, well-behaved and sympathetic towards others.Those who prefer watching television over reading are less sociable, according to the study. Those who like reading of drama and romance novels were best able to understand other people, while those who preferred experimental books showed more positive social behaviour and ability to see things from different perspectives. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”The findings support previous evidence that exposure to fiction relates to a range of empathetic abilities,” said Rose Turner, from Kingston University in the UK.Researchers at Kingston University questioned 123 people on their preferences for books, TV and plays.The volunteers were then tested on their interpersonal skills and prosocial behaviour – such as whether they considered other’s feelings, whether they could see things from different points of view and whether they acted to help others. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveResearchers found people who preferred reading novels were more likely to show positive social behaviour and be able to empathise with others.However, those who preferred watching TV did not have the same ability to empathise and were more likely to show antisocial behaviour.Comedy fans scored the highest for being able to relate to others, The Sun reported.Researchers suggest that this could be because reading books allow people to see things from other’s points of view, which makes them better able to understand others.”All forms of fiction are not equal. Associations between empathetic skills, media and genre diverge,” said Turner.”Engaging with fictional prose and comedy in particular could be key to enhancing people’s empathetic abilities,” she said.last_img read more

All govt hospitals medical colleges set to introduce online OPD booking

first_imgKolkata: All government hospitals and medical colleges in the city and the districts will soon implement online booking system for the Outpatient Departments (OPDs) to reduce the long queues which are often found inside the hospital premises.A centralised platform would soon be made functional so that patients from various parts of the state can visit the portal for booking tickets for the OPDs in any of the government hospitals and medical colleges. One of the main objectives of the initiative is to provide patients hassle-free treatment. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseIt may be mentioned that a large number of patients from various parts of the state visit various OPDs in government hospitals on a regular basis. As a result, the patients often have to stand in long queues before getting a chance to consult a doctor. The online ticket booking system has already been introduced on an experimental basis at SSKM Hospital, where people can book their tickets by logging onto the Health department’s website www.wbhealth.gov.in before visiting the hospital. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe state Health department is now planning to introduce a new system, where ticket booking for all OPDs of government hospitals and medical colleges can be brought under one umbrella. According to Health department sources there will be separate windows inside the ticket-booking portal, which will address the different needs of patients across the state. According to a senior Health department official, the patients will be able to book their ticket seven days prior to the date of visit. They won’t have to pay any fees for availing the online service. But in case of a patient visiting the hospital OPD for booking a ticket, he/she has to pay Rs 2 for buying a ticket. There will be separate options for different hospitals and medical colleges. The patients will get to know the details about the doctors of a department as well. They will also be able to register their preferences while booking a ticket. The patients will have to get a printed copy of the ticket once they successfully complete the process online. At the time of hospital visit, the patients will have to submit the printed copy at the designated counters of the hospital.last_img read more

8th Theatre Olympics to take Indian culture to the world

first_imgImprinting its name in the global theatre map, India recently threw the floor open to the 8th Theatre Olympics, the largest theatre festival in the world. The event is being hosted for the first time in India by the National School of Drama, under the aegis of Ministry of Culture, Government of India. The 51-day-long nationwide theatre extravaganza was inaugurated by the Vice President of India, Venkaiah Naidu, on February 17, at the majestic Red Fort. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfDr Mahesh Sharma, Union Minister of State for Culture (IC), and Theodoros Terzopoulos, Chairman of International Committee of Theatre Olympics, marked their presence as the guests of honour.Among the other esteemed guests was the Secretary, Ministry of Culture, Raghvendra Singh, Artistic Director of 8th Theatre Olympics, Ratan Thiyam, and Acting Chairman of NSD Society, Dr. Arjun Deo Charan, and Director of NSD Professor Waman Kendre, who along with many other dignitaries, members of International theatre fraternity and hundreds of people, witnessed another history in making at the lawns of the 17th century Mughal era fort. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”The 8th Theatre Olympics will take Indian culture and heritage to the world and bring the world to us. Art has the power to unite people across the globe. India believes in the culture of Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam which means the entire universe is one, which is an integral part of the Indian cultural and theatrical tradition,” said Venkaiah Naidu.Speaking on the occasion Mahesh Sharma stated, “Art gives the message of togetherness, brotherhood, and friendship, and portrays social issues to convey the message to common people. We have a rich and diverse theatre tradition since ancient times and I hope this Olympiad would bring people together to share and celebrate the unparallel bonding of artist fraternity.” A spectacular musical treat titled ‘Geet Rang’ fascinated the audience at the inaugural ceremony. The programme presented a bouquet of selected songs from different theatre forms, traditions, productions, and campaigns in India that epitomises importance of music in drama and music as a means to elevate, purify and enlighten human beings.Voicing his opinion on the occasion, Theodoros Terzopoulos, Chairman of International Committee of Theatre Olympics said, “Through the 8th Theatre Olympics, we meet the rich theatrical tradition of India and we encourage the articulation of a free and collective voice which will defend the value of the theatre tradition, research, and experimentation.”Raghvendra Singh, Secretary, Ministry of Culture, however, feels that the event is bound to take the national theatre to another pedestal.Towards the end, Dr Arjun Deo Charan, Acting Chairman of National School of Drama Society thanked all the theatre enthusiasts and experts for coming to the inauguration ceremony. Speaking further, she said, “Let us form a world where the boundaries between individual and communities are overlapped, obfuscated, and are mutually agreeable to exchange one. Long live theatre.”The theme of this edition of Theatre Olympics is “Flag of Friendship” and will bring together over 25,000 artists under one roof. The event will stage 450 shows from more than 30 countries performed across 17 cities, enthralling the audience for 51 consecutive days. Plays will be performed at Agartala, Ahmedabad, Bengaluru, Bhopal, Bhubaneswar, Chandigarh, Chennai, Delhi, Guwahati, Imphal, Jaipur, Jammu, Kolkata, Mumbai, Patna, Thiruvananthapuram and Varanasi during the festival. Besides, the Theatre Olympics will include 600 ambiance performances and 250 youth forum shows alongside thespians from 30 nations.The festival will conclude on April 8, 2018, with a grand ceremony at the iconic Gateway of India in Mumbai.last_img read more

Bhatpara bypolls marred by violence narrow escape for Madan Mitra

first_imgKolkata: Amid violent clashes between workers of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and Trinamool Congress, with hurling of bombs and ransacking of two police vehicles, the Bhatpara Assembly constituency turned into a battleground during the by-polls on Sunday.Three persons have been injured in the violence with 18 persons being arrested so far. The by-polls were necessitated after Arjun Singh, who defected to the BJP from Trinamool Congress, resigned as Bhatpara’s MLA to contest the Lok Sabha polls. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataMadan Mitra, the Trinamool candidate in Bhatpara constituency, alleged that Arjun Singh had resorted to violence as he knows that BJP will lose the by-election. The Election Commission has already sought a report on the violence. According to sources, Mitra on Sunday visited the polling booths one after another and around 12 pm while he was present at Kankinara High School, he saw that Central Force personnel were not checking the identity of the persons entering the polling booths. When he reportedly asked the jawans why was this happening, a heated exchange broke out. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateMitra alleged that BJP had arranged outsiders to cast false votes in favour of the candidates. Significantly in the Bhatpara by-election, BJP leader Arjun Singh’s son Pawan is contesting against Mitra. “Several persons could be seen entering polling premises wearing half pants. No police personnel or Central Force jawans were seen doing their duties. When I asked them about why they were not checking the identities of the voters, I was confronted,” said Mitra. Sources informed that after visiting Kankinara High School, when Mitra was on his way to another booth at Kantapukur area, several miscreants allegedly backed by the BJP hurled bombs targeting his car. But no harm was done as he immediately turned his car and left the area. Later, a Trinamool party office was allegedly set on fire by the BJP workers. As the situation worsened, the Central Force jawans lathi-charged to disperse the mob. There were attempts to reportedly snatch firearm from a jawan as well. Later, Commissioner of Police (CP), Barrackpore, Sunil Kumar Choudhary went to Kantapukur in Kankinara along with the Rapid Action Force (RAF). “We have asked for a factual report from the district administration,” Additional Chief Electoral Officer Sanjay Basu said. It is alleged that BJP has used the non-Bengali people who used to work in the jute mills that have been shut down for the past few years. Those jobless people have joined the BJP and are working as musclemen for the saffron party. In the afternoon at around 4 pm, Arjun went to the spot and alleged that Mitra was trying to create problems in the area. Condemning the violence in Kankinara, Trinamool spokesperson Derek O’Brien issued a media statement where he also alleged that the Central Forces are doing as they have been instructed by the BJP. In the statement he said: “Central forces, taking orders from BJP, mercilessly beating up citizens and Trinamool workers. Bombs hurled, open fire on citizens. BJP is resorting to high level of violence in the Bhatpara Assembly by-poll. This is dangerous for democracy. Goons of Arjun Singh have hurled bombs and even attacked the Trinamool candidate Madan Mitra.”last_img read more

NH10 opens for Sikkimbound traffic rain affects NH55

first_imgDarjeeling: With 8 days of incessant rainfall, the Kurseong Darjeeling stretch of the National Highway 55 has been affected. However, the National Highway 10 to Sikkim opened up on Friday evening.Meanwhile, a land slip occurred below the Thoteykhola culvert on National Highway 10 at Tung around 8 km from Kurseong. The culvert has stated sinking as a result. Heavy vehicles have been stopped from plying owing to this and the road is open to one-way traffic for light vehicles. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataVehicles plying from Darjeeling to Kurseong are taking a detour via Dilaram, Bagora, Chimney and then to Zero Point, Kurseong. From Kurseong to Darjeeling, light vehicles are plying through Tung. Debris was cleared at Setijhora, opening up NH-10 to Sikkim to vehicular traffic at around 6:30 pm. The NH-10 had been closed down since Wednesday afternoon. The Chief Minister of Sikkim Prem Singh Tamang had to take a detour via Darjeeling while returning to Sikkim on Friday afternoon. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateTwo detours were open for vehicles plying to Siliguri from Sikkim and Kalimpong before NH-10 opened up. The routes are Kalimpong-Teesta Bazar-Peshok-Jorebungalow-Kurseong-Siliguri and Kalimpong-Algarah-Lava-Gorubathan (Pandara More)–Damdim–Odlabari-Mongpong-Coronation Bridge-Sevok-Siliguri. A Sikkim vehicle plying from Rongpu via Birikdanra, Lanku to Siliguri met with an accident at 3:30 pm in Birikdanra. There were 8 persons in the vehicle, including the driver. The condition of 3 is reported to be critical. All were taken to Rambi primary health centre, from where the 3 were referred to Siliguri. Meanwhile the body of Aman Garg was fished out of River Teesta at Gajoldoba in Jalpaiguri district.last_img read more