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Modi Oli jointly inaugurate petroleum products pipeline

first_imgNew Delhi: To stengthen bilateral relations between India and Nepal, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Nepal’s Prime Minister K. P. Sharma Oli on Tuesday inaugurated South Asia’s first cross-border petroleum products pipeline which will provide cleaner petroleum products at an affordable cost to the people of Nepal. The 69 km-long Motihari-Amlekhgunj oil pipeline was inaugurated by the two leaders via a video link from their respective capitals. The pipeline was built in just little over a year at the cost of Rs 350 crore, entirely borne by the Indian oil Corporation, an Indian Public Sector Undertaking (PSU). Modi expressed confidence that bilateral relations between India and Nepal will continue to further deepen and expand across diverse sectors. Oli extended an invitation to the Modi to visit Nepal. Modi accepted the proposal.last_img read more

More Zika for Grand Turk

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppGrand Turk, TCI, January 9, 2017 –  Grand Turk sees cases of Zika virus surge as the Ministry of Health gives an update on recorded cases of the mosquito borne, sexually transmitted disease.Just days into the New Year, the public learned that there are eight new cases of Zika for the TCI, bringing the national total of on record cases to 24.   Seven of those eight cases were found in Grand Turk; the Capital and the island which hosts major cruise liners and thousands of tourists per day.  It is believed the rainy season is responsible in part for the new cases from October 14 through December 7, 2016.The ‘tip of the iceberg effect’ must be ever mindful, as Zika has the uniqueness of being asymptomatic, meaning some people do not even know that they have it, therefore the true number of cases will likely never be known in any society.Go to MagneticMediaTV.com for the tips and advice from the Ministry of Health on how to be Zika free. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:center_img #MagneticNewsMedia#MorezikeforGrandTurklast_img read more

Sekiro and difficulty Ignore the gatekeeping anyone can play this gem

first_img Tags 7 Comments Activision I’m currently playing a video game called Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. It’s an action game in which you’re a shinobi trying to rescue your young kidnapped lord from formidable foes. You may have heard that it’s a hard game. I’m probably less than a quarter of the way through, but I’ve already lost track of how many times I’ve died — without exaggeration, the number is probably in the 40 to 50 range. Both in spite of and because of that difficulty, I’m having a great time. It’s an awesome game. Admittedly, I’m a fan of developer From Software. I’ve written in the past about the positive impact that Dark Souls, one of its previous games, had on my life. Overcoming the challenges of that game led me to some important life lessons. Sekiro might be the most difficult game this company has made and it has a reputation for making hard games. This has led to an intense online debate about whether or not Sekiro should have an “easy mode.” In a lot of video games, you can choose if you want to play on easy, medium or hard. Sekiro doesn’t offer that choice. One compelling article on Kotaku argued for the need for accessibility options in Sekiro so gamers with disabilities can play too. I firmly believe Sekiro is a better game without an easy mode, and I don’t say that because I want to belong to an exclusive club of people who can play it. To me, the ideas of difficulty and accessibility should not be conflated. While some gamers with disabilities have already come forth in defense of the game, Sekiro and all video games should have readily available accessibility options so that anyone who wants to can play them. Having accessibility options — perhaps similar to those outlined on Twitter by the creator of Celeste, another difficult game — is not the same as offering an easy mode. Accessibility options should include specific tweaks to gameplay in a specialized menu you can access if you need them — such as tweaking the game’s speed — but should stay out of sight if you don’t need them. An easy mode typically means a choice presented to all players right at the start of the experience that changes many aspects of the balance of the game. A lot of the value of the experience of Sekiro comes from overcoming the challenges and improving at the game. Playing Sekiro can be an incredible experience for anyone with the patience and perseverance to see it through, and in a lot of ways, Sekiro is a better game for gamers that kinda suck.Opening the gatesA big misconception about Sekiro and Dark Souls is they are only for “elite” gamers. That’s not the case at all, and those who argue against an easy mode because they want to use these titles for a kind of artificial gatekeeping, that keeps gaming exclusively for “real gamers,” are missing the whole point.They’re meant to be teaching exercises. They’re meant to provide a feeling of hard-won accomplishment not found in other games. Sekiro is designed for those willing to put in the effort. Period. That’s what makes it beautiful. The difficulty in Sekiro makes you pay attention and take in every detail of the environment. The difficulty is what makes the back-and-forth samurai swordplay so enthralling. You have to know when to attack and when to defend and each decision you make in each split second could lead to victory or defeat.All games should be playable by all gamers, but Sekiro is not walled off for only the elite. It takes humility. You will certainly die, and if you get mad at the game and stop, you won’t get better. If you let your deaths teach you how to improve, you’ll eventually be able to conquer everything the game throws at you. It’s a cool feeling when that happens, and a unique one in gaming, and there should be room in the gaming world for all manner of unique experiences.sekiro-gamescom01Combat in Sekiro is demanding and awesome. Activision Stumbling to victoryAs painful as it is for me to admit this, I’m not a particularly skilled gamer. I enjoy video games, but I tend to struggle my way through them, especially ones that are supposed to be hard. Another recent action game called God of War offers four different difficulty modes. In order from easiest to hardest, they were called “give me a story,” “give me a balanced experience,” “give me a challenge” and “give me God of War.” The game was lauded for letting people choose their own experience without being made to feel guilty if they wanted something easier. That was part of the artistic vision of the designers and there’s nothing wrong with that. God of War is an awesome game. I ended up playing the balanced experience option after trying and failing at the next level up. Even the normal difficulty proved challenging enough to kill me several times, but I never felt stuck. That wasn’t the point of God of War. That difficulty was perfect for me and perfectly described. Sekiro doesn’t have that. It has a narrower focus. God of War is about many things. At the forefront is a story about a father trying to reconnect with his son over the course of a harrowing journey. Sekiro has a story too, but it’s primarily about overcoming the steep challenges presented through patience and perseverance. In a lot of games, you make your character more powerful as you play. You do that in Sekiro too, but you also get significantly better at the game and as a gamer. The game teaches you how to win as long as you’re willing to learn. You’re naturally going to improve at almost any game as you play it, but I’ve never experienced anything similar to the curve of a From Software game.After beating Dark Souls for the first time, I started a new game with a fresh character to try my hand at some of the early bosses again. These bosses had all killed me numerous times on my first playthrough — approaching 10 to 20 times each. On that second playthrough, I killed the first three bosses without getting hit. Again, I’d started fresh, so it wasn’t my character that was more powerful. It was me — I was much more powerful. That’s an amazing feeling. Like Dark Souls before it, Sekiro is incredible in that regard. It’s collaborative art at its most interactive, because it requires your dedication to see it through to the end. Your journey mirrors the protagonist’s more than in any other game I’ve played. As your character faces tough challenges and grows and learns, so do you. Compromising on that vision with an easy mode would lessen that quality. It would take away from its singular artistic focus.Why do we fall? sekiro-1Defeating your enemies in Sekiro after a hard-fought battle feels amazing.  Activision I’m still early in Sekiro. Just last night, a midlevel boss killed me five times, but I eventually beat him. Most enemies in the game are stronger than your character, but that’s OK, because every time you get knocked down, you can get back up and try again. To beat him, I couldn’t worry about the fact that I’m inevitably going to face much more challenging bosses. My job at that moment was to overcome that one task, and trust that this challenge would teach me to face the next one. Like the other From Software games I’ve played, Sekiro teaches a few life lessons about learning through failure and facing the task in front of you. Working through it is a remarkable experience that any gamer with patience and a willingness to learn can have. An easy mode would take away some of the qualities that make this game so wonderful. Not wanting to be frustrated with a video game is understandable, but not every video game needs to appeal to every taste. I sometimes like playing video games to relax as well. That’s not Sekiro, and it’s better for it. It’s unique and demanding and it’s meant for everyone who can appreciate those qualities in a game. Nintendo Labo VR, reviewed: a box of magic tricks 28 Photos The 28 best games on PlayStation 4center_img Video Games Now playing: Watch this: 3:03 Share your voice Originally published on April 14. last_img read more

Lailatul Qadr being observed

first_imgMuslims across the country are observing the holy Lailatul Qadr tonight (Thursday) with due religious fervour and solemnity, according to UNB. The holy Quran was revealed to prophet Hazrat Muhammad (PBUH) on this night to show mankind the path of worldly and eternal emancipation.  According to the holy Quran, the night is superior to one thousand nights. Devotees will pass the night offering special prayers, reciting from the holy Quran and holding milad mahfil and zikr. In their prayers, they will seek divine blessings for themselves, country and Muslim Ummah. Bangladesh Television, Bangladesh Betar and private TV channels and radio stations are airing special programmes while newspapers published special supplements highlighting the significance of the night.last_img read more

CRYing need to get them to school

first_imgChild Rights and You, India’s leading Child 30th rights NGO and its alliance, APR – Alliance for People’s Rights, organised a day long theatre festival in the capital.This was an open forum for children to speak out on issues that affect them the most in school. Shiksha Hamara Haq theme of the festival amplified the voices of more than 50 children between ages 6-14 from different parts of city. Corporal punishment and discrimination, barriers in education due to lack of infrastructure, positive impact of RTE Act are the issues which the festival addressed. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Padhna isi ka naam hai, Dhoondte reh jaoge, Thoda hai thode kee zarurat hai, were three plays where children showcased what they have observed as issues of basic infrastructure in their school, hygiene and access to playgrounds. The theatre festival was followed up by a panel discussion on the status of education in Delhi. Themes of the discussion were, ensuring enrolment of all children between 6-14 years in school, as per the current provisions of RTE Act, 2009, ensuring that no child is subjected to any kind of corporal punishment of any nature- physical or mental, To ensure ‘compulsory education’ for all children through availability of a neighbourhood school with proper infrastructure.last_img read more

Bookworms are usually friendlier

first_imgIn some good news for bookworms, scientists have found that people who regularly read fiction novels are more likely to be friendly, well-behaved and sympathetic towards others.Those who prefer watching television over reading are less sociable, according to the study. Those who like reading of drama and romance novels were best able to understand other people, while those who preferred experimental books showed more positive social behaviour and ability to see things from different perspectives. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”The findings support previous evidence that exposure to fiction relates to a range of empathetic abilities,” said Rose Turner, from Kingston University in the UK.Researchers at Kingston University questioned 123 people on their preferences for books, TV and plays.The volunteers were then tested on their interpersonal skills and prosocial behaviour – such as whether they considered other’s feelings, whether they could see things from different points of view and whether they acted to help others. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveResearchers found people who preferred reading novels were more likely to show positive social behaviour and be able to empathise with others.However, those who preferred watching TV did not have the same ability to empathise and were more likely to show antisocial behaviour.Comedy fans scored the highest for being able to relate to others, The Sun reported.Researchers suggest that this could be because reading books allow people to see things from other’s points of view, which makes them better able to understand others.”All forms of fiction are not equal. Associations between empathetic skills, media and genre diverge,” said Turner.”Engaging with fictional prose and comedy in particular could be key to enhancing people’s empathetic abilities,” she said.last_img read more

Rice breaks ground for a new multipurpose Recreation and Wellness Center

first_imgShareCONTACT: B.J. AlmondPHONE: 713-348-6770E-MAIL: balmond@rice.eduRice breaks ground for a new multipurpose Recreation and Wellness CenterRice University broke ground today for a $41 million Recreation and Wellness Center that will offer students, faculty and staff state-of-the-art workout and health facilities for everything from competitive swimming and billiards to nutritional counseling and meditative classroom space. Project manager Joe Buchanan said the building will feature several distinctive design elements: Long Description Donors and dignitaries waved flags to signal the start of the recreation center construction. Long Description The two-story, 103,000-square-foot building will house two indoor basketball courts, four racquetball courts, two squash courts, a 50-meter outdoor competition pool, a 2,500-square-foot recreation pool, cardio-fitness equipment, weights, a dance studio, billiards, table tennis, two outdoor lighted basketball courts, locker rooms and a ”wellness” courtyard. Scheduled to open in August 2009, it will also serve as the new home of the Rice Wellness Center.“Rice students have always studied hard, and now they will have a wonderful new facility where they can play just as hard,” President David Leebron said. “We know that a healthy mind and a healthy body go hand in hand, and this facility can accommodate almost everyone’s needs and interests. It will become yet another place, along with our new Brochstein Pavilion, where we can come together for informal activities and interaction.”Rice will hold a grand opening later this week for the pavilion, a glassed-in café located on the west side of Fondren Library in the university’s Central Quadrangle. Both facilities are part of a major construction initiative at Rice as the university prepares to increase its student body and raise its profile as a premier international research university under Leebron’s 10-point Vision for the Second Century. The Recreation and Wellness Center will be funded solely through philanthropy. “We are particularly grateful to David and Barbara Gibbs for making the lead gift for this historic project,” Leebron said. “We also want to thank Ralph O’Connor and Carl Isgren for their generous gifts.”David and Barbara Gibbs are both alumni of Rice. David received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemical engineering — both in 1971. Barbara received a B.A. in Spanish in 1973.  She went on to earn an M.D. from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in 1977.  David is now president of David K. Gibbs Associates, a real estate agency that he established in 1978.                     JEFF FITLOW Donor Barbara Gibbs presents President Leebron with the first of many palm trees that will flank the new recreation center. Ralph O’Connor served as a term governor at Rice from 1967 to 1976 and then as a trustee from 1976 to 1988.  He returned as a trustee from 1994 until 1996, when he became a trustee emeritus. He received a B.A. in biology from Johns Hopkins University in 1951 and completed Harvard Business School’s Advanced Management Program in 1967.  He is founder and CEO of the investment firm Ralph S. O’Connor & Associates, which he established in 1987.Carl Isgren is a Rice alum and a trustee. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in accounting and economics from Rice in 1961. He was elected to the board in 2004. Isgren retired in 1997 as president and CEO of Owen Healthcare Inc. after negotiating the merger of Owen and Cardinal Healthcare. Under his leadership, Owen became the leading provider of hospital pharmacy management services in the U.S.The new rec center will be located at the northwest corner of Alumni Drive and Laboratory Road, kitty-corner from the Student Center and adjacent to the north campus recreational fields. As it did with other major construction projects on campus, Rice relocated several mature elm and oak trees to make room for the building without reducing the campus’s famous tree population.The Athletics Department will manage the center. “Nearly every Rice student participates in sports of some kind, and there’s no doubt in my mind that they will be thrilled with all of the options available in the new Recreation and Wellness Center,” Del Conte said. “This facility will add another great dimension to the total Rice experience for students, as well as for faculty and staff.”  JEFF FITLOW Donor David Gibbs speaks to a crowd at the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Rice Recreation and Wellness Center.He was joined on stage by, from left, Student Association President Matt Youn, Director of Athletics Chris Del Conte, Chairman of the Board of Trustees Jim Crownover, David Gibbs, donor Barbara Gibbs, Rice President David Leebron, donor Ralph O’Connor and Graduate Student Association President Michael Contreras.  TOMMY LAVERGNE AddThis Long Description About adminlast_img read more