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Netgear uncovers a thirdgen Meural smart art frame at CES 2019

first_img CES 2019 CNET Smart Home CES 2019: Every story so far: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. CES 2019 schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. 1:10 Over-the-air wireless charging will come to the smartphone Samsung’s CES 2019 robots just want to give you a helping hand The weirdest, wackiest products from the show See all our CES coverage Post a comment 0 Create a digital picture frame using an old iPad Share your voice Tags Netgear We last wrote about the Meural Smart Canvas at CES 2017 when it was still a startup product. Netgear scooped it up in August 2018, and is now announcing a third-generation version of the smart art frame here at CES. The Meural is essentially a large, Wi-Fi-connected digital display that you hang on your wall. A $50 annual subscription buys you access to a database of over 30,000 images from various artists and institutions around the world, which you can then display on the 1080p screen. The previous version cost $600 for a 27-inch model.  center_img See also Netgear has also made a few technical updates to produce the Meural 3.0. Among other things, Netgear says it has added an improved Wi-Fi chipset that’s more stable and with country-specific tweaks. It also moved the light sensor, which the company says helps the screen adjust for brightness levels more consistently. You can also look forward to more streamlined setup from the accompanying app. Netgear hasn’t specified pricing or availability timing of the Meural 3.0, but we hope to see it before the end of 2019. Netgear is introducing a few more options for the Meural with this third-generation version. You can opt for a 21.5-inch model or the original 27-inch design. You can also choose from a few different bezels, including black, white, or light or dark woods. Art partners for the subscription service now include the Saturday Evening Post and Normal Rockwell Archives, as well as the National Geographic archive. All the cool new gadgets at CES 2019 Now playing: Watch this: 85 Photos Smart Home Netgearlast_img read more

Lailatul Qadr being observed

first_imgMuslims across the country are observing the holy Lailatul Qadr tonight (Thursday) with due religious fervour and solemnity, according to UNB. The holy Quran was revealed to prophet Hazrat Muhammad (PBUH) on this night to show mankind the path of worldly and eternal emancipation.  According to the holy Quran, the night is superior to one thousand nights. Devotees will pass the night offering special prayers, reciting from the holy Quran and holding milad mahfil and zikr. In their prayers, they will seek divine blessings for themselves, country and Muslim Ummah. Bangladesh Television, Bangladesh Betar and private TV channels and radio stations are airing special programmes while newspapers published special supplements highlighting the significance of the night.last_img read more

2 killed in lightning strikes

first_imgFile photo of LightningTwo people were killed by lightning strikes in separate places in Nachole upazila of Chapainawabganj on Wednesday, reports UNB.The deceased are Ekramul Haque, 35, son of Wajob Ali of Surjopur Kataripara are in Nachol upazila and Arman, 30, son of Kabir Ali of Fatepur Bera village.Officer-in-charge of Nachol police station Zobair Ahmed said Ekramul sustained injury after being struck by lightning while he was working in his cropland at 12:30pm.Local people rescued him and sent him to Nachol Upazila Health Complex where physicians declared him dead.In another incident, Arman, 30, son of Kabir Ali of Fatepur Bera village, was killed as a thunderbolt hit him on his cropland at noon, said UP member Mojibur Rahman.last_img read more

New exploration shows parts of North Atlantic seabed were once above sea

first_img Extending for 3,861 square miles (10,000 square km) just north east of the Orkney-Shetland Islands, and about 1.2 miles (almost 2 kilometers) beneath the surface, the undersea terrain appears to have once existed above sea level, forming an island. By examining data from echo-sounding technology employed by contractors working for oil companies, maps of the ocean floor were able to be made. The maps constructed are 3-D in nature, and thus are able to show not just the ocean floor, but what lies beneath; hence its use in looking for oil. In looking at the maps, the researchers were able to see that beneath the layers of silt and other assorted debris, was a lost land of sorts, one that had been pushed up by the Icelandic Plume, or expansion of the mantle due to the hot magma below.The images constructed were sharp enough to allow the researchers to identify ancient rivers and mountain peaks and even some fossils, all from some 56 million years ago. The images also suggest that the ocean floor rose in three distinct stages of about 200-400 m each, creating the island which they believe lasted for about a million years, before once again disappearing beneath the cold waters of the North Atlantic Sea. White describes the seascape as appearing for all the world like that of a modern landscape.The echo-technology used by the contractors involved releasing highly pressurized air beneath the surface of the sea, which produced sound waves capable of passing through the ocean floor sediment. When the sound waves eventually bounced back, they were captured by microphones dragged behind a boat and fed into a computer to produce the 3-D images.The initial research team followed up on the 3-D imagery by taking core samples, some of which contained pollen and coal, suggesting land-dwelling life once existed there. The Cambridge team also found fossils indicating there was also a marine environment at one time.The research team thinks that the now sunken landscape is part of a much bigger region that at one time merged with modern Scotland and may have reached all the way to Norway. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: New exploration shows parts of North Atlantic seabed were once above sea level (2011, July 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-exploration-north-atlantic-seabed-sea.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. UNH-NOAA ocean mapping expedition yields new insights into arctic depths More information: Transient convective uplift of an ancient buried landscape, Nature Geoscience (2011) doi:10.1038/ngeo1191AbstractSedimentary basins in the North Atlantic Ocean preserve a record of intermittent uplift during Cenozoic times. These variations in elevation are thought to result from temperature changes within the underlying Icelandic mantle plume. When parts of the European continental shelf were episodically lifted above sea level, new landscapes were carved by erosion, but these landscapes then subsided and were buried beneath marine sediments. Here, we use three-dimensional seismic data to reconstruct one of these ancient landscapes that formed off the northwest coast of Europe during the Palaeocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum. We identify a drainage network within the landscape and, by modelling the profiles of individual rivers within this network, we reconstruct the history of surface uplift. We show that the landscape was lifted above sea level in a series of three discrete steps of 200–400 m each. After about 1 million years of subaerial exposure, this landscape was reburied. We use the magnitude and duration of uplift to constrain the temperature and velocity of a mantle-plume anomaly that drove landscape formation. We conclude that pulses of hot, chemically depleted, mantle material spread out radially beneath the lithospheric plate at velocities of ~35 cm yr−1. Image (c) R A Hartley et al./Nature Geoscience (2011) doi:10.1038/ngeo1191 (PhysOrg.com) — Using data obtained from oil searching contractors, researchers have discovered that parts of what is now the ocean floor off the northern coast of Scotland, were at one time raised up enough by thermal expansion beneath to have jutted at least 1 kilometer above the sea. Nicky White, senior researcher from the University of Cambridge and his team explain what they’ve found in their paper published in Nature Geoscience.last_img read more

Pascal Lamy Broadcaster lobby group Broadcast Netw

first_imgPascal LamyBroadcaster lobby group Broadcast Network Europe (BNE), under the banner of the Wider Spectrum Group, has called on the European Commission to provide greater long-term legal certainty that sufficient spectrum will be made available to preserve terrestrial broadcasting alongside mobile broadband.In an open letter to EC president Jean-Claude Juncker, the group called on the EC “to consider the impact of frequency allocation on European jobs and growth” and “the possible consequences for the media, creative and cultural sector, now recognised as one of Europe’s top three sectors by growth and employment”.In the letter, the group said it hoped for a consensual outcome to spectrum allocation and said there is a strong case for co-existence between terrestrial broadcasting and mobile broadband services.It expressed surprised that the EC’s reported draft communication on the Digital Single Market appears to incorporate “so few traces” of the Lamy report on the future of the UHF – 700MHz – band, which made a strong case for the continued relevance of DTT. The group said that the draft communication “appears not to make the connection between spectrum allocation and local creative and cultural jobs, media pluralism and diversity”.In an annex to its letter, the Wider Spectrum Group said that moving away from DTT would result in a loss of €38.5 billion to the European economy even before any impact on the EU’s creative industries was taken into consideration.last_img read more

YouTube TV Viewers now watch more than 100 million

first_imgYouTube TVViewers now watch more than 100 million hours of YouTube in the living room every day, up 70% compared to last year, according to Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai. Speaking on the Google parent company’s third quarter earnings call, Pichai said that YouTube users spend an average of 60 minutes a day on mobile – but noted that growth “isn’t just happening on desktop”.YouTube’s living room expansion comes as the video service continues to invest in new subscription models – particularly in the US where its live television service YouTube TV is now available across two thirds of the country.“YouTube Red, our first foray into the subscription market, is on track to release over 40 original shows this year,” added Pichai.YouTube claims more than 1.5 billion users globally and Pichai said that ads on the video service “continue to deliver the highest viewability rates in the industry”.“YouTube now has a 95% ad viewability rate, which is significantly higher than the average 66% viewability rate of other video ads,” he said, noting an “industry shift to six-second bumper ads”.On the call, Pichai described YouTube as one of Alphabet’s “three big bets” – alongside Google Cloud and its hardware business, which recently launched a host of products including the Google Home Mini voice assistant and Google’s flagship Pixel 2 smartphone.“YouTube continues to see phenomenal growth as the premier global destination where people go to watch video,” said Pichai.“Three of the key areas we are focused on are strengthening the existing community, continuing to drive growth, and expanding our subscriptions business. On the community side, we are helping create meaningfully interactions that bring creators and fans closer together.”While Alphabet does not break out earnings for YouTube, overall the company recorded a 24% increase in revenues year-on-year, which chief financial officer Ruth Porat attributed to “investments over many years in fantastic people, products and partnerships.”For the three months ended September 30, revenue came to US$27.8 billion. Operating income was up 28% year-on-year to US$7.8 billion. Net income was US$6.7 billion.last_img read more